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Hi,

I have about £1200 maybe a bit more to spend on a new wheelset? I have thought about getting a set of Mavic R-sys wheels or perhaps a dura ace c50 set. Yes I know they are completely different. I guess my question would be what do people think would make the best wheelset for general riding in rolling countryside with a few steep bits thrown in ie southern England riding?

Any suggestions would be appreciated!

Thanks

29 comments

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dunnoh [197 posts] 2 years ago
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I've just got a pair of 2014 Fulcrum 5's and I think they are sliced bread. Ever so happy with them and a joy on the North Wests crater filled roads

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badkneestom [135 posts] 2 years ago
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My 2013 Fulcrum 3's are great. Campy reliability.

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guyondebike [29 posts] 2 years ago
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Get a pair of Pro-lite

Mine have out lasted my Fulcrum racing zeros!

 3

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HammerUK [7 posts] 2 years ago
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Thanks guys. My current wheels are fulcrums which are pretty good I was just looking for something that might help with hanging in their on fast club rides etc. Hence thinking about Dura Ace c50s. Not sure how much speed improvement they would really give!

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SammyG [274 posts] 2 years ago
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New wheels arent going to help.

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abandoneur [18 posts] 2 years ago
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SammyG wrote:

New wheels arent going to help.

True, you could try training properly.

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thebungle [103 posts] 2 years ago
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In that case would you advocate for the cheapest wheels possible?

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700c [819 posts] 2 years ago
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£1200! Wow.

You could consider some alternatives - e.g. there have been some great reductions at CRC recently on Reynolds wheels - both the 32 or the 46. Assume you are happy to go tubular at this price..

I got the 46 recently - they have transformed my ride - sub 1200 grams for an aerodynamic wheelset which climb fantastically. backed by warranty and crash protection plan. They are my general purpose summer wheels, can turn their hand to TT's and are very efficient especially in bunch riding. I don't use them in the wet or on v windy days, however.

But note that the law of diminishing returns will apply. a £1200 wheelset will not be 4 X better than a £300 set!

If you are spending money on equipment some on the forum will always be against this as a concept. I do agree that it's pointless if you don't train much, can't get into an aerodnamic position, or are really fat, but you can have a sensible discussion about equipment and performance with the presumption that you already do all the right things to keep in good shape.

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700c [819 posts] 2 years ago
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update: A quick google of the above wheelset I mentioned shows it at under £1,000 reduced from £1900 at CRC, leaving you change for decent tubs, a spare, glue and more..

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HammerUK [7 posts] 2 years ago
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Thanks for the advice. I have been reluctant to move to tubs due to the ease of changing flats with clinchers. Is there much of a problem with sorting out a flats with tubulars?

Sorry in advance for my ignorance!

Thanks

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Simon E [2546 posts] 2 years ago
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£1200 to keep up with the club run? Fork me! You could get some serious coaching for a lot less than that. Or a motorbike.

Some 50mm aero wheels won't turn a donkey into a racehorse, if you excuse the comparison. Being able to ride safely in the group (if you don't do this already) will save far more watts than some carbon hoops. Also, reducing wheels weight doesn't make as much difference on climbs as you might wish.

A nice handbuilt wheelset and fast-rolling tyres may be a more rewarding investment - it's what I'd get now if I could justify it.

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BBB [296 posts] 2 years ago
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Handuilt:
DT 180 hubs, Sapim CX Ray spokes, Stans Alfa 400 rims.

Then get some tubeless Schwalbe "One" tyres (avail. in Sep) and you're sorted.

Why bother with tubs if tubeless tyres run on wider rims will render them obsolete pretty soon.

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racingcondor [153 posts] 2 years ago
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BBB wrote:

Why bother with tubs if tubeless tyres run on wider rims will render them obsolete pretty soon.

Because they won't. Clinchers will still weigh more at the rim and will still be suceptable to pinch flats.

Clinchers and tubeless have caught up in rolling resistance (and probably win in the fight for Aero thanks to things lke firecrest) but tubs are great.

OP - Fulcrum 3's or RS80's are everything you need in a factory wheel but I wouldn't let that stop you. The C50's are a great allrounder (for a carbon wheel).

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700c [819 posts] 2 years ago
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+ 1 on what Racing Condor wrote. Advantage of tubs is reduced rim weight, also less chance of flats.

Not actually had to change one due to a puncture. This is over 1200 miles so far, but I don't tend to puncture much on clinchers either (touches wood). I carry a spare and some Victoria pit stop sealant canister.

If this is your budget, I think tubular has to be on your list, TBH - carbon clinchers are still somewhat compromised - the best ones less so - but they are above your budget.

£1K+ is a lot to spend on wheels, granted - but of course this is relative and will vary from individual to individual. Some people would say £1K is a lot to spend on a complete bike...

I don't know why Simon E assumes you are spending £1200 'just to keep up with the club run' - but if this is the case, then yes, I would advise training instead!

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700c [819 posts] 2 years ago
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PS wider rims may be the current fad but they are heavier...

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Simon E [2546 posts] 2 years ago
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700c wrote:

I don't know why Simon E assumes you are spending £1200 'just to keep up with the club run' - but if this is the case, then yes, I would advise training instead!

He said:
"I was just looking for something that might help with hanging in their on fast club rides etc."

(I think he means 'hanging in there', as in staying with the group)

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700c [819 posts] 2 years ago
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Oh yeah, I missed that..

OP - train harder!

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BBB [296 posts] 2 years ago
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racingcondor wrote:
BBB wrote:

Why bother with tubs if tubeless tyres run on wider rims will render them obsolete pretty soon.

Because they won't. Clinchers will still weigh more at the rim and will still be suceptable to pinch flats.

Clinchers and tubeless have caught up in rolling resistance (and probably win in the fight for Aero thanks to things lke firecrest) but tubs are great.

Unless e.g. you hit a kerb at 30mph and cut the actual casing you can't have a pinch flat with tubeless tyres. There is nothing to pinch, is there?

Clinchers and tubeless caught up with rolling resistance?
Tubs have never rolled faster than clinchers (comparing THE SAME tyre model). It's only on very rough surfaces (e.g. cobbles) that the ability of running lower pressure without increasing risk of pinch flats results in lower rolling resistance. Also at high speed flats tubs will stay on the rim which helps greatly during a 40mph descent...

I'm pretty sure that improved rolling resistance of tubeless combined with all advantages of tubs will be worth the insignificant weight penalty.
Rolling resistance shouldn't be trivialised.

I agree though that tubs will be still available as niche/retro products, just like down tube shifters, toe clips and quill stems  3

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HammerUK [7 posts] 2 years ago
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Thanks for the comments guys. I really wanted to find out if carbon clinchers eg dura ace c50s for example, would see a noticeable difference over my fulcrums. According to my LBS they wouldn't really so unless I wanted to get Zipps or something similar, which I don't, think I'll stick with the fulcrums! I ride with a lot of pretty decent riders, many of whom have deep section wheels, so wondered if they may help, with maintaining a high speed eg 25mph+ in chain gang rides etc.

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Ian531 [34 posts] 2 years ago
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just a suggestion, why not try
http://petematthews.com/home/

his hand built wheels are superb! Good enough for Sean Yates/Robert Millar etc good enough for me!  4http://petematthews.com/home/index.php/archive

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peasantpigfarmer [46 posts] 2 years ago
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With that investment available, most wheelsets will be light,coupled with some good high end tyres & tubes,should produce faster pace.It definately will feel easier. Tubs do perform well on our rough roads and have better feel,but for everyday riding clinchers are more practical.stick with well known brands,spares for maintainence are easily available should they be required.

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vasgko2 [23 posts] 2 years ago
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Why not?

1. Rose RS 1400

http://www.rosebikes.co.uk/article/rose-road-bike-wheel-set-28700-c-rs-1...

2. Pro Lite Bracciano A27 (although not available right now)

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/pro-lite-bracciano-a27-alloy-clincher-wheelset/

3. Shimano RS80-C24
http://www.rosebikes.co.uk/article/shimano-racing-wheel-set-28700-c-wh-r...

All these wheels are suitable enough for everything. Anything more expensive is not gone help you...

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Mathelo [21 posts] 1 year ago
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I just bought a set of HOOPs 2426 Elite Pacenti 23SL Wheelset with White industries hubs and Sapim CX-Ray spokes custom built from Hoops wheels - http://www.hoopswheels.com/wheels2426e.html. USD$800.00 delivered.

I was upgrading from a set of Shimano RS 20s, decent but run of the mill wheels.

I saved a bit of weight over the RS 20s, about 300 grams, but now have a wider rim, slightly better aero profile, and more efficient hubs.

I have definitely noticed improvements on the climbs and most noticeably on the descents. I ride in very hilly country in Connecticut and on the descents I can keep up with and even pass my son - an accomplished rider - on his aero Cervelo (I'm on a Felt Z2). He is often still spinning and I'm just coasting. The RS 20s did not give me this. It may just be the bearings in the hubs, I don't know, but there is a marked improvement.

I considered the Shimano C24s. They have received very good reviews but parts replacements is a problem that I didn't want to deal with. I don't have that problem with these custom rims and they are performing very well.

Louis

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bashthebox [751 posts] 1 year ago
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I'm just moving onto a set of Pacenti SL23-based wheels too - though mine are laced onto Spin hubs. Only got the rear one for now as I wait for my LBS to get enough spokes in to build the front, but initial feelings are good. The wider rim really does make them feel more planted. Really, really tough to get the bloody tire on though - think the rim's a little tighter due to the tubeless thing.
If anyone's interested, Pete at Rat Race Cycles in Nunhead will build you a lovely pair. THink they're about £550? Something like that.

OP - you don't need to spend £1200 on wheels, though by all means of you've got the disposable, help yourself! If it's better aeroness you're after though, I'd suggest looking at your position and clothes/helmet first. Much cheaper and greater gains to be made there. Also train harder.

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ajmarshal1 [403 posts] 1 year ago
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bashthebox wrote:

I'm just moving onto a set of Pacenti SL23-based wheels too - though mine are laced onto Spin hubs. Only got the rear one for now as I wait for my LBS to get enough spokes in to build the front, but initial feelings are good. The wider rim really does make them feel more planted. Really, really tough to get the bloody tire on though - think the rim's a little tighter due to the tubeless thing.
If anyone's interested, Pete at Rat Race Cycles in Nunhead will build you a lovely pair. THink they're about £550? Something like that.

OP - you don't need to spend £1200 on wheels, though by all means of you've got the disposable, help yourself! If it's better aeroness you're after though, I'd suggest looking at your position and clothes/helmet first. Much cheaper and greater gains to be made there. Also train harder.

Been hankering after a set of Pacenti SL23's. How is the brake surface and the general finish?

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rnarito [46 posts] 1 year ago
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Shimano Dura Ace C24...just as good as carbon!

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bashthebox [751 posts] 1 year ago
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AJMarshall - brake surface is good. Quite thick, lined with concentric circles. One of the big appeals of the rim is that the arch of the inner rim is quite high up, meaning the braking surface is stronger and won't deform under braking - better performance, in other words.
Overall finish is good. Would prefer it if the black paint was matt rather than semi-gloss, but hey.

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tom_w [204 posts] 1 year ago
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HammerUK wrote:

Thanks for the comments guys. I really wanted to find out if carbon clinchers eg dura ace c50s for example, would see a noticeable difference over my fulcrums. According to my LBS they wouldn't really so unless I wanted to get Zipps or something similar, which I don't, think I'll stick with the fulcrums! I ride with a lot of pretty decent riders, many of whom have deep section wheels, so wondered if they may help, with maintaining a high speed eg 25mph+ in chain gang rides etc.

If you're heading for 25mph plus rides then you should start seeing benefits from aero wheels I believe. I fear a lot of the advice you received above may be based on the assumption you were going more slowly than that!

I think the solution to this would be to borrow a set of aero wheels and see if/how much they help, either from a clubmate or see if a local bike shop has a demo set. Reynolds have wheels they lend out for free at some wiggle sportives if you book yourself on early enough too, so they might have a demo set they could send you.

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Leeroy_Silk [114 posts] 1 year ago
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I've not ridden a pair of C50s but came very close to buying a pair, I didn't and here was why.
Pros: Bullet proof hubs, well made durable wheels, Shimano reliability and service (if required).
Cons: To get the rims as light as possible The Aluminum brake surface is very thin, I can't remember the exact figure but it was in the region of 0.8mm. In my mind this surface is basically a wear part and how much wear would it take before it needed replacing? Having asked around I was told that it's easier to replace the entire wheel than just the rim. In my view this was too big an issue for something I was going to be spending big money on.
In dry weather they'd probably last fine but I know full well I'd be crying when riding through a sudden down pour and I could hear all that precious aluminum grinding away.

I also realised that climbing's my biggest nemesis so bought a pair of Fulcrum zeros which I'm happy to report am delighted with.