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We're still looking for a folding electric fat trike

Eurobike demo day gives us a chance to sling a leg over some of the new bikes we’ve been telling you about over the last few months,  and some that we’ve never set eyes on before. It’s also a chance to get a glimpse of some of the more esoteric and downright odd stuff that Eurobike is chock full of. Here are some of the things that we saw.

This Bygen beam bike is a mad thing indeed. It’s based around a beam mechanism that can slide fore and aft so the bike will fold up and fit in the boot of your car. Plus you can alter the top tube length for a good fit. We suppose.

The most extraordinary feature of the Bygen is the pedal mechanism, which places the pedals where you’d normally expect to find them but instead of a chain they’re attached by a linkage directly to the rear hub, which has internal gears. It all looks a bit Heath-Robinson, but people were riding them around and they didn’t seem to be breaking. It weighs about 10kg and will set you back a salty $5,000.

On to a much classier looking machine: the Faraday Porteur. Faraday are a California-based bike builder and this is their first bike. It’s electric, with a motor in the front wheel and the battery concealed in the down tube. The brains are contained in an aluminium unit at the rear that also serves as rear light. There’s also an integrated front light and the option for front and rear racks. A bar-mounted lever with an e-ink strip serves to adjust the assistance level and tell you how much battery remains.

Faraday are taking orders in the US for the Porteur, which is priced at $3,500. They don’t have a UK distributor at the moment.

Along similar lines, the Coboc electric bike is an exercise in understatement and integration. Again the battery is in the down tube but the minimal controls are recessed into the top tube.

There’s one button to turn the bike on and switch modes (it has a 250W mode and a 500W high-power mode) and you charge it with a magnetic lead that clips in underneath the top tube where the buttons are. The motor’s in the rear wheel and you get just the one gear, although with 500W on hand you’ll probably be just fine.

Raleigh may have re-issued the Chopper but if you’re looking for something to take your grown-up legs about in similar style, these cruisers from Pegas might be just the thing…

Remember Maria Leijerstram? She biked to the South Pole, using an ICE trikes custom-built fat trike recumbent. ICE had her trike at the demo day so we had a quick buzz about on it, and it was a lot of fun: it’s about as close as you can be to invincible on any kind of pedal vehicle. It’s geared for slow progress (bottom gear is 8 inches) and the massive tyres grip like nothing else so you can winch yourself up pretty much anything. We can’t see it catching on as a trend, although if you bunged an electric motor in there it’d pretty much be ticking all the niche boxes.

Magma were showing this carbon re-imagining of the magnesium Kirk Precision that was on Tomorrow's World back in the '80s. Exactly why you’d want to re-imagine the Kirk Precision wasn’t clear, but that’s never stopped bike manufacturers in the past and it sure wasn’t stopping Magma.

Biomega had a clean and classy urban bike on the Gates stand. As well as the carbon belt drive it had some other interesting features, such as the mudguard formed as part of the down tube. And a very pretty stem.

Lastly, it’s not a bike but we want a go in Canyon’s enduro team van.

Click here to read all of our stories from Eurobike 2014 - the world's biggest bike show.

Dave is a founding father of road.cc and responsible for kicking the server when it breaks. In a previous life he was a graphic designer but he's also a three-time Mountain Bike Bog Snorkelling world champion, and remains unbeaten through the bog. Dave rides all sorts of bikes but tends to prefer metal ones. He's getting old is why.

11 comments

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mrmo [2077 posts] 1 year ago
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any chance of keeping an eye out for new lights, and I mean german road legal lights, not torches.

Bit of a wishlist, but I assume you will do a light test this year? but any chance of getting some of the dynamo/german battery lights in to compare to the high lumen "torches"? Be nice to get a real idea of what a 60-70Lux light compares to.

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StoopidUserName [171 posts] 1 year ago
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Electric bikes...all the advantages of the clueless nodder combined with the power of a small moped...yay!!!

Sorry, dont like them...unless they are for disabled people or those in very hilly areas...not gonna solve the obesity problem by putting people on basically small mopeds but with no requirement to have any training.

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StoopidUserName [171 posts] 1 year ago
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ps. like all the odd stuff though, makes things more interesting!

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Dr_Lex [301 posts] 1 year ago
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mrmo wrote:

any chance of keeping an eye out for new lights, and I mean german road legal lights, not torches.

Bit of a wishlist, but I assume you will do a light test this year? but any chance of getting some of the dynamo/german battery lights in to compare to the high lumen "torches"? Be nice to get a real idea of what a 60-70Lux light compares to.

IIRC, previous years' tests were limited to what was submitted by manufacturers/distributors. If the inclusion of a generic "MagicShine" clone last time was as a result of the road.cc coffers being opened, perhaps the number of likes on your post might persuade the tester to include a purchased EuroLamp amongst the proffered supertorches.

(As to electric bikes - I always think "one less car!")

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Paul_C [463 posts] 1 year ago
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"Faraday Porteur"

battery can only be removed using special tools when replacement is required...

so as you can't take the battery out in order to charge it indoors, they can forget about it...

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jollygoodvelo [1422 posts] 1 year ago
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I want a folding carbon fat-e-bike with belt drive, hydraulic disc brakes and wireless gears, integrated lights and mudguards. For bonus points, dubiously "aero" design along with some possibly-spurious but scientifically researched claims about it saving a trivial number of watts will have me foaming at the credit card.  4

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StoopidUserName [171 posts] 1 year ago
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Dr_Lex wrote:

(As to electric bikes - I always think "one less car!")

You're probably right and I'm probably too moany!

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SamSkjord [39 posts] 1 year ago
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Just don't let them on strava, I'm struggling as it is  7

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Dezzie [4 posts] 1 year ago
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As usual folk think that anything not a mountain bike or a racer is crap and inferior to everything else, wake up, not everybody wants to ride the above, some have other tastes, just because some bikes have an electric motor don't assume its only good for folk with disabilities, it pisses me off the small mindedness of some of the comments on this site, I have a beach cruiser, a 20 inch tricked up folding xootr swift which is very fast, a Raleigh shopper I just done up for sale and awaiting some old Moultons to do up, I love mini velo's but uk dealers are too scared to be different and break the trend to get any in the shops as they think EVERYBODY wants mtb's and race bikes, we don't, I have never and will never own a racer, mountain bikes I find uncomfortable also, I have arthritis in my back and knees and I am 42, trained for years in fitness and taught kickboxing the lot, please search the web, try to understand others needs in bikes, don't dismiss 20 inch wheeled bikes as being kids bikes, I still believe a vintage moulton bike is still banned from the velodrome since the 1960s as it embarrassed bikes with bigger wheels with the speeds it can do and recently a modern version has done just the same, what about the unfit overweight people who would like to get fitter, why cant they have a voice, is their money not good enough? cant old folks and less able bodied people who think they have to give up cycling be left to do so if there is an aid like electric bikes that would allow them to keep out in the great outdoors! snobbery and small minded comments is what further alienates peple against cycling in the first place and we have enough to deal with from other road users, everybody has a place on the roads, deal with it, maybe you may have an accident someday and need one of these bikes to get round on, I would love to see more mini velo's in the UK, gives people and kids other options from the norm. Happy cycling.

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stealth [254 posts] 1 year ago
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Moultons (in particular, old ones) are fabulous!
I also like the Beam bike, Clever idea.

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Chuck [546 posts] 1 year ago
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StoopidUserName wrote:

Electric bikes...all the advantages of the clueless nodder combined with the power of a small moped...yay!!!

Sorry, dont like them...unless they are for disabled people or those in very hilly areas...not gonna solve the obesity problem by putting people on basically small mopeds but with no requirement to have any training.

While I won't be rushing out to buy an electric bike any time soon I'm not sure they're such a bad thing.

Maybe they won't solve the obesity problem, but they might get some people who wouldn't otherwise consider it out of their cars and onto bikes and that has to be a good thing in my book.
And that's still true even if they haven't got an objectively good reason for not riding a 'proper' bike- maybe they're just lazy gits. But more people on two wheels would still be a shift away from the car-centric society we have now.

On top of that there will probably come a day when I can't ride like I do now but I hope I'll still want to get out, and ebikes might let me.

You might have a point though about letting people loose on cycle lanes etc. with basically mini mopeds- potential for some problems there maybe. That said in the NL you do see a lot of scooters in bike lanes.