5 highlights of the Vulpine autumn/winter range + video

British clothing brand includes cycle-specific jeans for the first time along with quilted jacket and gilet

by Mat Brett   September 1, 2014  

Cycle clothing brand Vulpine has just released its autumn/winter range and here are five of the most interesting looking pieces.

 

1 Jinzu Raw Selvedge Cycling Jeans £179

The Jinzu Raw Selvedge Jeans are made from raw 12oz Japanese denim, from beside the Jinzu River. They’re cut specifically for cycling and come a diamond gusset for comfort in the saddle.

If you want cushioning, Vupline suggest you team them up with their padded Merino Boxers (£45)

Selvedge refers to a self-finished edge of the denim – which is the white-edge, in this case, when you turn up the hem.

 

2 Ultralight Thermal Quilted Jacket £169

The new jacket is designed to be warm and windproof for riding in cold weather. It’s quilted with Primaloft Gold insulation, the highest level of Primaloft which is breathable and (as the jacket name implies) lightweight. The outer fabric is said to be water resistant, as is the Primaloft Gold, and it dries fast.

Nick at Vulpine says that the thermal Jacket is cut loose for heavy layers and that many cyclists will prefer to size down for a slimmer fit with a single base layer.

 

3 Ultralight Thermal Quilted Gilet £119


As you might expect, the Ultralight Quilted Thermal Gilet is similar to the jacket (above) but with an absence of sleeves. The shoulders, like those of the jacket, are designed to be tough for coping with backpack and messenger bag straps.

 

4 Polka Cotton Cap £15

This is a classic cotton cycling cap although Vulpine reckon it’s the attention to detail that sets it apart from the crowd – and the polka dots. It comes in green, orange and red options.

 

5 Dogtooth Merino Silk Socks £25


Vulpine reckon that the combination of merino wool and silk means these draw moisture off the skin effectively. They’re intended to be comfortable even when wet.

 

Plus

Vulpine’s core lines return, with the Epic Cotton range in new colours for the urban styled Harrington Rain Jacket (£195), the more feature-laden distance riding Original Rain Jacket (£199), Cotton Rain Trousers (£139), and Cotton Rain Shorts (£115).

Vulpine in Bergen, Norway - Autumn Winter 2014 from Vulpine on Vimeo.

Pure merino wool long sleeves are back in the form of Alpine Jerseys (£99), Polo Shirts (£89) and Tees (£69).

The Thermal Storm Cap returns (£35), a fleece lined version of their popular wet weather Storm Cap (£25).

Check out the full range at www.vulpine.cc

 

12 user comments

Oldest firstNewest firstBest rated

That quilted jacket in red looks lovely. But i imagine i would sweat like hell wearing that for more than 10 km

posted by Scoob_84 [221 posts]
1st September 2014 - 11:13

1 Like

The primaloft stuff is for putting on after (or before) high output activity. I don't understand why Vulpine show anyone actually exercising in them, they are way too hot and not breathable enough (although maybe you could get away with the gilet if it was truly freezing - I confess to wearing one on a 4 hour enduro in winter a couple of years ago where the temperature was -4C to -1C). And the DWR treatment won't be enough to really make them rainwear. Pricing is not bad - Patagonia Nano Puff jacket/gilet (with same Prima Loft Gold insulation) go for £160/£110, for example, although the RAB Xenon is only £120 and would appear to do much the same thing. Which isn't to say the Vulpine stuff isn't any good or isnt more appropriate for cycling. I just think insulation - whether down or synthetic fill - isn't really for riding in and is done as well/better by others (outdoor manufacturers).

posted by surly_by_name [153 posts]
1st September 2014 - 12:15

2 Likes

"I just think insulation - whether down or synthetic fill - isn't really for riding in [...]"

Just depends on your weather conditions; here in the south west of England, my Mavic Primaloft jacket has baked me both times I've worn it the in two years of ownership - I ought to flog it to someone in a properly cold place. In contrast, the Polartec Alpha-lined jacket I bought last year has been ideal for riding in without causing me the 'Marine in a spelling test' level of perspiration.

As to the Vulpine kit; nice looking gear that doesn't scream 'cyclist' when not riding, so well done Nick - keep it up!

posted by Dr_Lex [151 posts]
1st September 2014 - 12:25

2 Likes

Liking the gilet, but not in that orange, and probably not for actually riding in either.

'Marine in a spelling test' - made me chuckle!

Last night I would have considered trading a very loud baby for a really nice bike.

posted by notfastenough [3424 posts]
1st September 2014 - 12:34

0 Likes

the Ultralight Quilted jacket looks like something you would go to the shops in, and not very cycle specific, not a good thing, surely? It looks quite bulky for cycling too.

posted by Karbon Kev [682 posts]
1st September 2014 - 12:43

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surly_by_name wrote:
The primaloft stuff is for putting on after (or before) high output activity. I don't understand why Vulpine show anyone actually exercising in them, they are way too hot and not breathable enough -- I just think insulation - whether down or synthetic fill - isn't really for riding in and is done as well/better by others (outdoor manufacturers).

Another side of it.. I did a ride the other week where a Montane Primaloft gilet was the difference between completing the last 100 miles or so, or bailing to a B+B to get dried off and warmed up. It wasn't that cold, just windy and wet with longer descents. Waterproofs and damp cycling tops don't insulate. When it's like that primaloft is brilliant stuff and on long rides you're often not at a pace where overheating is an issue. Great to go under or over a windbreaker for long descents too as windproofs don't always keep the chill off. Agreed that outdoor gear makers usually do this stuff well and that there's little bike gear really designed for extended bad weather riding - not to say that this gilet or top isn't a good one and it's good to see more options.
How often do you see shivering riders during wet sportives? 250-300g of packable insulation that you can ride in, that still insulates when wet?

posted by james-o [208 posts]
1st September 2014 - 13:29

3 Likes

One hundred and seventy nine British pounds for a pair of jeans ? Laughing

Are they extracting the urine or something ? One can purchase any number of pairs at one's local charity shop for about £5 each.

Jinzu River my gluteus maximus.

michophull's picture

posted by michophull [103 posts]
1st September 2014 - 15:45

1 Like

I have a primaloft gilet, less than 300g, which I carry on night and cold rides. It's not been cold enough to wear it while riding, normally I will have a merino base and a cycling specific softshell which is enough, BUT if a puncture calls or as soon as I reach a control I whip off the usually damp softshell and pop this on. Stops that rapid temp drop and shivering when you stop cranking out the body heat - recommended! Quite good just to know you have it too if the rain sets in at night.

Also good for just wearing around and walking, it gets a lot of off-bike use as well in winter - worth every penny. I have often thought of upgrading to a full pull over but living in the SE the gilet is enough for me.

alotronic's picture

posted by alotronic [289 posts]
1st September 2014 - 15:57

1 Like

Totally agree with posts on the uses of primaloft in cycling, its too hot for a Portland winter so perhaps it is for shopping trips to the mall..

What I find harder to swallow are the high prices. But Vulpine do seem to be building a reputation for very deep sales and stock dumping on discount sports sites..

FG

Fixie Girl's picture

posted by Fixie Girl [124 posts]
1st September 2014 - 18:07

2 Likes

Look forward to some reviews. Hint, hint.

posted by Cafe Rider [5 posts]
1st September 2014 - 22:10

0 Likes

The backs look very short.

posted by Binky [115 posts]
2nd September 2014 - 0:16

1 Like

Quote:
One can purchase any number of pairs at one's local charity shop for about £5 each.

If you're really lucky, you can sometimes find free trousers in laybys or round the back of bins. Yawn

posted by BigDummy [298 posts]
2nd September 2014 - 9:32

3 Likes