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Win prizes and money fot helping to create innovative new sports products that could be seen next in Decathlon

Have you ever thought you could design a gadget, widget or doo-dah better than anyone else out there? Ever had an idea you know would change the world? Now’s your chance to come up with the sporting product of dreams, with a design competition that could see your creation on the shelves at Decathlon stores worldwide.

Open Oxylane, a crowdsourcing website owned by Decathlon, has launched a site where amateur designers and the public can work together to design the newest sports products. The co-working platform allows you to transform your ideas into real-life merchandise using a fraction of the time, ressources, skills and know-how one might have previously needed to get something to market.

Under the Open Oxylane model, the community decides which projects and solutions to take further in the production process. Users can interact and give their opinion at each stage of the creative process, from defining functions to selecting materials and colours and choosing a name and even the price.

Everyone’s actions, whether an idea, vote or comment will be taken into consideration, while also winning prizes.

So far, creations have included a future unbreakable ping-pong ball or the football which comes back on its own to the middle of the pitch.

Members submitting ideas have 30 days to convince the community members and get supportign votes. The most popular ideas are then evaluated by the site team who decide whether it’s a viable concept.

The creative process is a collaborative effort with the team and other users, who can submit ideas at every stage, for design, name, packaging and more.

And those with the most ideas can even earn money for them.

So if you’ve got a cycling product idea - and we’re told that most of the great ideas submitted are cycling relating, get clicking and perhaps make it a reality.

Click here for more information.

After an unpromising start, having to be bribed by her parents to learn to ride without stabilisers, Sarah became rather keener on cycling in her university years, and was eventually persuaded to upgrade to proper road cycling by the prospect of a shiny red Italian bike, which she promptly destroyed by trapping a pair of knickers in the rear derailleur. Sarah writes about about cycling every weekend on road.cc.