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British Cycling policy advisor says it's time to stop distracting helmet arguments and concentrate on real safety issues...

British Cycling policy advisor Chris Boardman says it’s time for the cycling community to put the debate about mandatory cycle helmets to bed and get across the message that helmet use is one of the least important cycling safety measures.

Even talking about making helmets mandatory “massively puts people off” cycling, Boardman said, and likened the culture of helmet use among keen cyclists to people wearing body armour because they have got used to being shot at.

Talking to road.cc at the London Bike Show, Boardman said, “I think the helmet issue is a massive red herring. It’s not even in the top 10 of things you need to do to keep cycling safe or more widely, save the most lives.”

You’re being shot at, put on body armour

Boardman returned to an analogy he has made before, and which even he admits is a bit melodramatic, though it gets the point across

“It’s a bit like saying ‘people are sniping at you going down this street, so put some body armour on,’” he said.

Government encouragement to wear helmets was therefore “a big campaign to get people to wear body armour, by the people who should be stopping the shooting.”

Widespread use of helmets, he said, sends the wrong message.

“Once you see somebody wearing body armour, even if there’s no shooting, you think ‘Christ I’m not going down there if they’re wearing body armour to go down that street.’ It scares people off.”

There’s a better solution to the problem of cycle safety, Boardman said. In the Netherlands, just 0.8 percent of cyclists wear helmets yet the Dutch have the lowest rate of cycling head injury, thanks to segregated cycling infrastructure. Thirty percent of journeys in the Netherlands are made by bike, he said, and 50 percent of children’s journey to school.

”The best way to deal with [the head injury issue] is what the Dutch have done,” he said. “Where you have the Highest rate of helmet use, you also have the highest rate of head injury: us and the US.”

Yet there’s also an almost-fanatical, knee-jerk devotion to helmet use among enthusiast and sporting cyclists.

Boardman said: “People who are wearing body armour get used to being shot at, when it’s the getting shot at that’s the problem.”

A distraction

Talking about helmets had become a time-consuming distraction, he said. “We’ve got to tackle the helmet debate head on because it’s so annoying,” he said. “It gets a disproportionate amount of coverage. When you have three minutes and someone asks ‘Do you wear a helmet’ you know the vast majority of your time when you could be talking about stuff that will make a difference, is gone.”

He said the focus on helmets had made cycling seem more dangerous than it really is.

“We’ve gone away from the facts,” he said. “We’ve gone to anecdotes. It’s like shark attacks - more people are killed building sandcastles than are killed by sharks. It’s just ludicrous that the facts aren’t matching up with the actions because the press focus, naturally, on the news stories, and [the notion that cycling is dangerous] becomes the norm, and it isn’t the norm.

“You can ride a thousand times round the planet for each cycling death. You are safer than gardening.”

Cycling’s image

Like many cycling advocates, Boardman wants to see cycling presented as a normal, everyday activity.

“I saw two people riding down the hill to my village. One person coming down the hill to go for the train in high-viz, helmet on.

“A few moments later another guy came down, in shirt sleeves, with a leather bag on his back, just riding his bike to the station.

“Which one of those makes me want to [ride]?”

Our official grumpy Northerner, John has been riding bikes for over 30 years since discovering as an uncoordinated teen that a sport could be fun if it didn't require you to catch a ball or get in the way of a hulking prop forward.

Road touring was followed by mountain biking and a career racing in the mud that was as brief as it was unsuccessful.

Somewhere along the line came the discovery that he could string a few words together, followed by the even more remarkable discovery that people were mug enough to pay for this rather than expecting him to do an honest day's work. He's pretty certain he's worked for even more bike publications than Mat Brett.

The inevitable 30-something MAMIL transition saw him shift to skinny tyres and these days he lives in Cambridge where the lack of hills is more than made up for by the headwinds.

198 comments

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AllanMui [3 posts] 3 years ago
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Mr Boardman may be correct if we all live in the Netherlands. But until UK cities have all the recommended safety measures in place, perhaps helmets should be considered a higher priority; despite their limited effectiveness.

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xcstu [113 posts] 3 years ago
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Boardman your an idiot!

You can argue all you like but helmets regardless of their minimum protection might be the difference that saves a life!

I also ride offroad were I don't have to worry about drivers attitudes, drivers education, drivers awareness, safer road layouts etc... If I get it wrong it's my mistake ( no one else's) and whatever precautions I take can only help but to rule out as not important due to fashion and putting people of cycling is crazy!

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felixcat [486 posts] 3 years ago
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Big Mick, it seems that you were given very poor advice by your legal adviser.

"CTC members have forced a multi-national insurer to take full responsibility for a crash in which a cyclist was hit by a car.

NIG (the National Insurance and Guarantee Corporation) has withdrawn its contributory negligence claim against Walsall cyclist Alan Millett, brought about because Millett was not wearing a helmet when the collision took place.

The insurer admitted liability for the crash but reduced its damages offer by 15 per cent. Now, the pressure cyclists brought to bear has forced NIG to pay the full offer of £130,000 with no deduction.

Millett, 66, suffered serious head injuries, a broken collar bone and severe bruising when he was hit by the car as he cycled around a roundabout on the A41 in Walsall. An appeal for action from CTC prompted members to send hundreds of angry emails and letters to NIG calling for payment of the full award.

Outraged cyclists also forced Provident Insurance to retract a similar claim against young Darren Coombs last year.

Millett's Solicitor Joseph Rahm said: "This is another significant victory for cyclists. The considerable discontent CTC members showed led NIG to back down very quickly. When it comes to protective head gear, insurers know they are on a poor wicket and that there is no proof that the head injury would have been lessened by the wearing of a helmet."

http://www.cyclehelmets.org/1053.html

You will also find on this site a legal opinion from Martin Porter QC, "the cycling silk."

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felixcat [486 posts] 3 years ago
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Big Mick, here is another case. I think that you may have a case for negligence by your solicitor.

"This is a copy of a press release issued when a cyclist from Liverpool, England won his claim for full damages despite a counter-claim that he was negligent for not wearing a cycle helmet. The defendant's insurers abandoned its counter-claim immediately before the trial, but it is interesting to note that the judge subsequently remarked that "it was not surprising that those allegations should be abandoned", suggesting that had that not been the case, the judge may well have ruled in the cyclist's favour.

"In personal injury cases where the victim is a cyclist, the question of whether a protective helmet was worn at the time of the accident often becomes a critical issue when considering liability. In one recent case Bill Braithwaite QC stood firm in pursuing a claim for a brain-injured cyclist, despite pressure ,to accept liability on behalf of his client. The outcome was that the claimant will recover 100% of his damages, despite a detailed report from the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, submitted by the defendant.

http://www.cyclehelmets.org/1049.html

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felixcat [486 posts] 3 years ago
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This is the opinion of Brian Walker, one of the leading experts on the mechanics of helmets, and whose company Head Protection Evaluations is the principal UK test laboratory for helmets and head protection systems of all kinds

If you think Boardman is an idiot take a look at this.

http://www.cyclehelmets.org/1081.html

"I have read so many opinions over the past few years on this subject, which in the main have been technically adrift of reality or based on misinformation. I felt that it was time to respond.

"In other legal cases with which I have been involved, where a cyclist has been in collision with a motorised vehicle, the impact energy potentials generated were of a level which outstripped those we use to certify Grand Prix drivers helmets. In some accidents at even moderate motor vehicle speeds, energy potential levels in hundreds of joules were present.

"Referring back to the Court case mentioned early, the very eminent QC under whose instruction I was privileged to work, tried repeatedly to persuade the equally eminent neurosurgeons acting for either side, and the technical expert, to state that one must be safer wearing a helmet than without. All three refused to so do, stating that they had seen severe brain damage and fatal injury both with and without cycle helmets being worn. In their view, the performance of cycle helmets is much too complex a subject for such a sweeping claim to be made.

These opinions are given by experts whose professional reputations depend on their statements being justifiable. Hence their reluctance to make claims for cycle helmets being as efficacious as many of the cyclists posting above assume to be obvious.

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utility_cyclist [16 posts] 3 years ago
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Halle-bloody-lulia. At last someone in a position of influence says something sensible about cycle helmets. The whole debate tends, to put it politely, to put the cart before the horse. Helmets do nothing to prevent you having a collision. By all means wear one if you want to, but the emphasis should be on preventing collisions through driver education, cyclist training, and infrastructure design. Chris Boardman has gone up quite a few notches in my estimation. Even if he does have a commercial relationship with a well-known high street cycle retailer  3

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thehairs1970 [42 posts] 3 years ago
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I find CB's comments unhelpful. Being put off cycling because of helmets is like being put off driving because of seat belts. Silly. I wear a helmet in case I fall off not in case someone hits me. I've had three bad falls. One resulted in a helmet split front to back. Better that than my head. Another caused a front somersault and broken collarbone. The most recent, a split chin, chipped tooth and bruises. My brother in law is 2 years into recovery after a majorr cycling injury but he's alive. I don't think helmets should be compulsory but you won't find me or my cycling friends out without one.

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mrmo [2094 posts] 3 years ago
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thehairs1970 wrote:

I find CB's comments unhelpful. Being put off cycling because of helmets is like being put off driving because of seat belts. Silly. I wear a helmet in case I fall off not in case someone hits me. I've had three bad falls. One resulted in a helmet split front to back. Better that than my head. Another caused a front somersault and broken collarbone. The most recent, a split chin, chipped tooth and bruises. My brother in law is 2 years into recovery after a majorr cycling injury but he's alive. I don't think helmets should be compulsory but you won't find me or my cycling friends out without one.

would you wear a helmet to walk to the shop. This is not about sport cycling, it is about utility cycling. For which helmets are not really an issue, certainly not as important as the space devoted to discussing them.

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mrmo [2094 posts] 3 years ago
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xcstu wrote:

Boardman your an idiot!

You can argue all you like but helmets regardless of their minimum protection might be the difference that saves a life!

I also ride offroad were I don't have to worry about drivers attitudes, drivers education, drivers awareness, safer road layouts etc... If I get it wrong it's my mistake ( no one else's) and whatever precautions I take can only help but to rule out as not important due to fashion and putting people of cycling is crazy!

would you ride off road without a helmet? I wouldn't, risk compensation at work.

Helmets are pretty much only good at deflecting branches, oh and giving you whiplash when your helmet light gets caught by a branch you didn't see!

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felixcat [486 posts] 3 years ago
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thehairs1970 wrote:

Being put off cycling because of helmets is like being put off driving because of seat belts. .

Whatever you think, every compulsion law has been followed by a drop in cycling.

"Edmonton – 59% reduction in children’s cycling by 2004

Cyclists were counted in Edmonton (a city in Alberta), in 2000 (pre-law) and 2004 (post-law). The percentage of cyclists under 18 fell from 26% in the pre-law survey, to 15% post-law (Hagel et al, 2006), suggesting that the law discouraged substantial numbers of youngsters from cycling. Compared to adults who were not required to wear helmets, children’s cycling (<13 years) fell by 59%, with a 41% reduction for teenagers aged 13-17 (Hagel et al, 2006).

At the time, great concerns were also expressed that injuries per cyclist had increased after the introduction of Alberta’s helmet law (BHRF, 1055).

http://www.cyclehelmets.org/1250.html

"Only two states - Victoria and NSW - attempted to measure the effect of the laws on cycling activity by pre- and post-law surveys at the same sites, observation periods, time of year and, where possible, the same observers. In NSW, data from identical pre- and post-law surveys were available only for children. Both surveys were conducted in excellent weather. Table 1 shows that the increase in numbers wearing helmets was only about half the decrease in cyclists counted, with similar outcomes for cycling in recreational areas, through road intersections, or to school. Reductions in rural NSW (35%) and in the Sydney Metropolitan area (37%) were almost identical. Another survey was carried out a year later, under fine and generally sunny conditions. Even fewer cyclists were counted.

http://www.cyclehelmets.org/1242.html

"February 2012: The New Zealand Medical Journal published Evaluation of New Zealand's bicycle helmet law (PDF 209kb) by former British Cycling Federation coach and road safety instructor Colin F Clarke, showing a massive plunge in cycling levels and a 20% higher accident rate since helmet law enforcement.

Public on-road cycling participation in New Zealand fell by 26% between 1989 and 1998, according to the Land Transport Safety Authority Cyclist Travel Survey (PDF 108kb page 42). New Zealand's population increased by 406,390 - or 11% - during that time. In the five years prior to 1994, average annual cyclist injury totals were 991. In the five years after 1994, average annual injury totals were 707 - a reduction of 29%.

http://www.cyclehelmets.org/1022.html

It seems likely to me that helmet promotion necessarly entails
claiming that cycling is exceptionally dangerous. Perhaps you remember BHit, the British pro helmet charity promoting helmets to schoolchildren with an X-ray of a skull.

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fret [37 posts] 3 years ago
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Why are people so anti helmet? I'm not talking about making them mandatory, that's daft and unenforceable. Helmets are there to absorb the initial impact even if they may not prevent extreme damage in some cases.
I know of one person who hit their head on the kerb, the helmet cracked, their head was OK.
Last week in the Olympics a female snowboarder went down heavy which resulted in a split helmet, she was OK.
So what? I hear people say.
I'll just throw this in. In 1977 when the only helmets were those leather things that did nothing I had the misfortune to have my chain come off which resulted in a nasty kerb to bike interface.
I lost control as I was going full chat standing up accelerating so had little chance to stop. The last thing I remember is "Oh, shit, I'm going to get my hands dirty putting the chain back on"
I hit a concrete bus stop sign with by head and shoulder. I fractured my skull, ripped my ear off and broke my collarbone. I lost a pint of blood, 30 stitches and was in and out of consciousness for a couple of days. I cannot hear properly out of my ear either.
Had I been wearing a modern helmet I don't think the first two injuries would have occurred.

That's my two-pennorth, go ahead and mock me and tell me of all the people who have come off and never had a head injury and tell me why the construction is similar to motorcycle helmets, which as we all know are useless too.
I will happily show you my scars and ignore you with my deaf ear.

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eschelar [56 posts] 3 years ago
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The helmet was never designed to prevent accidents. It is designed to mitigate damage if one occurs.

It's like saying - better than giving body armor to the troops and cops, let's just tell them to just not get shot. Then they won't get shot and all that stupid heavy, expensive body armor is no longer necessary.

Everybody wins!

No, the reality is that of all the parts of your body that can get hurt, the head is the most likely to make an injury into a 'serious injury'. If you get a body part hit with enough force to break bone, but it hits you in the leg, you're probably going to be a lot better off than if that same impact hit your head.

Hence the helmet is actually a useful item.

That wasn't complicated now was it?

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ColT [343 posts] 3 years ago
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Dear Road.cc. As people don't seem to get this, please do an article headed up something like:

'Helmets are not even in the top 10 of the most important things that improve cycling safety'

then maybe, just maybe, people might understand the thrust of what CB is saying.

Oh, hang on...  102

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Joeinpoole [444 posts] 3 years ago
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fret wrote:

Why are people so anti helmet? I'm not talking about making them mandatory, that's daft and unenforceable. Helmets are there to absorb the initial impact even if they may not prevent extreme damage in some cases.
I know of one person who hit their head on the kerb, the helmet cracked, their head was OK.
Last week in the Olympics a female snowboarder went down heavy which resulted in a split helmet, she was OK.
So what? I hear people say.
I'll just throw this in. In 1977 when the only helmets were those leather things that did nothing I had the misfortune to have my chain come off which resulted in a nasty kerb to bike interface.
I lost control as I was going full chat standing up accelerating so had little chance to stop. The last thing I remember is "Oh, shit, I'm going to get my hands dirty putting the chain back on"
I hit a concrete bus stop sign with by head and shoulder. I fractured my skull, ripped my ear off and broke my collarbone. I lost a pint of blood, 30 stitches and was in and out of consciousness for a couple of days. I cannot hear properly out of my ear either.
Had I been wearing a modern helmet I don't think the first two injuries would have occurred.

That's my two-pennorth, go ahead and mock me and tell me of all the people who have come off and never had a head injury and tell me why the construction is similar to motorcycle helmets, which as we all know are useless too.
I will happily show you my scars and ignore you with my deaf ear.

I think you're missing the point. There exists a truly *massive* misconception that cycling is a 'more dangerous activity' than other perfectly 'normal' activities like having a drink, walking down some stairs, being a pedestrian or driving a car.

Statistics prove that that simply isn't the case.

Fine if you *want* to wear head-protection when cycling ... but, if your objective is to be as safe as possible, then you really *should* wear your helmet when drinking, driving or descending stairs. All of those activities are, statistically speaking, far more likely to result in a head injury than cycling.

I think you'd look a bit of a dork wearing a helmet as PPE whilst having a pint in your local ... but that *is* the activity that is most likely (by a fucking country-mile) to result in a serious head injury.

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levermonkey [682 posts] 3 years ago
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levermonkey wrote:

The Golden Rule Here is 'Whatever's Comfortable'.

If you feel safer wearing a helmet - wear a helmet.
If you feel safer wearing hi-vis - wear hi-vis.

It's YOUR choice. Although wearing a helmet does save you from having to nail your helmet cam to your head.  24

I know it's bad form to quote yourself. But...

It is not a matter of being anti-helmet BUT of being pro-choice.

When I'm off road on a MTB then I wear a helmet. When I'm commuting I don't. When I'm riding for fun I don't. When I'm riding in a sportive or similar I do, because the organisers ask me to (I still have the choice; I can choose whether I enter or not).

I'm over 21 (Ok! With interest, VAT and then some  3 ), I don't need my mothers permission. The information is out there, read it and come to your own decision!

Having said all that I do think children under 10 should wear a helmet. Please note I said should NOT must. I won't think any less of you as a parent if you decide your child doesn't need a helmet.

Remember cyclists are goats not sheep.  4

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Highland Peat [4 posts] 3 years ago
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Hooray!! I completely agree with Mr Boardman - I ride MTB and Road and will evaluate my ride as to what protection I wear, (not just the panacea that is the magic helmet but also pads and type of clothing) but what I find interesting is that when I ride Road in me cap/beanie, some other cyclists start preaching about my irresponsibility of not wearing a helmet, but strangely enough one thing that all these guys have in common is that they all seem to crash a lot - why is that do you think?

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BigglesMeister [65 posts] 3 years ago
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It's not a fall from your bike that's going to kill you, that's more likely to happen if you're hit by a motor vehicle and motor vehicles pass helmeted cyclist more closely than bare headed cyclists.

http://www.bath.ac.uk/news/articles/archive/overtaking110906.html

https://www.eta.co.uk/2011/04/01/safest-bicycle-helmet-has-built-in-wig/

Not so long ago, popular opinion was that the earth was flat.

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unclebadger [74 posts] 3 years ago
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Don't miss the point: Boardman is not saying "Don't wear a helmet" he is saying that the government making helmets compulsory distracts from the real issue which is that the road system is feckin dangerous.

Anyone who has ever crashed and hit their head will attest to the fact that a helmet can save your life. Obviously its great to feel the wind in your hair but I'd rather have a helmet in between. In the last crash I had, when I came round my helmet had actually cracked in half. I'd rather that than my skull.

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ronin [279 posts] 3 years ago
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There are many things in life people try to focus on when they don't want to solve a problem. It's like debating the children that throw stones at tanks in Palestine, but not wanting to debate why the tanks are there in the first place.

Cycling is not considered as a serious form of transport. It's more an inconvenience to cars, and that's why many drivers act accordingly.

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giff77 [1275 posts] 3 years ago
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It never ceases to amaze me how many of the helmet advocates manage to keep falling off their bikes! It's easy; learn not to fall and if you are to fall learn how to fall!! Don't overcook descending or corners. Don't cycle through standing water as you don't know if there's a crater under there. In the last 5 years I have accumulated well over 40,000 miles and have had two offs. Once when a ped stepped out in front of me and I twisted my shoulder as a result and the other at a set of lights when I didn't un clip in time.

Boardman is correct in what he says. Note, he is not anti helmet. He is only saying that the helmet is not at the top of the agenda. And yet we have a torrent of anecdotes of helmets saving peoples lives. The wearing of a helmet will not make cycling on the UK roads any safer. As will the wearing of HI Viz. Many motorists out there treat vulnerable road users with total and utter contempt.

The only way of making the roads safer to use is more indepth driving tuition and difficult, better infrastructure for cyclists, better sentencing for driving offenses.

There is so much more that can be done rather the vague slap a bit of plastic on your head and everything will be all right.

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Condor flyer [50 posts] 3 years ago
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Chris Boardman is right, talk of cycle helmets has stymied the campaign to improve road conditions for cyclists.
There are only two irrefutable facts we should be concerned about concerning the wearing of helmets.
They are: 1. Their introduction changed for ever the long held and correct perception that cycling was/is a low risk activity into one that is now considered, incorrectly, to be dangerous.
2. Cycle helmet wearing has done nothing to improve
road safety for cyclists.
As an example of how twisted the safety debate has become,
I recall hearing one nutter of an MP - at a hearing of the House of Commons Select Committee on Transport some years ago - come out with the following line: he said, "...if cyclists were made to wear helmets surely there would be no need to slow traffic."

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felixcat [486 posts] 3 years ago
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unclebadger wrote:

Anyone who has ever crashed and hit their head will attest to the fact that a helmet can save your life. .

The only time I have hit my head I was lucky enough to be wearing a Festina cap.
I was hardly bruised. I urge all riders to wear a cotton cap, though I'm not sure the Festina design was important.

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felixcat [486 posts] 3 years ago
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[quote=Condor flyer
I recall hearing one nutter of an MP - at a hearing of the House of Commons Select Committee on Transport some years ago - come out with the following line: he said, "...if cyclists were made to wear helmets surely there would be no need to slow traffic."[/quote]

Dead right. I suspect that is why so many non cyclists are prominent in the campaign to make us wear foam. Fatties Angie Lee and Eric Martlew are good examples.

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crazy-legs [909 posts] 3 years ago
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Once again, the point has been wildly missed by everyone trotting out the same old anecdotes of how they "know" their helmet saved them.
Bear in mind you're talking about different types of riding - we're trying to get more people on bikes for normal everyday things - going to the shops, commuting etc - and portraying that as some kind of reckless, dangerous activity that requires lycra, helmets, hi-vis and an ability to mix it with buses and trucks doing 30+mph doesn't help. Yes, if I'm riding like that I wear a helmet. Getting a hire bike to potter round London, I'd never consider it - it's a normal everyday activity of me going to the shops in normal clothes and a completely different way of riding. I suspect some people on here (who are by definition keen road cyclists with racing bikes and all the kit) have forgotten this whole other world of cycling which exists outside of it being a hobby/sport for the relatively well-off rather than a valid mode of transport for all.

You remember after that 2-week period in London where 6 cyclists were killed? Rather than it being taken as an opportunity to really push the #space4cycling campaign and The Times' "Cities Fit for Cycling" campaign it became an angry argument with the three H's brought to the fore - Helmets, Hi vis and Headphones. The road safety campaign that followed involved the Police standing there pulling cyclists for not wearing hi-vis while largely ignoring the massive elephant in the room of all the big dangerous badly driven cars & lorries. Basically moved everything onto victim blaming, arguments and diverted the attention of the media away from the main issue.  2

As CB so rightly says - stop talking about helmets and move the whole debate forwards.

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felixcat [486 posts] 3 years ago
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From an article in the New York Times.

"A Bicycling Mystery"

"Millions of parents take it as an article of faith that putting a bicycle helmet on their children, or themselves, will help keep them out of harm's way.

"But new data on bicycle accidents raises questions about that. The number of head injuries has increased 10 percent since 1991, even as bicycle helmet use has risen sharply, according to figures compiled by the Consumer Product Safety Commission. But given that ridership has declined over the same period, the rate of head injuries per active cyclist has increased 51 percent just as bicycle helmets have become widespread.

"Still, with fewer people riding bicycles, experts are mystified as to why injuries are on the rise. ''It's puzzling to me that we can't find the benefit of bike helmets here,'' said Ronald L. Medford, the assistant executive director of the safety commission's hazard identification office.

More interesting stuff in the article.

http://www.nytimes.com/2001/07/29/business/a-bicycling-mystery-head-inju...

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ironmancole [350 posts] 3 years ago
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Number 1 in my book has to be -

You can permanently lose your licence if you prove yourself to be unfit, rather than this obsession with keeping everyone in a car at all cost, especially when that cost is continually payed by innocents.

Until that becomes a reality I know I can go out right now and 'accidentally' kill and be back behind the wheel within two years tops.

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Kadenz [100 posts] 3 years ago
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I agree with levermonkey. Wear a helmet & hi-viz if you want to; don't if you don't.

Personally, I wear both. I'd be very reluctant to cycle without a helmet: you never know in advance when you'll need it.

I certainly didn't find my helmet a 'distraction' when I fell heavily going round a corner on my bike and hit my head on the edge of the kerbstone. I got a big dent in my helmet, not in my skull.

Nor was it a 'distraction' when another cyclist came out of a side road just as I was passing at 18mph, causing me to somersault over my handlebars and hit the back of my head on the Tarmac as I landed. The helmet took the force of the blow, not my head.

Personally, I was very glad to have been wearing a helmet on both occasions. But if other cyclists would prefer their unprotected head to take the full force in such full force of the blow, at's up to them.

I certainly agree, though, that the bigger issue is careless, reckless and cycle-hating drivers.

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nitram [2 posts] 3 years ago
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He is plain wrong, would you drive a new car without airbags - no, I just a month ago would have died from a serious head injury if it were not for my helmet. Helmets are a not brainer.. excuse the pun. Martin McGrevy

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GrahamH [21 posts] 3 years ago
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would you drive a new car without airbags

But How carefully would you drive that car if that air bag was replaced by a big spike?

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ColT [343 posts] 3 years ago
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nitram wrote:

He is plain wrong, would you drive a new car without airbags - no, I just a month ago would have died from a serious head injury if it were not for my helmet. Helmets are a not brainer.. excuse the pun. Martin McGrevy

Jesus H Christ. How difficult is it to understand?

CB is not saying 'do not wear a helmet'. Have you read and understood the article? Have you read and understood the other comments, particularly those pertaining to assertions that 'my helmet saved my life'?

May I respectfully suggest that you have a(nother) look and come back with details of those bits you don't understand?

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