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Ilegal parking, close passes, left turns in rider's path and eating and drinking at wheel feature in latest YouTube clip...

A York cyclist who last month posted a YouTube video showing poor cycling by fellow riders has turned his attention to the city’s motorists.

The anonymous cyclist’s latest compilation includes headcamera footage of cars parked across cycle lanes, drivers turning left across the rider’s path, jumping red traffic lights and several close passes.

The latter include one incident in which the cyclist is squeezed between an illegally parked car and a National Express coach that is overtaking him.

According to the York Press, the man, who goes by the YouTube user name CarefulCyclist, posted the video because he wants motorists to ask themselves: “Is the additional risk I am taking worth it?

"My second aim is to shame those road users who think it is OK to put others at risk.

"Drivers who choose to drive with a cup, food or phone in their hand are a danger to all other road users and should rightly be embarrassed by their selfishness. Drivers who pass too closely are in breach of Rule 163 of the Highway Code."

Referring to that incident with the National Express coach, he said: "At that point, I was scared. The camera has a wide angle lens and doesn’t really convey just how small that gap was."

Some commenters to the video suggest that the cyclist doesn’t seem to anticipate the actions of some drivers adequately, for example when a bus turns right onto the road he is riding on.

The sharp-eyed among you will notice that the video starts with footage of a cyclist attempting to undertake a left-turning vehicle that was featured in the previous video on poor cycling.

Presumably that’s included here since the rider doing the filming feels the driver should have anticipated what the cyclist was going to do by seeing him in his passenger side wing mirror.

Here’s the earlier video on York cyclists.

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

50 comments

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fennesz [138 posts] 2 years ago
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CarefulCyclist needs a proper hobby.

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bikebot [1916 posts] 2 years ago
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Well, that was 184 seconds I won't get back.

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Portex [12 posts] 2 years ago
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All part of the rough and tumble of riding in traffic. Happens all the time.

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enigmaman [24 posts] 2 years ago
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Not much to see there. Just run of the mill stuff. Not sure what purpose these items serve.

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gareth2510 [167 posts] 2 years ago
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And the point is?
Looks the norm to me

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Wookie [234 posts] 2 years ago
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My daily commute

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Cervelo12 [77 posts] 2 years ago
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Pointless article and video.

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Angelfishsolo [132 posts] 2 years ago
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This is why I don't use cycle lanes!

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teaboy [311 posts] 2 years ago
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gareth2510 wrote:

And the point is?
Looks the norm to me

Isn't that exactly the point though? Why is driving like that seen in this video, and on the roads every single day accepted as being 'the norm'? Much of it was illegal, dangerous, careless or at least inconsiderate. Much of it is bad (but sadly all too common) use of bad infrastructure which creates danger for vulnerable road users. The danger can and should be engineered out of our road network.

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spence129 [21 posts] 2 years ago
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Articles like this need to be on the daily mail site on not a cycling website where everyone knows what cyclists contend with. The average DM reader will no doubt be part of the "cyclists shouldn't be on the road gang" and they will justify that because of the stupidity of the minority, if they could apply that same logic when seeing videos like this then the roads would be a happier, safer place.

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mrmo [2074 posts] 2 years ago
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Portex wrote:

All part of the rough and tumble of riding in traffic. Happens all the time.

And if you want people to ride bikes? Do you think making cycling out to be some extreme sport benefits anyone?

Maybe the point is that you get inoculated to crap driving, doesn't make it right, doesn't help those of a nervous nature who want to cycle.

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OldRidgeback [2620 posts] 2 years ago
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The close pass by the coach shows particularly poor driving. A copy of this clip should be sent to the company, along with a date and time. It shouldn't be hard to identify the driver. A responsible/well run company should take action, as drivers like this are more likely to cause crashes, and those crashes will cost the employer lots of money.

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NeilXDavis [122 posts] 2 years ago
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Yep TBH we all see it all day long in any town or city up and down the UK.

History shows x amount of people need to die before anything is changed in this country. With cycling x is a large number.

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pz1800 [24 posts] 2 years ago
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Sadly, obeying the traffic rules as a cyclist does nothing to protect you; you are still victim to drivers like these.

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farrell [1950 posts] 2 years ago
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None of this happened or ever happens, apparently.

It's just exaggeration...

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jon_boi [5 posts] 2 years ago
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Angelfishsolo wrote:

This is why I don't use cycle lanes!

I will never use a cycle lane.
- full of debris and drain covers
- poorly maintained
- give drivers the impression they can pass you when more often than not they'll still need to go wide to miss you
- Makes you harder to see by tucking you further up against the kerb
etc etc.

I'll only use a properly segregated bike lane and if there is a bike lane on the side of the road I'll ride a good meter into the actual lane so they know I'm not using the cycle lane.

Raaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!

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shay cycles [324 posts] 2 years ago
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Obeying the rules may or may not protect you but not obeying them can increase your levels of risk (before the flurry of questions an example would be that by not following the rules other road users are less able to predict your movements and behave accordingly).

You can protect yourself by clever riding whilst staying within the rules - road positioning, communication etc. (for example a dangerous close pass can often be prevented if you are aware of the approaching vehicle soon enough and position yourself appropriately and in good time). I know it isn't popular with many experienced cyclists but some proper training is as useful to a cyclist as the Advanced Driving courses are for motorists.

These articles do highlight the risks on the road but in the discussions we have the opportunity to show that things can be better and that you can do a great deal to minimise risks - or of course we have the opportunity to complain, grumble about what we can't do and persuade ourselves that it is so dangerour out there that the bike should be kept safely beside the couch - we have a choice here!

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StoopidUserName [171 posts] 2 years ago
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Good to see this being covered on a cycling website as well as on every national and local paper on the web as well as many hundreds of forum posts.

Oh whats that? It isn't? It's being totally ignored outside the cycling world?

But wont that mean that the average cyclist reputation remains massively tarnished while the average motorists reputation remains intact? Did no one forsee this? Did no one point this out last month? Didn't anyone say hold on, this guy has posted hundreds of videos of bad driving that hasn't been picked up by the media...and one bad cycling video that has...somethings very wrong here????????????

/Sarcasm off

I repeat what I said last time. This guy has no idea of the damage he's done.

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vanmildert [50 posts] 2 years ago
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Admittedly some of these aren't a such big deal but cars parked routinely in cycle lanes should be easy to police. Despite the fact that York has a high proportion of cyclists City of York Council seem to do nothing to enforce this whastoever.

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oozaveared [937 posts] 2 years ago
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shay cycles wrote:

Obeying the rules may or may not protect you but not obeying them can increase your levels of risk (before the flurry of questions an example would be that by not following the rules other road users are less able to predict your movements and behave accordingly).

You can protect yourself by clever riding whilst staying within the rules - road positioning, communication etc. (for example a dangerous close pass can often be prevented if you are aware of the approaching vehicle soon enough and position yourself appropriately and in good time). I know it isn't popular with many experienced cyclists but some proper training is as useful to a cyclist as the Advanced Driving courses are for motorists.

These articles do highlight the risks on the road but in the discussions we have the opportunity to show that things can be better and that you can do a great deal to minimise risks - or of course we have the opportunity to complain, grumble about what we can't do and persuade ourselves that it is so dangerour out there that the bike should be kept safely beside the couch - we have a choice here!

I am an Advanced Driver and an experienced cyclist. In general I think it is better to observe the rules of the road for the very reasons of predictability that you mention. I wouldn't however be overly dogmatic about it. Sometimes you have to use common sense.

EG do you have to cycle round a mini roundabout mound (a necessarily slow acute turn near white paint with limited ability to signal intent) or if it's safe just take the shortest safest route inside the mound and get the manoever over with?

Take driving. It has similar common sense dilemmas. Let's say you are behind a slower moving lorry. There's a huge queue behind. You can see it's clear to overtake. It's safe to overtake. The lorry is doing 45mph on a 60mph road. Should you only pass the lorry never exceeding 60mph or should you following common sense rules on overtaking hang back to increase visibility inside and out side the lorry then accelerate to a an overtake speed so as to spend the shortest time possible on the wrong side of the road. Common sense tells me that if I am to overtake (and I should according to the HC) then I should get that monoever over with as soon as poss even if I break the speed limit for a couple of seconds.

I know rules is rules is a popular refrain but there are times when you need to use your noggin and deal with what's in front of you sensibly.

I have actually seen the "rules is rules" approach taken to extreme. an Ambulance with blue lights flashing and siren wailing stuck behind a car at traffic lights for over a minute because the car driver would have to move over the line on red (even though still perfectly safe) to allow the Ambulance to get by.

"Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the strict obedience only of a fool"
Douglas Bader I think but it was oft cited on my commissioning course many moons ago. ie Don't let a general rule get in the way of doing the right thing in the circumstances you face. Other general rules must still apply of course ie that what you do in contravention of a specific rule (speeding to overtake a lorry more quickly) has a proper objective (increasing the safety of the manoever). It's not a recipe for a wholesale disregard of rules.

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bike_food [169 posts] 2 years ago
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Watching stuff like this makes me glad I don't use a camera when out riding.
I can imagine if you're the sort of person to dwell on stuff this could take over your life, getting home after each ride, finding the footage, deciding whether it's good/bad & worth uploading.
I guess you'll build up an even deeper resentment of drivers in the process too as you can replay all the bad stuff that happens to you.
Fair play to the people who do this, each to their own but I'd rather forget most of the bad sh*t I encounter.
The roads are full of impatient people whose journey time is more important than yours or anyone else they encounter safety most of which would probably find these videos amusing.

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adrianoconnor [83 posts] 2 years ago
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Me too. In fact, I once got a camera for using on my commute, as a gift from somebody who really meant well, but I won't use it. When I'm riding:

#1 priority is to stay safe, and arrive in one piece
#2 priority is to enjoy the ride (which includes riding fast and getting PBs, of course)

Dwelling on dangerous behaviour won't help either of those goals, and if I get knocked off, the new #1 priority would be 'getting back on the bike' -- it would absolutely not be 'getting revenge on the driver' (which would be even more all-consuming than posting video of near-misses).

And when I do get cut up by a driver who mis-judges how quickly I'm approaching, or when someone passes by too close, I just let it go. Even when I'm queuing in traffic and a car is beeping me to get out of the way (bizarrely happens once every few months on the same stretch of road -- the cars never, ever have anywhere to go -- we're literally queuing through the city centre), I'll just give the driver a big smile and a thumbs up before disappearing off down the road.

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vbvb [593 posts] 2 years ago
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His bike one was all over the national press. We should not be rewarding him with this coverage (and I suspect he is aware of the coverage and feels excited about it) unless this one gets the same national coverage, as he intended. At least that way we'd not be irritated by the memory of his unhelpful naivety.

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ribena [179 posts] 2 years ago
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York drivers mistakes - shrugged off as normal.

York cyclists mistakes - cause outrage and ranting in papers.

"can we have better infrastructure, or tougher penalties for drivers?"
NO - you need to get your own house in order.

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yenrod [106 posts] 2 years ago
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That last one still kills me' - puts me on the floor...  24

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jacknorell [966 posts] 2 years ago
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Those last two overtakes were pretty scary... the lorry as bad as the coach really.

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notfastenough [3679 posts] 2 years ago
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adrianoconnor wrote:

Me too. In fact, I once got a camera for using on my commute, as a gift from somebody who really meant well, but I won't use it. When I'm riding:

#1 priority is to stay safe, and arrive in one piece
#2 priority is to enjoy the ride (which includes riding fast and getting PBs, of course)

Dwelling on dangerous behaviour won't help either of those goals, and if I get knocked off, the new #1 priority would be 'getting back on the bike' -- it would absolutely not be 'getting revenge on the driver' (which would be even more all-consuming than posting video of near-misses).

And when I do get cut up by a driver who mis-judges how quickly I'm approaching, or when someone passes by too close, I just let it go. Even when I'm queuing in traffic and a car is beeping me to get out of the way (bizarrely happens once every few months on the same stretch of road -- the cars never, ever have anywhere to go -- we're literally queuing through the city centre), I'll just give the driver a big smile and a thumbs up before disappearing off down the road.

My priorities are exactly the same, but the camera is a great idea purely to dispel the "my word against yours" scenario in the event of an incident. Brilliantly, you can even combine it with use of Strava (or whatever). Thus:

Angryman: "You came out of nowhere, weaved all over the road, and were going far too quickly!"*
You: "Nope."

Police or the courts get involved, and you turn up with video evidence, GPS logs of your speed, and a smug grin.

A happy byproduct is that it also makes me swear less, since I let the camera do it's job and I don't get as angry. I've never even transferred any footage to my laptop except when testing the camera angle and position, and certainly haven't uploaded to the web.

*Insert expletives as necessary!  1

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oozaveared [937 posts] 2 years ago
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notfastenough wrote:
adrianoconnor wrote:

My priorities are exactly the same, but the camera is a great idea purely to dispel the "my word against yours" scenario in the event of an incident. Brilliantly, you can even combine it with use of Strava (or whatever). Thus:

Angryman: "You came out of nowhere, weaved all over the road, and were going far too quickly!"*
You: "Nope."

Police or the courts get involved, and you turn up with video evidence, GPS logs of your speed, and a smug grin.

A happy byproduct is that it also makes me swear less, since I let the camera do it's job and I don't get as angry. I've never even transferred any footage to my laptop except when testing the camera angle and position, and certainly haven't uploaded to the web.

*Insert expletives as necessary!  1

I agree. I got a camera after being deliberately run into the side of the road forcing me to stop then hosed down with a juice bottle by the passenger. I reported it to the police who were great and did actually prosecute the driver (the copper was a cyclist). Couldn't do anything about the passenger but if I had a camera he would have been as clear as day.

Since then I have a few very minor incidents in heavy commuter traffic. in particular one guy shouting abuse from his open window as I quite properly overtook stationary traffic on the outside. I'd stopped and tucked into the lane of traffic as oncoming traffic approached and he took the opportunity to start a rant about why I should be on the inside. I have my camera on the bars as I don't wear a helmet. I just pointed the camera at him and he shut up immediately.

I happen to think that most of the time if drivers like this thought they were on camera they would behave differently.

The American used to have a saying that went "An armed society is a polite society" I don't actually think that is true in practice with guns but I do think that if motorists in general thought that most cyclists had a camera they might mind their Ps & Qs a bit more.

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northstar [1108 posts] 2 years ago
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Tell us something we don't know?

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bobinski [232 posts] 2 years ago
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This is a non article and pretty pointless really. I love the reviews here and the shared views of experienced cycling campaigners but this type of article, like the recent Canadian one, is just thoroughly worthless and ultimately pretty depressing.

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