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Italian bike maker takes you inside its factory in Cambiago to reveal work that goes into its high-end road frame

Ever wondered how a top-end carbon fibre frame is put together? This video takes you inside Colnago’s factory in Cambiago, Italy, to show you the work that goes into producing its C60 frame, launched earlier this year.

You can read our review of the Colnago C60 from May this year here, plus here’s a look at the one being ridden by Europcar’s Yukiya Arashiro in the Tour de France.

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

11 comments

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Nick T [913 posts] 1 year ago
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Lovely.

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ajmarshal1 [411 posts] 1 year ago
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I'm fortunate enough to have been allowed one of these for my birthday next year. This isn't helping with impatience. The problem now is deciding on paint scheme.

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Nick T [913 posts] 1 year ago
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That would suggest you let your wife know the cost for one. A bold, bold move...

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Vinerman [60 posts] 1 year ago
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its all well and good, nicley finished product and well presented, but still lugged frame, the weak point is where the lug meets the tube, its the same technology since day one, tube meets lug, throughout they changed the diameter of the lug and the tube but the concept remains the same. imo it does not compare to tube-to-tube bonding.

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Nick T [913 posts] 1 year ago
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Tube to tube, where you mitre the tubes, wrap in carbon then bake together in epoxy to make the joint? What so different to this, where the tube is mitred, sleeved in carbon then baked together in an epoxy to make the joint?

I can see an argument for monocoque moulding being "better", but when frames have been made this way for 20 years without issue the whole thing becomes moot - and Colnago's peerless EU standard frame test results show that there's nothing inferior about their method anyway.

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truffy [653 posts] 1 year ago
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And if they were to post a video of their monocoque frame production it wouldn't have any Italians in it!  21

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John Stevenson [250 posts] 1 year ago
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truffy - as would be the case with certain other very prestigious Italian brands.

Colnago's never made a secret of it; in fact, he's been too open about it if anything.

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truffy [653 posts] 1 year ago
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True enough. Speaking of which, I think the Oltre is a better-looking bike than the C60. It's just a pity that I don't have the dedication, money, or ability to justify one.

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Nick T [913 posts] 1 year ago
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As would be the case with almost every other Italian brand, and indeed worldwide. Monocoque frames produced in the Far East aren't a bad thing, but colnago maintaining the employment of the frame builders who've worked for the firm for years is something that should be applauded.

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ajmarshal1 [411 posts] 1 year ago
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Nick T wrote:

That would suggest you let your wife know the cost for one. A bold, bold move...

I didn't tell her it was just for the frame....

There'll be some hasty, other bike sacrificial, panic cannibalisation going on in the shed once it arrives.

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Nick T [913 posts] 1 year ago
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