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It's a little project I've been meaning to get round to for a while, and with the onset of winter (sorry) I thought I'd get round to it.

I basically have a 1999 Dawes Giro, which is 7spd and has a screw on freewheel type hub.

What will I need to make the conversion?

The bike will really only be used for commuting, the commute is all flat. So, ratios wise (I really know very little about this) what should I looking at?
I'm quite a strong cyclist, but then sometimes in the morning I can't be arsed to put much effort in, so don't want something that will be a nightmare to push if this is the case.

Thanks in advance.  39
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10 comments

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dave atkinson [6307 posts] 5 years ago
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does it have sloping slot dropouts?

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Raleigh [1667 posts] 5 years ago
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This is pretty good stuff;

http://sheldonbrown.com/singlespeed.html

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_Karlos_ [52 posts] 5 years ago
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Cheers.
Sorry forgot to mention, it has vertical dropouts.

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giff77 [1270 posts] 5 years ago
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Hey Karlos. Shimano do a freewheel single speed cog. You can get on CRC for £22 I think. I use the 17t but I have a couple of hills on my commute. You'll need to pick up a single speed chain. I recommend the small chain ring (I'm assuming it's a 38 and also helps with the chainline) Also if you have skewers ditch the rear ones for nuts. And that will stop the rear wheel slipping. Either that or get a chain tensioner. Otherwise you will be retesioning the chain every few days. Hope that helps
Giff

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Raleigh [1667 posts] 5 years ago
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Will be difficult to get the right chain tension on verts, may need a tensioner, or a different frame.

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Raleigh [1667 posts] 5 years ago
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Ratios, 48x15 will probably be good for flat commuting, 42 for rolling, you'll need to be very careful about chainline and tension.

Anything less, and you'll spin out on tiny descents, anything more, and if there's a headwind, you'll be overgeared.

You could just buy a track wheel off planet x, then the conversion would be easier.

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dave atkinson [6307 posts] 5 years ago
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best way to get good chain tension on vertical dropouts is with an ENO hub - not cheap though  39

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russyparkin [570 posts] 5 years ago
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dave_atkinson wrote:

best way to get good chain tension on vertical dropouts is with an ENO hub - not cheap though  39

yes agreed with this, made by white industries. you wont go far wrong contacting 'charlie the bikemonger'

very helpful

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Gkam84 [9104 posts] 5 years ago
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I have to agree with Dave about the ENO hub, thats why i'm taking his s/s off his hands.

But if you don't have the cash to splash on something like that. Then something like this would do you fine without changing much apart from cassette and chainset  3http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/DMR-Single-Speed-Convertor-Tensioner-STS-Twin-...

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charliemac74 [190 posts] 5 years ago
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Check out Sheldon Brown's site mentioned above, I converted an old frame with vertical dropouts and a cracked gear hanger using his tip for cutting down the axle length. Using that fix and a half link I sorted an fixed wheel with limited fuss that could take a range of ratio's.