Etape du Tour 2013 - info please?

by wjputt   October 16, 2012  

I am a re-born cyclist of sorts & I have been getting the kms in. I am trying to get them in and also to have a goal for next year. Aiming to ride 10000 kms in next year & also contemplating the Etape du Tour. So a few questions:

When is it likely to be?
How long is it?
What is the Act 1 Act 2 thing?
How does one need to prepare?
Which is the best website to get more info and sign up?
Is it only possible to sign up via commercial companies?
Any info will be gratefully received.

Thank you,

John

12 user comments

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It will be announced on 24th October. Here is the best place to find out http://www.asochallenge.com/?language=en

Act 1 and Act 2 are two different stages taken from the TdF and opened up as Etape challenges.

You can read about this years here

Act 1
http://www.letapedutour.com/ET1/us/homepage.html

Act 2
http://www.letapedutour.com/ET2/us/homepage.html

From my little knowledge, you have to be very quick to sign up and get a place.

As for training http://www.sportstoursinternational.co.uk/cycling/etape-du-tour

Quote:
Very Important Please be aware, the L'Etape du Tour is a serious cyclo sportive. It is ridden at a strong pace and if you are not quick enough, you will be swept up by the Broom Wagon on one of the climbs or even earlier, so it is important to do a lot of training can be focussed in the months preceeding the event. You should be able to ride on the flat at a pace of 25/27kph (minimum) and be able to climb in the mountains at over 12/15 kph, even for the steepest sections, and your stamina really must be good enough to last the full distance. If not, you will fail to finish, which is not what you or the event organisers want. So, you must get yourself a good training plan

Gkam84's picture

posted by Gkam84 [8645 posts]
16th October 2012 - 21:16

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Hey check out French cycling holidays also do handy bike delivery service to your hotel, better than relying on air transport

posted by paulbburgoine [9 posts]
16th October 2012 - 21:39

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Thanks Gkam84 - most helpful. Have you ridden it?

posted by wjputt [44 posts]
16th October 2012 - 21:44

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Nope, never ridden it, I don't have the Jens "shut up legs" mentality, If you drop back you are out. Even if you've only done 20 miles. As soon as the broom wagon is near you, thats the end of your day because they HAVE to clear the road by a set time. So they just take you off the road.

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posted by Gkam84 [8645 posts]
16th October 2012 - 21:54

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I did the Etape this year (Act 1) and in a word it was Brutal! Loved and hated every minute of it, but a great experience and I would definitely do it again (even though I said I wouldn't immediately after). 8,000 cyclists on the start area in the morning is an experience in its own!

I wanted to do it on the cheap so myself and a friend drove down a few days before and camped about 10km away from the start town. All in all we reckon we spent about £200 each just on travel, accommodation and food for the few days we were there.......this is considerably cheaper than the hotel/tour deals that are on offer but I guess this only appeals depending on your budget. Waking up at 4.30am on 'race' day in the p**sing rain wasn't very nice though....and we had to roll an extra 10km to the start area as well.

Training wise my major mistake was that I didn't cycle enough hills before hand....I could do the distance no problem, but this is pointless if you haven't been up hill much. I struggled from about 3 hours onwards really. There really isn't anything in the UK which compares to the Alps, they are relentless.....uphill for 25km at between 5-8% is slow and painful.

I could literally go on and on about it but my top tips from my experience this year are:

- sign up early
- get your accommodation and travel arrangements sorted very early!
- get there earlier than 2 days in advance - 3 days should be fine but we never really had time to relax before hand. I would have liked to have spent a few days in the area afterwards but sadly had to leave the next day.
- write a proper training plan, just cycle up hill all the time
- Make sure you have enough kit for all weather conditions......seriously!

Other than that good luck!

Ben Burns's picture

posted by Ben Burns [61 posts]
16th October 2012 - 22:01

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Ben, would you recommend, if someone could do it, getting there, say a week early and going over the course and getting some practice on the climbs?

What about your food intake on the day? Were there plenty of places set up to pick stuff up or was it a case of taking whatever you needed with you?

Gkam84's picture

posted by Gkam84 [8645 posts]
16th October 2012 - 22:43

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If you can get there a week early that would be good, the biggest shock to me was how long the climbs went on for so if you can get some practise in before hand that should be worthwhile!

Food intake on the day.....I took a lot with me in the morning and didn't end up eating it all. There are 3 feed stops from memory with loads of food and drink available, I was towards the back of the field and there was still plenty left when I got to each one. At the beginning I was taking gels and bars etc but after a while I ended up taking on some 'proper' food. I didn't eat or drink enough though...

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posted by Ben Burns [61 posts]
17th October 2012 - 10:28

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Hi, I did both Acte I and II this year (and a couple more in previous years) and as Ben said they are tough going and its difficult to recreate the Alpine climbs for training purposes in this country. They are definitely doable with a solid Winter and Spring of training in the legs, and I'd recommend some specific turbo sessions to practise the climbing pace required (Sufferfest have one..Angels?),or even better get some proper training booked in the spring. Don't ignore the weather either, in 2009 and last year (Acte Sleepy the temparature was in the high 90s and you need to be ready for that too. This year Acte II was the polar (almost!) opposite; cold and wet in the Pyrenees and a long (201km)day in the saddle.
That said the Etape is a great experience and worth the pain and suffering! Good luck!! Brendan

posted by SPAM Naval [134 posts]
17th October 2012 - 11:02

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Both Acts in one year....pretty impressive! From what I read only a couple of hundred people managed to complete both this year.

Yes good point on the turbo trainer.....I didn't have one and definitely missed a few weeks of training due to the weather.

I'm thinking of doing the Paris-Roubaix challenge next year but sounds like a bike breaker?

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posted by Ben Burns [61 posts]
17th October 2012 - 12:32

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Thanks folks - some really helpful tips here. I am a teacher so I doubt that I will be able to get enough time off to get out for days ahead of the Etape. I assume that it is a weekend event though.

A few more questions:

Do Acte 1 & Acte 2 happen concurrently?
Do most people ride it with a group of mates or go solo?

posted by wjputt [44 posts]
17th October 2012 - 18:56

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The Paris-Roubaix is the enfer du nord is it not? Is that in the spring? It is a day race but what is the length of the sportive please?

posted by wjputt [44 posts]
17th October 2012 - 20:28

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wjputt wrote:

A few more questions:

Do Acte 1 & Acte 2 happen concurrently?
Do most people ride it with a group of mates or go solo?

They are normally a week/ish apart. This year they were 6 days apart.

I don't know about riding styles. But if it was me, I'd be trying to keep with a group and contribute to it. Find a group that are going at your pace rather than struggling at the back of a fast group

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posted by Gkam84 [8645 posts]
17th October 2012 - 20:41

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