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Plans for street in Hinckley do include footway parking spaces, but locals are worried there won't be enough to go around...

Residents of a street in a Leicestershire town are opposing council plans to introduce a shared use footway and cycleway – because they are worried it would prevent them from parking on the pavement.

The Leicester Mercury says that more than 100 residents of Netherley Road in Hinckley have signed a petition to oppose the facility, and that they were due to meet with council officials last Friday to discuss the situation.

The petition was organised by Ann Pendlebury, who said: “People have parked this way for a long time and, with my partner, Dale, working in Cadeby and me commuting 25 miles, we need a car each and don't have a drive.

"If they put the cycle lane in, we'll be competing for a smaller number of spaces.

"It's an old-fashioned road where the elderly are looked after and everyone talks or at least nods to each other.

"This will result in the breakdown of this community.

"I also think it would lead to people getting rid of their front gardens to create drives.

"That's going to increase the likelihood of flooding, which is already an issue for some."

The picture accompanying the Leicester Mercury’s article shows cars parked on driveways outside a number of houses on the street, but none on the pavement. Google Street View shows a few cars on the footway, but most parked up on forecourts outside houses.

Rule 244 of the Highway Code says:

You MUST NOT park partially or wholly on the pavement in London, and should not do so elsewhere unless signs permit it. Parking on the pavement can obstruct and seriously inconvenience pedestrians, people in wheelchairs or with visual impairments and people with prams or pushchairs.

Plans on Leicestershire County Council’s website show that pavement parking is part of the proposal for Netherley Road.

The council says that among other things, the project will result in:

creating shared use footways/ cycleways on existing footways, where necessary widening footways within the highway boundary

introducing partial footway parking on Netherley Road to identify areas where parking can take place to prevent obstruction from parked vehicles.

This plan highlights the position of the proposed parking bays, and there will be signs at either end of the road that read: “Vehicles may be marked partially on the verge and footway in marked bays” and “End of area where vehicles may be parked partially on the verge or footway.”

Peter Osborne, Leicestershire County Council’s spokesman for transport, told the Leicester Mercury: "We welcome comments from the residents of Netherley Road as we are really keen to hear all views on the proposed traffic improvement scheme for Hinckley.

"We recognise changes can be made to improve congestion and traffic-flow in Hinckley and make access easier for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians alike.

"This should, in turn, help boost the town centre, encourage further investment and make it easier for people to cycle, walk and use public transport."

Consultation on the plans closes on Thursday 27 March.

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

49 comments

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cat1commuter [1421 posts] 2 years ago
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The residents' objections quoted in the article sound a bit off, but council's plan looks rubbish. Footways shared with cyclists are the worst form of cycling provision. As far as I can tell, apart from moving some lampposts and street furniture, they're only going to apply some paint to mark parking bays, and add some shared use signs. They're not creating a cycle lane. Broken Britain!

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jacknorell [963 posts] 2 years ago
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Looks more like an A road than a residential road... Council plans are sh**e, they should narrow the road and put some greenery in, some benches, etc...

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notfastenough [3674 posts] 2 years ago
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To be fair, I'd still use the road anyway in this scenario. Pedestrians really aren't used to anything faster moving being on same path as them, and that's just the ones without earphones in.

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bambergbike [89 posts] 2 years ago
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As somebody whose life is happily car-free I can't profess to understand the residents, but I would probably be very happy to sign their petition if I was a local. I'd rather cycle on-road than off-road in residential areas (provided, of course, that the roads in residential areas are civilized places to cycle, with appropriate traffic calming and low speed limits that are (almost) universally adhered to. If the residents want cyclists to use the road rather than segregated provision, they need to accept the need to make the road attractive to all cyclists. In a sense there should be a natural alliance between campaigning residents and campaigning cyclists, since cyclists need civilized places to cycle and residents (even those who are not cyclists and whose children don't cycle) need civilized places to live. If this alliance isn't working, something has gone wrong somewhere (entrenched/unfounded anti-cyclist prejudice?) and at least one of the two groups needs to rethink its PR strategy.

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JonD [400 posts] 2 years ago
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"I also think it would lead to people getting rid of their front gardens to create drives.

Judging by Streetview, it's a bit late raising that as an objection..

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bambergbike [89 posts] 2 years ago
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jacknorell wrote:

Looks more like an A road than a residential road... Council plans are sh**e, they should narrow the road and put some greenery in, some benches, etc...

Completely agree in theory - the road look much too wide - but I use a route almost daily where this has been done quite badly, and it's really rather annoying. The greenery (grass) has been placed in the middle of the road. Busses and trucks have to stay behind cyclists (safe, but it's not much fun cycling uphill with a bus huffing and puffing right behind you) and cars can only get past if the driver is extremely rude (very rare) or if the cyclist pulls in to the kerb and stops to let them squeeze by (so the uphill cyclist loses momentum). It's not terrible, it's probably much nicer than what this road looks like at the moment, but it's not great either and it tempts drivers into squeezing past just before the stretch of road that is traffic calmed with green grassy islands in the middle. I thought my local bus drivers were great because they don't do this to me, but then I was a passenger on the local bus service one day and saw an elderly cyclist being overtaken much too closely and realized that the only reason the bus drivers don't mess with me is that I just don't give them enough room to do anything really stupid.

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Neil753 [447 posts] 2 years ago
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Every scheme that antagonises local residents launches a thousand punishment passes. The photos have been taken during the day when most people are at work, so give a false impression of parking need. We've all got to understand that many young adults share houses with parents, or share houses with their peers, so the parking space required per house is increasing all the time, so we shouldn't dismiss these residents' concerns.

Far better would be to change the speed limit to 20mph and just place bollards half way down the street to create a "quietway". Link a few quietways together and you suddenly have a network.

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Jimbonic [136 posts] 2 years ago
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Yep, looks fine to cycle on the road as it is from the photo. I'd rather that than the confusion of cycling amongst parked cars and pedestrians.

I did enjoy this great non-sequitur, though:
"It's an old-fashioned road where the elderly are looked after and everyone talks or at least nods to each other.

"This will result in the breakdown of this community."

????

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bikebot [1890 posts] 2 years ago
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So what the council is proposing is shared use that still has some parking places? Fun, door zone and pedestrians. And I love a shared path that has an access ramp for parking every other house, those regular dips and bumps help keep me alert!

I think I see a "cycling facility of the month" in the making. As suggested by others, look at creating a quietway. If I were ever there, I'd ride on the road anyway and the residents might even appreciate a slightly more family friendly neighbourhood.

And in general, I'd rather local authorities spent the little they have on improving dangerous junctions instead of relatively safe straight roads.

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jacknorell [963 posts] 2 years ago
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Neil753 wrote:

...We've all got to understand that many young adults share houses with parents, or share houses with their peers, so the parking space required per house is increasing all the time...

There's something very wrong with that trend, not that you're wrong.

Fully agree with putting bollards in the middle to stop through-traffic.

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Bikebikebike [221 posts] 2 years ago
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Neil753 wrote:

Every scheme that antagonises local residents launches a thousand punishment passes. The photos have been taken during the day when most people are at work, so give a false impression of parking need. We've all got to understand that many young adults share houses with parents, or share houses with their peers, so the parking space required per house is increasing all the time, so we shouldn't dismiss these residents' concerns.

Oh bollocks to this. On-street parking is just another way that non-drivers subsidise people with cars.

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FluffyKittenofT... [1191 posts] 2 years ago
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Bikebikebike wrote:
Neil753 wrote:

Every scheme that antagonises local residents launches a thousand punishment passes. The photos have been taken during the day when most people are at work, so give a false impression of parking need. We've all got to understand that many young adults share houses with parents, or share houses with their peers, so the parking space required per house is increasing all the time, so we shouldn't dismiss these residents' concerns.

Oh bollocks to this. On-street parking is just another way that non-drivers subsidise people with cars.

While I agree in theory with this, I think its a lost cause as those who feel entitled to such a subisidy are far too powerful politically to take on. People with cars now think they have a human right to park right outside their homes (I wish they'd show a bit more gratitude to those of us who make more space by _not_ having a car...logically we ought to be able to charge a fee for the use of the space we thus free up!)

But I also think Neil753 is right that it would be far better in any case to just make the road itself safer for cycling, via strict speed limits and (best of all) partially bollarding it off to stop through traffic.

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pmanc [203 posts] 2 years ago
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Neil753 wrote:

...the parking space required per house is increasing all the time...

But that's the problem, this isn't sustainable. The requirement eats into the safe public space which would have previously been available for walking and playing. And still people behave as if the world owes them as much parking space as they feel they need.

Many of us know that residences in town often don't come with bike storage nowadays, but we don't automatically feel we have a right to berate the council about it. What if I wanted to build a (van-sized) secure bike store on the public pavement outside my house? Is that OK?

Can I demand the council subsidises my "requirement" for a private jet and provides me with somewhere to land it and store it?

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FluffyKittenofT... [1191 posts] 2 years ago
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pmanc wrote:
Neil753 wrote:

...the parking space required per house is increasing all the time...

But that's the problem, this isn't sustainable. The requirement eats into the safe public space which would have previously been available for walking and playing. And still people behave as if the world owes them as much parking space as they feel they need.

This may well be true. I can think of one road where all the houses have driveways, _and_ there are parking bays painted on the pavement, and _still_ additional cars get parked on the remaining part of the pavement or doubled-up sticking out of the driveways. Its as if the number of cars each household owns increases to completely fill whatever parking space is available.

But how can the trend be reversed?

It does make me wonder about the constant cliche of 'the hard pressed motorist'. If they are so hard pressed why do they keep getting more-and-more cars?

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bikebot [1890 posts] 2 years ago
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Neil753 wrote:

so the parking space required per house is increasing all the time

It would be interesting to know if that's actually true at a national level. I'm pretty certain London has actually seen that trend reverse slightly. Private car ownership appears to be in decline amongst the young here because it's simply so expensive once you factor in insurance costs.

Most new housing in London is usually required to have fewer parking spaces than residents. My own borough seems to be fixated with installing as many sheffield stands for bikes as it possibly can, even though you would be insane to use them after dark. Anytime I see a bike left at one overnight, it's stripped of parts by the morning.

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northstar [1108 posts] 2 years ago
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More NIMBY'S it seems.

HOORAY, LET'S GAS EVERYONE ON PETROL FUMES?

zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.

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Saratoga [35 posts] 2 years ago
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"I also think it would lead to people getting rid of their front gardens to create drives."
Well we can't have people parking their cars on their own property can we...

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FluffyKittenofT... [1191 posts] 2 years ago
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Saratoga wrote:

"I also think it would lead to people getting rid of their front gardens to create drives."
Well we can't have people parking their cars on their own property can we...

I believe the problem with that is, when everyone does it, it greatly increases water run-off and so increases problems with the drains being overwhelmed, hence increasing flooding risk. Or so I have read.

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FluffyKittenofT... [1191 posts] 2 years ago
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bikebot wrote:
Neil753 wrote:

so the parking space required per house is increasing all the time

It would be interesting to know if that's actually true at a national level. I'm pretty certain London has actually seen that trend reverse slightly. Private car ownership appears to be in decline amongst the young here because it's simply so expensive once you factor in insurance costs.

Most new housing in London is usually required to have fewer parking spaces than residents. My own borough seems to be fixated with installing as many sheffield stands for bikes as it possibly can, even though you would be insane to use them after dark. Anytime I see a bike left at one overnight, it's stripped of parts by the morning.

Now I come to think of it, I have seen the figures out there somewhere on the web - I recall they show car-ownership has increased hugely in most of the country, with a particularly marked increase in multi-car households (I think if anything its even more about people with cars getting more of them than about non-car owners getting cars). But inner London is the massive exception, as there car ownership has significantly declined.

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Ush [675 posts] 2 years ago
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FluffyKittenofTindalos wrote:
pmanc wrote:
Neil753 wrote:

...the parking space required per house is increasing all the time...

But that's the problem, this isn't sustainable. The requirement eats into the safe public space which would have previously been available for walking and playing. And still people behave as if the world owes them as much parking space as they feel they need.

But how can the trend be reversed?

Tax the fuck out of private cars and invest the money in public transport. Obviously, on an individual level people are too thick to figure it out for themselves, already feel oppressed by the government and "ecologists", so you don't lose any popularity points for implementing what they already believe to be the case. They won't thank anyone for it, but they whinge about everything anyway.

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bikebot [1890 posts] 2 years ago
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FluffyKittenofTindalos wrote:

Now I come to think of it, I have seen the figures out there somewhere on the web - I recall they show car-ownership has increased hugely in most of the country, with a particularly marked increase in multi-car households (I think if anything its even more about people with cars getting more of them than about non-car owners getting cars). But inner London is the massive exception, as there car ownership has significantly declined.

That does make sense, I'll have to look into this sometime. Of course most of us are part of the problem as well when it comes to parking. Car ownership is just as higher or even higher amongst cyclists. I may not take part in the insane pastime of clogging up the centre of London with my car, but I still need to park the thing somewhere when I'm not using it (I have a private off road space, but just making a point).

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bikebot [1890 posts] 2 years ago
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FluffyKittenofTindalos wrote:

Now I come to think of it, I have seen the figures out there somewhere on the web - I recall they show car-ownership has increased hugely in most of the country, with a particularly marked increase in multi-car households (I think if anything its even more about people with cars getting more of them than about non-car owners getting cars). But inner London is the massive exception, as there car ownership has significantly declined.

That does make sense, I'll have to look into this sometime. Of course most of us are part of the problem as well when it comes to parking. Car ownership is just as higher or even higher amongst cyclists. I may not take part in the insane pastime of clogging up the centre of London with my car, but I still need to park the thing somewhere when I'm not using it (I have a private off road space, but just making a point).

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HKCambridge [219 posts] 2 years ago
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FluffyKittenofTindalos wrote:
Saratoga wrote:

"I also think it would lead to people getting rid of their front gardens to create drives."
Well we can't have people parking their cars on their own property can we...

I believe the problem with that is, when everyone does it, it greatly increases water run-off and so increases problems with the drains being overwhelmed, hence increasing flooding risk. Or so I have read.

Surely this is a solvable problem? You don't have to pave the whole garden, just two strips for the wheels. Rest can be grass, trees and bushes at the edges to soak up water.

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HKCambridge [219 posts] 2 years ago
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bikebot wrote:
FluffyKittenofTindalos wrote:

Now I come to think of it, I have seen the figures out there somewhere on the web - I recall they show car-ownership has increased hugely in most of the country, with a particularly marked increase in multi-car households (I think if anything its even more about people with cars getting more of them than about non-car owners getting cars). But inner London is the massive exception, as there car ownership has significantly declined.

That does make sense, I'll have to look into this sometime. Of course most of us are part of the problem as well when it comes to parking. Car ownership is just as higher or even higher amongst cyclists. I may not take part in the insane pastime of clogging up the centre of London with my car, but I still need to park the thing somewhere when I'm not using it (I have a private off road space, but just making a point).

And having a private off-road space should become the norm. Nothing else I might purchase would I expect to do so without somewhere to store it.

The only positive for it being cyclists who own a car is that they might be less inclined to insist it is outside the front door if they don't use it everyday.

On shared houses, I don't think that does automatically lead to multiple car household. Every shared house I've lived in has been car-free. Young people are less likely to own cars, as are those on lower incomes, and both are reasons to share housing.

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jacknorell [963 posts] 2 years ago
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Why would anyone need to pave over a whole front garden?

As mentioned above, only two strips needed of supportive material, and it can be permeable lattice blocks, which let the grass grow through. Like these (many other variants are available):

http://greenspec.buildinggreen.com/product/turfstone-paving-stones/ri-la...

Was in Duesseldorf a number of years ago, the massive parking lot outside of the convention centre used these.

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Neil753 [447 posts] 2 years ago
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The average mileage per car is falling, but the average number of cars per household is increasing, because the number of homes being built is failing to keep pace with population. If you add multiple occupancy to the trend for developers to build without parking provision if they can get away with it, plus councils' efforts to restrict parking places for new commercial developments, you can see why this problem isn't going to go away.

The crying shame is that we could create safe networks virtually overnight, not just in town but nationally too, with the use of bollards and some 20mph signs, on residential streets and carefully chosen minor roads linking communities.

If we want real change, within the cost restrictions that every local authoritiy inevitably faces, then we have to stop campaigning for a few cycleways like the one proposed in one street in Hinkley, that ultimately provide very little social cohesion, through a collective failure to look at the bigger picture. If we can do this, then there would be plenty of room for parked cars, on routes that are safe for cycling.

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brooksby [1202 posts] 2 years ago
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Quote:

It's an old-fashioned road where the elderly are looked after and everyone talks or at least nods to each other.

Except for anyone who uses a pushchair, or a wheelchair, presumably...  29

I don't really understand this - whatever other arguments are used, the locals have admitted to mass law breaking. Why doesn't the council just send down a traffic warden? I bet the fees for illegal parking would pay for any changes the council is proposing to make along there..

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FluffyKittenofT... [1191 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
HKCambridge wrote:
FluffyKittenofTindalos wrote:
Saratoga wrote:

"I also think it would lead to people getting rid of their front gardens to create drives."
Well we can't have people parking their cars on their own property can we...

I believe the problem with that is, when everyone does it, it greatly increases water run-off and so increases problems with the drains being overwhelmed, hence increasing flooding risk. Or so I have read.

Surely this is a solvable problem? You don't have to pave the whole garden, just two strips for the wheels. Rest can be grass, trees and bushes at the edges to soak up water.

Yeah, not sure what the planning laws say about this, but does seem as if it wouldn't be rocket-science for them to say you can convert your front garden as long as you leave X % of surface uncovered. Just from what I see around here though that's not how people currently do it. Also there's the issue of having to drive over the footway to get in and out.

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workhard [397 posts] 2 years ago
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Neil753 wrote:

We've all got to understand that many young adults share houses with parents, or share houses with their peers, so the parking space required per house is increasing all the time, so we shouldn't dismiss these residents' concerns.

Five adults, all working, round ours.

Only two cars between us. Only one of which is ever parked adjacent to our home. If I had my way the number of cars would be reduced to one, max.

Not only should we dismiss their concerns we should be challenging the assumption that to go without a car, and a place to park it, involves resigning one's position in the human race.

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FluffyKittenofT... [1191 posts] 2 years ago
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brooksby wrote:
Quote:

It's an old-fashioned road where the elderly are looked after and everyone talks or at least nods to each other.

Except for anyone who uses a pushchair, or a wheelchair, presumably...  29

I don't really understand this - whatever other arguments are used, the locals have admitted to mass law breaking. Why doesn't the council just send down a traffic warden? I bet the fees for illegal parking would pay for any changes the council is proposing to make along there..

Are they law-breaking? I thought parking on the pavement was only illegal in London and (I think) Bath? Anyone know for sure?

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