Arthritis in the knee

by Adey   November 22, 2013  

Hi all - just been diagnosed with possible arthritis in the rh knee Sad wondering if anyone else out there suffers with the same problem and what they/you do to help ease the pain (mine is constant but bearable)
I'm currently taking Glucosemine/Chondrotin and barrow loads of Ibrophen

cheers

18 user comments

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I suffer from the same - arthritis of the RH knee - and find that cycling, and Paracetamol (occasionally - as and when) helps a lot - so far.

A word of warning though - taking Ibuprofen 'by the barrow load' - and particularly long term - raises Blood Pressure 'significantly'.

If they're prescribed by a doctor, though, I presume he'll monitor your BP regularly.

Mike

posted by mikeh126 [2 posts]
22nd November 2013 - 18:55

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thanks mike - yeah, im well aware of the ibuprofen issue Wink ... but they seem to be more effective than cocodamel etc . Also tried the 'volterol,,' route but i could clear a tube a week!!

posted by Adey [97 posts]
22nd November 2013 - 19:15

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Try Devils claw. I think it works for me.
Many people will advise twiddling rather than pushing a big gear. worth a try but I find that worse as my knee moves more times and with less controlled/restrained pressure. I don't go silly high but do keep a low cadence where possible. I also found that my full suspension bike made things worse. It boiled down to my seat being further behind the BB and I was scooping the pedals more. the road bike is much better and moving the seat forward helped to a small extent.

posted by mattsccm [218 posts]
23rd November 2013 - 9:18

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Interesting comment about the fs.
My year of groin pain, traced to hip problem, really started showing up after riding full sus. It just seemed to spark things off.
Not the cause, but rather than help it hindered.

I've also cut back the ibuprofen, as I found I was gettingbursts of palpitations when relaxed (ie. Watching tv, sitting reading, etc)

posted by Super Domestique [1506 posts]
23rd November 2013 - 12:11

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cheers matt - just bought the 'devil's claw' gel Devil will give it a go!!
yeah - i realise ive got to cut-back with the 'profens'!!

posted by Adey [97 posts]
23rd November 2013 - 20:43

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I have arthritis in my left knee and have been told I will need a replacement in 2-5 years. When I asked the consultant about cycling he said so long as it was not excessive. I asked 60-80 miles? That's excessive he said!
Well I had a considered think and as cycling is the only time the knee does not give me pain at all I decided to carry on.
I have just started Glucausamine sulphate so don't know if that works yet. Ibuprofen does not touch the pain for me and it is painful 24/7 the worst at night or walking. I am hoping my Dr can suggest some good pain killers that don't have the aforementioned problems that might go with Ibuprofen.
Look on the Arthritis UK web site they have some good articles and seem to agree that excercise can be beneficial.
The trouble is your arthritis and mine might be completely different re pain, cause, outcome so it is a very personal issue.
Good luck!
Just as an aside I ride at 90-100 rpm normally and often go up to 110-120 on the turbo trainer without a problem

NigelSign's picture

posted by NigelSign [9 posts]
24th November 2013 - 8:11

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60-80 miles is not excessive.

posted by northstar [936 posts]
24th November 2013 - 12:56

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I have suffered with an arthritic hip for possibly last 30 years (now 56 years old) I have ridden to some extent during most of that time and am now increasing my mileage. I have taken Glucosamine since it was first mooted and feel sure it has enabled me to go this far. I seldom take Ibuprofen due to it's adverse stomach effects. Try ice packing the knee after a ride and take Turmeric daily (available as a tablet) for it's anti-inflammatory effects. High cadence should help due to lower stress through the joint. Do not take a doctors advice as a matter of course, after all they hand out statns because they are paid a bonus to do so even though they are effective in only a small number of cases. Lastly, the more I ride, the less my hip pains me! Surrounding muscle becomes stronger and supports the joint. Keep riding!

posted by peterben [22 posts]
24th November 2013 - 18:41

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thankyou Nigel and Peter for your input, really is appreciated - also taking Glucosamine/Chontrotin complex which does seem to help - so frustrating because i felt that this year could have been my best year 'on the bike' (bearing in mind im 53) i realise there is no 'miracle cure' its just finding the 'balance' - i certainly dont want to give up cycling

posted by Adey [97 posts]
24th November 2013 - 19:02

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I'm pretty determined to hold fire on a new hip (for now) so will also give glucosamine a try.

posted by Super Domestique [1506 posts]
24th November 2013 - 19:37

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know how you feel Mr Domestique!! why should us 'elder' folks give up on something we love? Arrrrrghhh - so frustrating Crying

posted by Adey [97 posts]
24th November 2013 - 20:28

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I am riding more than ever and have applied for the Pru Ride London next year, hopefully for Arthritis research. Will be my first 100

posted by peterben [22 posts]
24th November 2013 - 20:40

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Adey wrote:
know how you feel Mr Domestique!! why should us 'elder' folks give up on something we love? Arrrrrghhh - so frustrating Crying

I just don't feel that old, despite what my kids tell me Smile (just turned 40)

posted by Super Domestique [1506 posts]
24th November 2013 - 20:44

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posted by Super Domestique [1506 posts]
24th November 2013 - 20:49

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thanks for the feedback/advice fellas - just so frustrating when you want to ride but your body is saying 'feck off' At Wits End

posted by Adey [97 posts]
24th November 2013 - 22:40

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I commented in the other hip thread that Super D mentions. I had both hips replaced in the last 12 months. When my natural hips were at their worst I would only get relief when riding my bike, but the payback got dramatically worse in the final few months. Within an hour of getting off the bike I would be hobbling around. It was a year ago today for my right hip and 10 months for my left and I wish I'd got diagnosed and had the surgery earlier as it's only now that I realise how bad thing had got - restricted movement, splayed knees when pedalling, max cadence in the low 90's, no golf swing! and long bouts of pain.

Now I feel better than I can ever remember. I can ride further and more often, push my cadence higher (I've even bought an SS for winter commuting) and I'm faster with lower HR over the same routes - fitter, stronger, more efficient action?

Of course knees are completely different from hips, but I think I'd still be inclined to say that getting the surgery sooner rather than later is the best option. Entering into the process in better physical shape should not be underestimated. Not just the general fitness and strength allowing you to recover quicker, but also lower body weight and sufficient years left to achieve new goals. My surgeon repeated many times that my good fitness level and strong legs made the difference in my recovery.

My experience of arthritis is that once it's gotten hold of you it isn't letting go. If you are at the stage where daily medication is required just to get by then I'd say it's time to consider surgery.

I was lucky to have private cover. The NSH would have tried to delay me until I was 50 to minimise the risk of future revision surgery and I believe this often influences a GP's recommendation. Fair enough, they have genuine reasons for this, but if you are suffering then stand your ground.

So my conclusion. If it's your hips and they have got that bad then get them sorted as your current fitness will pay dividends in your recovery. I know very little about knees other than that the surgery is more difficult to recover from, but I'm sure there will be lots of information available on the internet. But in my view the general rule that the fitter you are when you enter the surgery the stronger you'll be during the most important phase of your recovery.

Gotta fly. Work beckon and the bike is ready to go.

Good luck guys.

posted by Bikemonkey [3 posts]
29th November 2013 - 7:17

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I've had ongoing issues since childhood and more recently since being hit by a car, I've recently had a Retul bike fit done and honestly it's helped to improve on and off bike niggles so well, it's never been as comfortable to ride a bike.

While obviously arthritic pain is probably unavoidable, I'd definitely recommend a Retul fit just to accommodate for anything that's going on with your legs/posture. Smile

Might be a bit pricey but you may be able to get some sort of subsidy if you try going through a Dr?

Merlin Cycles women's race team ~ http://www.merlincycles.com
Manx nerd peddler ~ http://mooleur.blogspot.com

mooleur's picture

posted by mooleur [359 posts]
29th November 2013 - 14:24

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I have arthritis- very evident following an accident. I find it is better to cycle more and run less. I do knee strenthening and leg stretching exercises each day. This seems to help and recently I have been eating a small amount of fresh ginger each day - in the hope of keeping the inflamation down. The advice I have been given by the physio is not to stop but keep active!

Sussex Ted

posted by tedred [1 posts]
29th November 2013 - 19:53

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