TRIBAN 3 size guide help??

by 60kg lean keen climbing machine   January 4, 2013  

Any one own a Btwin Triban 3? I am just thinking of buying an new bike, but as it is now post credit crunch I will not be able to spend as I wish (Wife/children need feeding/clothing ect). I want a proper set of wheels but finding the right bike second hand that will fit me for the right price and spec is hard and I am giving up hope! I am 5,5 and have a 31' inside leg I read on RCC under £500 road bikes that the Carrera TDF and the Btwin are now for sale at £300 but the Bbtwin has carbon forks and is getting good reviews. My problem is, I can go and sit on the TDF but will have to buy the Btwin blind! The Sizing guide online is not to me definitive and does not fill me with confidence (if I ring up the store will I be able to speak to some one who rides?). Do I need the 48cm or should I go for the 51cm? I currently ride hybrid that has a compact 17' frame so I have got used to a lot of standover and a shorter top tube (I am also now getting a bit older too!!), My previous road bike is pre children and is long gone! Please could some one in the know give me some advice as to what is best for me.

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I have a Triban 3 for commuting/knocking about town on, I'm 5'7" with a 31" inside leg. Went for the 54cm and even though I've put a smaller head stem on it I'm still finding it a bit too big for me.
I think I've read online somewhere the 51cm has smaller wheels thus making tyre selection a bit harder, can't find the link at the minute...this is probably not helping you at all, soz.

posted by The Acai [12 posts]
4th January 2013 - 18:04

24 Likes

The French site has a neat measurement slider:
http://www.decathlon.fr/velo-route-triban-3-id_8167038.html

According to that a 51cm is suitable for anyone from 159cm to 166cm tall. A 48cm is suitable for 150cm to 158cm.

Based on your height of 165cm it looks like the 51cm size is better suited to you, however with your inside leg measurement your upper body is going to be shorter . . .

There's no substitute for actually trying a bike out for size . . .

manoirdelourde's picture

posted by manoirdelourde [28 posts]
4th January 2013 - 18:40

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I posted a reply, but it contained a URL so the mods have quarantined it for review . . .

if you take a look at the french decathlon site (.fr) and look at the Triban 3 sizing info they have a slider thing to help work out the best size for you.

i also posted some other comments, but they will have to wait until the other post has been cleared . ..

manoirdelourde's picture

posted by manoirdelourde [28 posts]
4th January 2013 - 19:12

26 Likes

^
Some really good useful advice there.

posted by Super Domestique [1600 posts]
4th January 2013 - 20:16

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Thank you all for your posts Smile I may well have to find a store and go for the long drive.

posted by 60kg lean keen ... [56 posts]
4th January 2013 - 21:45

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Just curious-the only road bike I've ridden (since 50 years ago anyway) is the TdF, so I've no experience of carbon forks. Do they make that much difference and how good are the carbon forks on a £300 bike?

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posted by Crosshouses [190 posts]
5th January 2013 - 17:08

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I am no authority but from what little I know carbon forks they should weight less but give a more forgiving ride, control and feel though the bars . I would agree that is funds allowed I would buy a better group set, wheels ect on a Aluminium or Steel frame bike than go for a lower rent spec just for a Carbon frame or fork! Also yes, some chepo carbon stuff is very bad and not worth the hype. I would agree with you about the TDF as it has a good spec and at £300 it is very well priced it also has many fans who hold it in high regard, but the Btwin has been getting good reviews also. If you look at Cycling Active January there big feature “cycle west” page 98 that is done on a Btwin Triban 3 that is enough for me to prove its a good bike for the money and the carbon in the fork is not of a low rent worthless quality to put me off! Big Grin

posted by 60kg lean keen ... [56 posts]
5th January 2013 - 21:06

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Hi there, I'm a newbie of the 50+ variety and looked at various bikes 'in the flesh' and got quite confused. Saw a v good review of the Triban 3 in a monthly cycling mag and took the plunge - my theory being that these guys review bikes for a living so have more of an idea than i have. I drove down to the Birmingham store and I have to say that the staff could not have been more helpful. Tried a bike for size, they set it up and I had a bit of a ride around the store, which I realise is not really a test ride, but the price was right and I was happy. Done about 5 hundred miles on it now plus many evenings on a turbo and it is great. recently rode it to my favourite bike shop and the owner is quite impressed with it for the price. Also, for what it is worth, Decathlon do some good kit a very reasonable prices. I am not suggesting that it is the top level kit but for a beginner like me lycra shorts at £7.99 have got me cycling, got me enjoying the experience and building the miles etc without breaking the bank whilst learning more. In short I can wholeheartedly recommend the bike and Decathlon for beginners like me. Good luck and enjoy the learning curve, it's great.

mange poo Rodney, mange poo

posted by Trebor [3 posts]
6th January 2013 - 11:58

25 Likes

I own 2 decathlon bikes and whilst I am still a fan, I cannot recommend enough that you buy another brand. Are you able to put just that little bit more towards the bike so that you can buy a Canyon? Or maybe even one of the Ribble winter bikes which I understand retail at around 5-600?

Decathlon put some very cheap components on their lower priced bikes which quickly need to be replaced.

I have a btwin sport road bike.

posted by londonplayer [671 posts]
6th January 2013 - 16:13

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londonplayer wrote:
I own 2 decathlon bikes and whilst I am still a fan, I cannot recommend enough that you buy another brand. Are you able to put just that little bit more towards the bike so that you can buy a Canyon? Or maybe even one of the Ribble winter bikes which I understand retail at around 5-600?

Decathlon put some very cheap components on their lower priced bikes which quickly need to be replaced.

I have a btwin sport road bike.

The thing about the Decathlon bikes with cheap components is that you'll see the very same bits fitted to bikes costing 50 to 80% more. The Triban 3 is just a great, low-risk buy for someone dipping their toes in the drop bars/roadbike water.

I'd say that spending less than the price of a Triban 3 is a false economy and upgraded wheels and tyres takes the bike's capability up a lot. For the average, casual cyclist spending on the marginal gains of carbon, Dura Ace group set and fancy race rubber is going to be irrelevant.

posted by Campag_10 [153 posts]
6th January 2013 - 20:10

27 Likes

I've had a Triban 3 since last July. First road bike for 25 years so didn't want to spend too much. I'm quite happy with it, but at 6'6" and 29" leg I fitted a 51 frame. In common with the other Decathlon road bikes I've seen in this size, it has 650c wheels. This does limit tyre choice (but the choices are good tyres luckily) and I've not found ready made mudguards: butchered some 26" MTB ones. But its a great bike for the price and I didn't even realise the wheel size until I'd had it a couple weeks (wheels and frame are in proportion so its not obvious, honest!)
Hope this helps
David

posted by DavidG [2 posts]
8th January 2013 - 22:28

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Late to this, but you asked the question: "if I ring up the store will I be able to speak to some one who rides?"

Absolutely. It's always been one of Decathlon's points of difference in France and elsewhere that their staff actually participate in the sports they focus on selling (and in cycling that means something more than just riding a bike to work).

Simon_MacMichael's picture

posted by Simon_MacMichael [8098 posts]
9th January 2013 - 0:34

29 Likes