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Sabbath reveal September Disc prototype titanium frame

Titanium specialists Sabbath Bicycles are set to launch the September Disc, a disc-equipped version of their touring and Audax bike.

 

It’s still early stages in the development of this new model, but they have released these photos of the first prototype. Sabbath are not giving away much detail at the moment, but road.cc will exclusively be following the development of this new bike, and we’ll be the first to get our hands on a rideable model in due course.

Disc brakes on a bike like the September make a lot of sense. Much like the Genesis Equilibrium Disc and Charge Plug 5, both disc-equipped models, this is a bike not for racing but for everything else. From riding to the office, training in the winter, touring in the summer, weekend jaunts to the coffee shop, it’s a bike that you should be able to ride happily year-round through all weathers.

And it’s that last bit that makes disc brakes such an appealing performance benefit. Discs offer more consistent braking performance in adverse weather conditions, with much less degradation when the rims are covered in rain and mud. It does seem that riders of such bikes are open-minded enough to consider disc brakes over calipers.

The guys at Sabbath feel the braking performance for the sort of riding the September is used for makes it perfect for disc brakes.  

“From all our customer interactions we know that our September model is used a lot for commuting and light touring as well as long days in the saddle,” says the company. “In often variable UK weather and poor road conditions, disc brakes on the September start to make a lot of sense.”

We don't know much more about the frame at this stage, other than it's clearly a very well finished development frame. The proto has external cable and hose routing, and the rear caliper is mounted inside the chainstays with quite a nice looking dropout incorporating the post mount. Stay tuned, we'll keep you updated on this new frame when we know more.

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

6 comments

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velovoice [23 posts] 2 years ago
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Looks like they're following Enigma's lead. In fact, those look like the same Paragon dropouts as on my Etape.

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Gasman Jim [156 posts] 2 years ago
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And they're all following Lynskey's lead. I've been riding a Sportive Disc since September and it's great.

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kcr [107 posts] 2 years ago
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Another frame with the rear disc mount on the chainstay. This seems to be the fashion at the moment, but it creates a u-trap in the cable run, so any water and crap that gets inside the cable outer will collect at the low point. The cable exit point is also nicely angled to catch spray coming off the disc and wheel. It just seems to negate one of the advantages of running full length cable outer to the rear brake - longer cable life and less maintenance.
The argument seems to be that it makes it easier to mount racks and guards, but I haven't found this to be a problem with the conventional seat stay mounting position.

I was warned off this design when replacing my disc equipped frame after reading an account from somone whose brake cable had frozen up in winter.

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dave atkinson [6223 posts] 2 years ago
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kcr wrote:

Another frame with the rear disc mount on the chainstay. This seems to be the fashion at the moment, but it creates a u-trap in the cable run, so any water and crap that gets inside the cable outer will collect at the low point. The cable exit point is also nicely angled to catch spray coming off the disc and wheel. It just seems to negate one of the advantages of running full length cable outer to the rear brake - longer cable life and less maintenance.
The argument seems to be that it makes it easier to mount racks and guards, but I haven't found this to be a problem with the conventional seat stay mounting position.

I was warned off this design when replacing my disc equipped frame after reading an account from somone whose brake cable had frozen up in winter.

I know people who have stuck one of those rubber V-brake noodles in the gap to stop water getting in

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fukawitribe [1748 posts] 2 years ago
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kcr wrote:

The argument seems to be that it makes it easier to mount racks and guards, but I haven't found this to be a problem with the conventional seat stay mounting position.

Some of the consideration on a rigid back end is that is allows a little more scope in lay-up / tube geometry to build compliance in to the seat-stays - they still take some but a lot is taken by the chain-stay.

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kcr [107 posts] 2 years ago
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Quote:

I know people who have stuck one of those rubber V-brake noodles in the gap to stop water getting in

Yes, Gore provide rubber seals like that with some of their cables, and BB7s come with something similar for the cable exit point. I find they always split or get loose eventually, and they never provide a truly watertight seal. You can't beat running the cable downhill to the seatstay, because gravity simply keeps the water out. For my commuting bike I want to minimise my maintenance, and I found that switching to full length outers for the rear cable made a big difference. The shifting just keeps working through all the winter crud. This design just seems a bit of a backward step from that perspective.