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Hi there
I have only been cycling for less than a year and have just started to step things up so that I'm doing about 500k a month at the mo. The problem I have is that my lower back is starting to ache after a ride over 2 hours. Any one had this and any possible solutions? bike fitting? spacers?
I'm middle aged, not over weight and not flexible (gah this sounds like a Guardian Soulmates ad) :  26

10 comments

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Super Domestique [1615 posts] 4 years ago
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Bike fit.

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arrieredupeleton [581 posts] 4 years ago
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Become more flexible. Tight Hamstrings and IT bands in particular can have a knock-on effect to lower back muscles. There's loads of exercises on t'interweb to loosen these up a little.

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YorkshireMike [92 posts] 4 years ago
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Super Domestique wrote:

Bike fit.

Definitely bike fit. I had a similar problem and after comparing my positioning with those who had their bike fitted properly, I found that my frame was too big (it was second hand - my first road bike) and I was stretched out. Even after shortening the stem, I found that my positioning was all out from my saddle to my pedals to my bars.
Now I'm on a well-fitted bike, I can go for hours without any discomfort besides the burn in my guns, and at least that's a nice discomfort!  16

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YorkshireMike [92 posts] 4 years ago
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YorkshireMike wrote:
Super Domestique wrote:

Bike fit.

Definitely bike fit. I had a similar problem and after comparing my positioning with those who had their bike fitted properly, I found that my frame was too big (it was second hand - my first road bike) and I was stretched out. Even after shortening the stem, I found that my positioning was all out from my saddle to my pedals to my bars.
Now I'm on a well-fitted bike, I can go for hours without any discomfort besides the burn in my guns, and at least that's a nice discomfort!  16

Just to add: I've also known people to get back pain from having too small a frame, particularly on longer rides.

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dave atkinson [6301 posts] 4 years ago
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I tilt my saddle forwards just a touch and i find it really helps. i have to fight off the spirit level brigade every time i post a pic of a bike i'm riding on here, but i can deal with that  1

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Mr Jono [102 posts] 4 years ago
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Definitely a bike fit, and try core exercises regularly. I had the same problems as you but both of the above have reduced my pain considerably. I comfortably ride 70 miles+ before I get the sort of pain I was getting previously at 50miles.

Try these:
http://www.bicycling.com/training-nutrition/training-fitness/core

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Bedfordshire Clanger [345 posts] 4 years ago
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Get a fitting. If you've been riding for a while then it's quite possible that your saddle is too high or something else isn't quite right. Saddle too high is a common problem which results in your hips rocking slightly when you pedal leading to back pain. Search the web for Steve Hogg's bike fitting web site, there is loads of useful advice on there.

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Bedfordshire Clanger [345 posts] 4 years ago
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I've just had a look at your profile, try going back to Condor during a quiet period and see if they will take a look at you on your bike on a turbo.

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foxyloxy [49 posts] 4 years ago
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Bike fit for sure,66yrs old,riding for 57yrs,never had lower back ache,but do sometimes get a bit of neck ache,especially on cold winter rides after 2/3 hrs.

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OldnSlo [137 posts] 4 years ago
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Another cause (from my personal experience & er'indoors) is glute's not firing, your large and small butt muscles should be one of the first muscle groups to 'fire' when taking a load. If this doesn't happen the body compensates by using another muscle group.If not rectified this can cause disc problems, for which er'doors has had three ops, one of which being a repair job (loss of spinal fluid causing the brain to sink!). So, it's most probably a bike fit problem but go and a visit a sports masseur/physio if you haven't done so already. They should be able to recommend stretches as well as strengthening exercises.
TTFN