Help! Advice needed on new rear wheel

by nickwadd   January 2, 2013  

Hello,

My rear wheel on my road bike has developed a nasty looking crack, necessitating a new purchase. The guy at Evans (only bike shop open today near me) suggested I get a Mavic http://www.evanscycles.com/products/mavic/2012-aksium-rear-wheel-ec03331 as it would suit my needs. I rode 3500km last year, 90% of which was commuting on potholey roads. I'll probably end up stumping up for the Mavic but wondered if anyone has any advice on a good, cheap(ish) wheel for commuting. Speediness it not a major consideration and can be sacrificed for sturdiness.

Any suggestions/recommendations would be most welcome.

9 user comments

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Why not upgrade both wheels?

Can't go wrong with the Aksiums.

On my new bike, I've done a bit of research, and my training wheels are going to be Shimano RS10's. These are a fair bit cheaper than the Aksiums, but I know that you can get wheel/tyre bundles from Mavic.

Sir Velo

Raleigh's picture

posted by Raleigh [1725 posts]
2nd January 2013 - 17:32

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Depends on the bike... if you spent a grand or more then it would be worth looking at Fulcrum Racing 5's - a bit more than the Mavics but you will notice the difference. I have found both the Mavics and the Fulcrums to last really well, I have used them both for winter training.

posted by jimmo62 [59 posts]
2nd January 2013 - 18:18

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Agree with Jimmy. I have Fulcrum 5s on my good bike, and Aksiums on my commuter, coupled with 700cx28 conti tyres.

I was lucky and got a pair of Mavics for about £135 from Merlin, but you can still get a pair of 2012 wheels for under £175 if you look around. They're cracking wheels for the price.

posted by thereandbackagain [151 posts]
2nd January 2013 - 18:55

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How heavy are you and how much extra gear to you carry with you when you commute? Mavic Aksiums are pretty tough but they are training wheels rather than commuter wheels. If you are carrying a lot of gear in panniers or weigh north of 90kg, I would recommend going for a handbuilt 36 spoke wheel rather than a factory racing or training wheel. The handbuilt will be easier to service or rebuild if you ever need it doing. You will be able to choose a wider rim than you would get with any off the shelf racing wheel too which will add rigidity and durability. Most factory wheels come in sets, whereas you'll be able to get exactly what you want with a hand built wheel and won't be left with a spare front wheel that you never use.

Ah! Condor

posted by Bedfordshire Clanger [304 posts]
2nd January 2013 - 20:25

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Thanks folks,

the bike is a Boardman Team Comp 2010 and cost about 550 in the Xmas sale a couple of years ago. I'll have a look at the Fulcrums but they sound like they are for a better bike! The RS10s do look OK though.

Can't say a bad thing about conti tyres either - went 2012 with zero punctures thanks to those guys.

I weigh around 95kg but rarely carry anything extra - sometimes a laptop in a rucksack but not often. That said I take on board what you've said about the Mavics - commuting is the priority here. Also getting back on the bike asap is key as well. Its a half hour ride or a 90 minute public transport slog to work so getting it sorted quickly is important. I'll have a ring round the LBS's tomorrow to see what they can offer as there are a few of them around where I live (Esher, Surrey).

Thanks again folks for taking the time to respond - much appreciated.

posted by nickwadd [23 posts]
2nd January 2013 - 21:13

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If you do go for a factory set, consider Fulcrum Racing 7. The are heavy in comparision to racing wheels but very tough and rigid. They are a bit stiffer than Racing 5 and can often be picked up quite cheaply if you look around. £110 at JE James and bike-discount.de by the looks of things.

Ah! Condor

posted by Bedfordshire Clanger [304 posts]
2nd January 2013 - 21:28

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If your commuting on pot-holed (crevices around here) then go for the CX version of any of the above - built for the rough stuff.

To slo to live, to slo to die! ::-}

posted by OldnSlo [121 posts]
2nd January 2013 - 23:34

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OldnSlo wrote:
If your commuting on pot-holed (crevices around here) then go for the CX version of any of the above - built for the rough stuff.

They also tend to be better sealed, certainly the Fulcrum CX ones are, so should stand up to poor conditions for longer.

posted by thereandbackagain [151 posts]
3rd January 2013 - 13:36

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Thanks Folks,

Picked up a Rear Aksium for £108 at Sigma Sports this lunchtime. I like the idea of the CX ones but went for something I can get immediately and get back on the bike tomorrow.

Bought the required tools as well for my first attempt at a cassette transfer tonight so hopefully that all won't end in tears.

Thanks again for your help!

posted by nickwadd [23 posts]
3rd January 2013 - 15:32

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