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Bumper crowds on opening day of race - but riders express concerns for their safety

Stars of the Tour de France including defending champion Chris Froome have urged fans to give riders more space as bumper crowds greeted the start of this year’s race in Yorkshire yesterday.

Froome described the atmosphere on yesterday’s opening stage as “incredible,” with an estimated 2 million spectators watching the race. He added that the crowds were “second to none,” reports the BBC.

But with the press of the crowds in some places making conditions hazardous for the riders, Froome and others have appealed for people to give participants adequate room.

His Sky team mate, Geraint Thomas, said: "It was great to race on home roads, but it is quite dangerous at times."

He added: "It was so noisy. My ears are ringing now; it was like being in a disco for four hours.

"Everyone's going on about how good it was."

The other British rider left in the race, Orica-GreenEdge’s Simon Yates, said: "The only real complaint is people taking selfies in the middle of the bunch and having their back to the peloton.

"Everyone is out there having fun and a lot of people don't realise we're coming past at 60kph and we use every inch of the roads," he added.

Shortly ahead of the intermediate sprint on today’s Stage 2 from York to Sheffield, one of race leader Marcel Kittel’s Giant Shimano team mates collided with a spectator who was too far into the road. Luckily the rider stayed upright, but the episode does illustrate riders’ concerns.

Tour de France organisers ASO often reinforce to fans the importance of not hampering the riders particularly in mountain stages.

One Twitter user, @Velorunnerfitness, said however that the fans in Yorkshire paid the riders more respect than some of those seen on the Continent: “Some spectators a bit naive misjudging race speeds but compared to some idiots on Alpe d'Huez or Zoncolan they've been very respectful #TDF.”

The frustration being felt by some of the riders was clearly shown on the Holme Moss climb today, with the TV cameras catching Garmin-Sharp’s Ramūnas Navardauskas knocking cameras and phones out of the hands of fans who had got too close.

Ahead of this year’s race a number of riders including Giant-Shimano’s Marcel Kittel, winner of yesterday’s opening stage in Harrogate, appeared in videos for organisers ASO in which fans were urged to ““Please respect the riders, protect yourself and especially your children.”

After yesterday's stage Kittel, quoted in The Times [£], “Some spectators were in the middle of the road taking pictures.”

“There were some moments when I thought, now we will crash, because the spectators were taking pictures and didn’t see that they were in the centre of the road,” he added.

Trek Factory Racing's Fabian Cancellara added: “It’s great to see such huge crowds, but the police should do something about it tomorrow because our health is in danger.

“Huge crowds are amazing for us bike riders but let’s try to keep it safe for everyone and make more space.”

The rider made a similar appeal on Twitter, his

Cancellara’s appeal, made on Twitter, resulted in some discussion on the social network, where some users agreed that fans needed to respect the race and the riders.

Twitter user @roseofwinter said: “Problem today was that people crowding the road caused splits in the peloton. Not on to potentially rob riders of their chance on GC because someone wants a closer look.”

But others defended the spectators, such as @BlazCTID, who pointed out “In France, the peleton is usually well strung out on the big climbs. The peleton was full today, need space.”

@Gkam84 said: “The problem was not the crowd, but the roads that were picked. No room for that many people,” adding that number of spectators should have been restricted on the narrower climbs.

Another user, @TwoSpareTubes, said that TV pictures made the crowding look worse than it was in person, saying “Didn't feel too bad on Grinton today.”

Assistant Chief Constable Mark Milsom who is heading the police operation at the Grand Départ, has urged spectators to stay off the road..

“Saturday was an amazing day with unbelievable crowds and we are expecting the same again today,” he said.

“Safety remains a top priority for the police and everybody involved in organising the event, so please stay off the routes when the caravan and peloton are passing through.”

Yesterday, a teenager watching the race was taken to hospital by helicopteto be treated for serious leg injuries after being struck by a team vehicle.

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

12 comments

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EnglishmanAbroad [45 posts] 1 year ago
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Some numpty just got his phone smashed, serves em right for standing so close.

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Miles253 [198 posts] 1 year ago
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Saw a good post somewhere about the majority of the spectators likely to go back to cycling hate in a few days. Ha

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DoctorDee [9 posts] 1 year ago
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"the majority of the spectators likely to go back to cycling hate in a few days"

After being called numptys and twats here, can you blame them?

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Simon E [2652 posts] 1 year ago
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DoctorDee wrote:

"the majority of the spectators likely to go back to cycling hate in a few days"

After being called numptys and twats here, can you blame them?

If they didn't have an irrational contempt towards other people simply because they happen to be on bicycles in the first place then they wouldn't be called numpties. Though there are stronger words that are equally applicable.

Share the roads, considerate driving costs nothing.

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Flying Heron [54 posts] 1 year ago
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Hang on a minute, we just have had o e of the best 2 days of cycling thIs country has ever had, education is what's needed not strong words. It's the elitist cycling ego that's the problem as per usual here. You should be proud that cycling has had such a spotlight shone on it,I for one am humbled by the spectacle we have just seen. People can't help passion and having spent many years on the continent watching the tour I would vouch that we were pretty respectful.

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Sub5orange [96 posts] 1 year ago
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I was at Holmes Moss today. In my section there was no impeding of riders. The athmosphere was amazing. The crowds immense. Britain can be proud of this tour.( I am not British ). Such crowds will always include a couple of simple minds wherever the tour goes. Barriers are not the answer, and only punish the majority. Well done Yorkshire.

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7thGalaxy [44 posts] 1 year ago
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It's been like this for so many years (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1DwSICLGBI) why are they all moaning about it now?

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nicholassmith [92 posts] 1 year ago
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I was watching it and for the most part the crowd seemed very sensible, but the riders were quite quick to tell people off which is fair really. Looked mostly like people were blinded by looking at their cameras not the road.

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Colin Peyresourde [1690 posts] 1 year ago
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Saw some spectator take a shoulder from the rider. The spectator went down like a sack of spuds, but the cyclist careered across the road.

Kittel seemed to waving someone away at some point, and one of the Garmin riders was actively swatting away iPhones.

It's difficult. It is nice to see so many people watching the race. I don't think I've ever seen a stage packed like that before. The spectators want their moment, but with so many its hard to get the space. I'm glad nothing too untoward happened in the end, and no rider was exceptionally affected. I thought what transpired was pretty amazing all-in-all.

Actually, on one of the climbs where riders touches wheels, the peloton compressed and you could the bulge of cyclists pushing into the spectators, and some poor onlooker took a tumble backward down the dale, arse-over-tit.

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Flying Heron [54 posts] 1 year ago
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I'm afraid that's part and parcel of the tour, let's not forget the real reason why it's the most supported sport in the world, getting close is a privilege and in no other sport possible.

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chiv30 [986 posts] 1 year ago
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Colin Peyresourde wrote:

Saw some spectator take a shoulder from the rider. The spectator went down like a sack of spuds, but the cyclist careered across the road.

Kittel seemed to waving someone away at some point, and one of the Garmin riders was actively swatting away iPhones.

It's difficult. It is nice to see so many people watching the race. I don't think I've ever seen a stage packed like that before. The spectators want their moment, but with so many its hard to get the space. I'm glad nothing too untoward happened in the end, and no rider was exceptionally affected. I thought what transpired was pretty amazing all-in-all.

Actually, on one of the climbs where riders touches wheels, the peloton compressed and you could the bulge of cyclists pushing into the spectators, and some poor onlooker took a tumble backward down the dale, arse-over-tit.

It was Nava but he wasn't swatting phones he was actively pulling them out of pols hands then throwing them which is out of order tbh.

From what I saw the crowds were better behaved than they are in the alps

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Beaufort [270 posts] 1 year ago
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I'd suggest that the issue with a (very) few individual fools is that they may be new to bike race watching and don't know the way it goes down. During the womens tour in Bedfordshire, I had to tell a guy to get his toddler out of the road because the bikes will be using all of the road. I was told to fuck off.

It's the fans who should know better - those who have been to a bike race before - who should both set an example to the idiots and tell them what they're doing wrong. After that, it's on them.