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Mark Cavendish 17th, Marcel Kittel crashes (but says he made up with his bike afterwards), iafter Alex Dowsett spends day on the break

Matteo Pelucchi of IAM Cycling sprung a shock on Stage 2 of Tirreno-Adriatico, winning a scrappy sprint in Cascina from FDJ.fr's Arnaud Demare, with Lotto Belisol's André Greipel third. Mark Cavendish of Omega Pharma-Quick Step couldn't find a way through the traffic and finished 17th, but keeps the overall lead. The other rider expected to challenge him and Greipel for the win, Marcel Kittel, crashed with 2.5km left.

Kittel, who last year became the first man to beat Cavendish in the Tour de France finale on the Champs-Elysées, showed his disgust by tossing his bike to the ground, shown in the following video.

Afterwards, Kittel (perhaps with a bit of nudging from the team's PR) tweeted "I'm VERY sorry for throwing my beloved Giant Propel on the ground. I still love it! We're just having an intense relationship. #deepemotions"

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Demare seemed to have the better of his rivals in the sprint, but the 25-year-old Pelucchi timed his sprint perfectly to come past the Frenchman and secure the Swiss UCI Professional Continental team's maiden victory in a WorldTour race.

Behind third-placed Greipel in fourth spot was NetApp-Endura's 23-year-old Irish rider, Sam Bennett.

Some 30km ahead of the frantic finale to the 166km stage from San Vicenzo, Movistar's Alex Dowsett had launched a lone attack from the break he had spent the day in, the British time trial champion seeking to put his talents in that discipline to pull off what would have been a spectacular solo win.

But passing under the 10km to go banner, his lead, which stood at around 2 minutes with 20km left, had been slashed to just 10 seconds and the Essex-born rider was swept up with some 7 kilometres left to ride.

Born in Scotland, Simon moved to London aged seven and now lives in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds with his miniature schnauzer, Elodie. He fell in love with cycling one Saturday morning in 1994 while living in Italy when Milan-San Remo went past his front door. A daily cycle commuter in London back before riding to work started to boom, he's been news editor at road.cc since 2009. Handily for work, he speaks French and Italian. He doesn't get to ride his Colnago as often as he'd like, and freely admits he's much more adept at cooking than fettling with bikes.

4 comments

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leqin [163 posts] 2 years ago
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I see he isn't as good at parking as Brad

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SideBurn [890 posts] 2 years ago
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I was discussing the 'what do you do first after crashing' last night; check yourself or the bike? Maybe the way to tell the difference between the amateurs and pros is that that the pros throw bike and/or have a tantrum?
My son came off his bike and broke his wrist last year with a camera on his bike (downhill, MTB). It always gets a laugh that he checks that his wheels are not buckled before doing anything else!

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Al__S [998 posts] 2 years ago
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I do wonder if that bike was rideable either before or after the flounce?

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nicholassmith [92 posts] 2 years ago
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Al__S wrote:

I do wonder if that bike was rideable either before or after the flounce?

Apparently the right side of the handlebars broke which is what caused it, so might not have been too rideable. Quite surprised the bars broke, I'd have thought for someone like Kittel they'd have gone for strength over lightness.