Video: patchnride fixes punctures in 60secs

New gizmo aims to fix flats quickly and without the need to remove the wheel

by David Arthur   June 26, 2014  

No one likes getting punctures when cycling, so we’re always interested in any product that claims to avoid them, or make fixing a flat much quicker. patchnride offers the latter, and claims to be able to fix a punctured clincher or tubular tyre without even having to remove the wheel from the bike.

So how does it work then? Quite simply, the device injects a patch into the tyre via the hole caused by the offending thorn, flint or glass shard. With the patch inserted, you can inflate the tyre and the patch fixes the flat from inside the tyre. patchnride reckon you can patch any hole up to 3mm.

They claim to be able to mend a flat tyre in 60 seconds, which is certainly a bit quicker than removing the wheel and changing the inner tube. Although Greg LeMond recently gave a demonstration of how quickly he managed to change an inner tube. 

Judging by the slick video presentation, because that’s all we’ve got to go on at the moment (we’re going to try and get one in for test), the device injects an adhesive patch into a cavity between the tyre and inner tube, created by squeezing the tyre together. Inflation bonds the patch to the inner tube.

Finding a hole in a tyre can be tricky, but patchnride have thought of that. The ‘leak detector’ is a a liquid solution and a cloth that you wipe over the tyre leaving a liquid on the tyre's surface. Bubbles show the location of the puncture.

Unlike other tube prevention measures like Slime inner tubes for example, this approach adds no extra weight to your wheels and with the device weighing just 100g, it might seem a preferable alternative to carrying a couple of spare tubes. They say it works with any bike, road, mountain or cruisers, as long as they have an inner tube. That means it works with tubular tyres as well.

patchnride are currently only selling the the kit through their website, where it costs $25, but they’re currently offering 50% off on pre-orders. Availability is expected in September 2014. Find out more at https://patchnride.com/

22 user comments

Oldest firstNewest firstBest rated

Finding the leak without removing the tyre and tube will be a huge problem when using this tool, despite its "leak detector" method. I could type a longish pamphlet listing all the reasons why.

Have a nice day.

DavidC's picture

posted by DavidC [67 posts]
26th June 2014 - 9:11

95 Likes

DavidC wrote:
Finding the leak without removing the tyre and tube will be a huge problem when using this tool, despite its "leak detector" method. I could type a longish pamphlet listing all the reasons why.

Starting with not all flat tyres are accompanied by a cut in the tyre?
So you would still need a spare inner tube etc.
Then there is would it work in the cold/wet?

posted by SideBurn [838 posts]
26th June 2014 - 9:29

60 Likes

All seems a bit too good to be true. Unless you've got some ruddy great thorn or carpet tack stuck in your tyre, how are you supposed to find the hole without removing the entire tube?

posted by Yennings [224 posts]
26th June 2014 - 9:38

62 Likes

Not that I do, but for those that ride regularly with tubs, (and assuming this actually works) it could be pretty handy. If you don't have to remove the tyre, then the there's no benefit to clinchers.

posted by robthehungrymonkey [42 posts]
26th June 2014 - 9:46

77 Likes

Looks pretty handy for commuting, where being able to quickly fix a puncture without getting covered in tyre grime and still get to the office on time is a major benefit.

I agree that it might not work for every puncture - but it'd be a nice quick fix to have for the punctures that it does work on.

posted by GrahamSt [99 posts]
26th June 2014 - 9:57

61 Likes

pretty pointless for tubular's when u can carry a 75ml can of vitorria pitstop which will seal a puncture, inflate the tyre and help prevent further punctures and will take around 60 seconds to do so (i carry 2 one for front one for the rear)

even if u can fit the patch in 60 seconds you still have to inflate the tyre and you could still get more punctures on your ride

posted by kev-s [57 posts]
26th June 2014 - 10:19

56 Likes

agree with most posters that although this may work. It's success rate would be low unless every puncture you had was a huge nail or thorn. Most punctures are by a small flint or tiny bit of metal that requires you to take the tyre off to run your fingers on the inside to find it. If you dont and simply use this tool you've basically pushed said article in the tyre to then give you more punctures along the way. Then how many patches does the tool supply? What if its a pinch flat bc your rim tape failed?

posted by toothache90 [35 posts]
26th June 2014 - 10:23

53 Likes

It might not be appropriate for every type of puncture, but as a quick fix on a TT, tri or while late for work it could sure save some time and some tears as rider after rider zoom past. I would like to see road.cc test it before spending my dosh first.
I would prob only use as a temp fix.
On a side note, its not to dissimilar to my roadside puncture kit for my motorbike.

posted by Mart [106 posts]
26th June 2014 - 11:09

63 Likes

I've been in touch with them and they are pretty confident that it will be good for almost all punctures, but I guess they would say that.

More worrying for me though is this, if it doesn't fix all punctures I will still need to carry some patches and a spare tube etc. so this is something extra to carry, secondly, the patch pods retail at $10-$12 and fix one puncture, that is a hefty price tag for a single puncture.

I love the idea, but it needs to be cheaper and fix every puncture.

posted by mikeprytherch [219 posts]
26th June 2014 - 12:51

59 Likes

This device is a joke,even if the offending hole/puncture is located and the end inserted through the tyre presumably the inner tube will be flat inside rendering the whole idea totally useless as the liquid/patch will just spurt out over some random flaccid crumpled part of the tube and not in/on the offending puncture and the chances of it actually successfully sticking and sealing are zero
Also the chances of the hole in the tyre being in alignment with the hole in the inner tube is very unlikely
its a ridiculous idea and it will never ever work
i'll stick to taking inner tubes out thankyou very much,i suggest everyone else does the same before investing in this chocolate teapot
great idea guys Applause
next

posted by Rich71 [29 posts]
26th June 2014 - 13:27

46 Likes

Rich71 wrote:
This device is a joke,even if the offending hole/puncture is located and the end inserted through the tyre presumably the inner tube will be flat inside rendering the whole idea totally useless as the liquid/patch will just spurt out over some random flaccid crumpled part of the tube and not in/on the offending puncture and the chances of it actually successfully sticking and sealing are zero
Also the chances of the hole in the tyre being in alignment with the hole in the inner tube is very unlikely
its a ridiculous idea and it will never ever work
i'll stick to taking inner tubes out thankyou very much,i suggest everyone else does the same before investing in this chocolate teapot
great idea guys Applause
next

You've tried it then? We're going to try and get it in for testing before we make up our minds whether it's any good or not. Y'know, it might just work

David Arthur's picture

posted by David Arthur [1625 posts]
26th June 2014 - 13:54

41 Likes

Unless racing... Wheel off, tyre off, tube out, hand around the inside of tube, find cause of air loss, remove it, new tube in, pump, refit tyre, CO2, old tube in pocket, bosh, on you way.

in the comfort of home patch the tube and replace the CO2 with air, whilst drinking a cold beer you bought with the money you saved from not buying this gizmo.

Really, though?

posted by workhard [388 posts]
26th June 2014 - 13:56

36 Likes

You've tried it then? We're going to try and get it in for testing before we make up our minds whether it's any good or not. Y'know, it might just work

Good luck with that then
Yeah,you are absolutely correct,y'know it might just work,on the other hand it might y'know..just not work,its 50/50
but you've got to ask yourself this question,do i feel lucky? well do ya...?
Can i recommend you carry out your test in realistic field conditions to illustrate your deluded misplaced confidence in this pile of 3rd rate QVC shopping channel disposable useless tat?
ie; 35 miles away from home,middle of nowhere(not your lovely bike shed/workshop in your back garden) and most importantly NO spare inner tubes
I'll let you off with 50quid to get a taxi back home
Let us know how you get on
cheers buddy
Wave

posted by Rich71 [29 posts]
26th June 2014 - 14:35

48 Likes

My my. Some angry folk out today. If someone actually solved cold fusion half of Road.CC would be ranting about the loss of coal and nuclear fission. Big Grin

Punctures are not difficult to find. The idea that the inner tube hole doesn't align with the outer tube hole is daft. What happens then? Is the inner tube freely floating with the tyre? Silly

I'm happy to give this invention a go. Good on them! Don't let the Nimbps (not in my back pocket) brigade put you off. They'd probably have dismissed clipless as an unnecessary fad.

One problem: it won't deal with splits or broken valves so a spare tube is always necessary.

Silly me. You're probably right....

MercuryOne's picture

posted by MercuryOne [1072 posts]
26th June 2014 - 15:20

55 Likes

Rich71 wrote:
presumably the inner tube will be flat inside rendering the whole idea totally useless as the liquid/patch will just spurt out over some random flaccid crumpled part of the tube and not in/on the offending puncture and the chances of it actually successfully sticking and sealing are zero
Also the chances of the hole in the tyre being in alignment with the hole in the inner tube is very unlikely

Hmm. Usually when I fix punctures I pump a bit of air in first to find the hole, if it's totally flat, which it isn't necessarily. So I guess you'd do the same and pump it up before injecting the magic stuff.

And if you pump it up enough I'd have thought that the holes in the tube and the tyre would more or less line up, if you haven't had to take the tyre off.

I do see some potential pitfalls, mainly to do with whatever gave you the flat still lurking in the tyre and how well this 'leak detector' works in the real world. Interesting idea though. Not sure why you're quite so wound up by it!

posted by Chuck [397 posts]
26th June 2014 - 15:21

49 Likes

Hmm, reserving judgement for people with more money and time to review. But like others I find it is the tiny slivers of glass that cover city streets a problem. Eventually you will find one just lying in at the wrong angle to dig itself into the tyre. How exactly doe I dig out the offending silicon shard? This normally needs to be found on the inside and pushed back out again.



Suffering from Low Cadence.

bikeboy76's picture

posted by bikeboy76 [1356 posts]
26th June 2014 - 19:25

36 Likes

David Arthur wrote:
Rich71 wrote:
This device is a joke,even if the offending hole/puncture is located and the end inserted through the tyre presumably the inner tube will be flat inside rendering the whole idea totally useless as the liquid/patch will just spurt out over some random flaccid crumpled part of the tube and not in/on the offending puncture and the chances of it actually successfully sticking and sealing are zero
Also the chances of the hole in the tyre being in alignment with the hole in the inner tube is very unlikely
its a ridiculous idea and it will never ever work
i'll stick to taking inner tubes out thankyou very much,i suggest everyone else does the same before investing in this chocolate teapot
great idea guys Applause
next

You've tried it then? We're going to try and get it in for testing before we make up our minds whether it's any good or not. Y'know, it might just work

You're new to the internet, ain't you, boy? We don't like your fancy thinking round here.

posted by andyp [975 posts]
26th June 2014 - 19:49

38 Likes

Not every puncture involves penetration of the tyre. Can't see how this would work with Snake bites for example.

posted by The Sooper [3 posts]
26th June 2014 - 23:43

38 Likes

I watched the demo video about how it works - seems all right in my opinion. But it needs real world testing and no, it wont fix every eventuality in flats but it could just be a pretty good tool to have for the majority of flats. Ive never had to remove a wheel to fix a flat on all my rides, just use exposed the puncture area and stick a patch on it then pump back up to 110psi then continue on with ride. Ive been lucky. This tool could be pretty good if the price is right though.

posted by Critchio [115 posts]
27th June 2014 - 9:13

22 Likes

Reserve judgement until it's been on the market for a year! in the meantime carry a spare tube and patches.

posted by Mostyn [407 posts]
27th June 2014 - 10:34

21 Likes

Let's wait for the test results. All we have here is an advertisement.

posted by nortonpdj [23 posts]
29th June 2014 - 11:04

9 Likes

Not totally convinced but at the same time not prepared to dismiss the idea out of hand.

I think I would be tempted to purchase when it has a UK distributor depending on price etc. I would also carry it in addition too rather than instead of spare tube and/or scabs until such time as it had dealt with at least a couple of punctures.

posted by levermonkey [378 posts]
29th June 2014 - 14:56

4 Likes