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Given the thread about the disc equipped Colnago in the news section, I am sure opinion will be somewhat divided as whether or not this a road (excuse the pun) the UCI should or even will go down.

The technology makes sense (anyone with hydro discs on their mtb will verify I am sure) but, for me ay least, there is an element of spoiling the classic look of a road bike.

However, where does this leave the huge volume of current bikes? Some of which are not exactly cheap. So if you are / were about to spend a fair wedge of cash on your next machine would this possible development cause you to hold fire?

How will this effect prices of current bike shop stock?

When the move to discs happened in the mtb world there was the trickle down of technology but as the sport was and is a technology arms fest and without the long years of tradition to baulk against it was far easier(or at least it seems) to make the transition.

Just interested in your thoughts...

16 comments

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Tony Farrelly [2868 posts] 4 years ago
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Well, I already ride with discs on my Roadrat - I suppose it isn't a classic looking road bike, but I think it looks great with discs - it certainly stops great.

I'd also say that we'll probably get used to the look of discs on a road bike pretty quickly.

As for all those rim-braked road bikes? Think they'll be around for a while yet. Full suspension never killed off the hardtail MTB and downtube levers carried on on road bikes for ages after STIs came in.

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Super Domestique [1596 posts] 4 years ago
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I agree about the FS v HT thing with mtb's but they have become tools for different jobs or riding styles.

When it comes to brakes though as the disc trend grew it became just the lower end/entry level mtb that wore v brakes (and still do).

I am sure that discs on road bikes will start at the top end of course and trickle down. However there are many rather top end (read expensive) road bikes which could be sat on shop floors or require a hefty discount to move them on. Same with framesets.

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joemmo [1164 posts] 4 years ago
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having built up 2 bikes last year I'm not in a rush to make a change but discs will definitely be on my shopping list in X years time when I inevitably get itchy for another bike.

regarding the aesthetics - it's entirely subjective, yes the rotors look a bit clunky at the moment but on the flipside, you get a lovely clean appearance at the fork crown and seatstays.

regarding price and practicality, I reckon the cable to hydro' converters are a very sensible option and should open up the market to people who can't or won't pay for the inevitably expensive hydro-electric brake levers.

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arrieredupeleton [575 posts] 4 years ago
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Have a look at this thread for an idea of aesthetics:

http://road.cc/content/forum/54093-colnago-c59-disc-what-do-we-think-then

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Fringe [1047 posts] 4 years ago
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i'm all for disc brakes on road bikes, but the hydraulic kind more than cable ones. and will be esp. good in this country in the winter, (and summer if its anything like last year).
also think that i'd be far more likely to purchase disc brakes over electronic shifting for my next bike.

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Ciclismo [21 posts] 4 years ago
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I had to get of all my bikes when we moved back to Europe just over a year ago and I've been holding off getting a new road bike until there's a decent hydro-lever. Preferably Shimano  4

I personally not only prefer the disc look, but I am very fond of the idea of not wearing out any rims.

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Super Domestique [1596 posts] 4 years ago
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Not saying I agree with this but thought it might be of interest

http://www.bikerumor.com/2012/02/14/road-bike-disc-brakes-are-coming-but...

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trikeman [309 posts] 4 years ago
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 41 Well done SD for finding this, one of the best reads I've had for a while.

Braking is always going to be a compromise between all the factors raised in the write-up, it's a difficult nut to crack so to speak.
In a previous role I worked in advanced electronic brake developments for a major truck manufacturer and every 'eurika' moment where we thought we could get better braking out of a component - bang - problems in another area. I can sympathise with the developers on the bike scene as weight v cost v efficiancy v looks is always going to be a headache.
I have hydraulic discs on my hybrid and MTB and never had a problem, as for rim brakes on my road bikes, not had a problem there either,,,,,, prefer the discs in the driving rain though - there again, not going so fast then  13

I suppose they could start looking at F1 with the carbon brakes etc,,,, 'Eurika' oh' damn now the cost, etc etc etc.

Let's wait and see, or at least that's what I think I'll do.

Regards

Trikeman.  3

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Super Domestique [1596 posts] 4 years ago
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Glad you enjoyed it.

Has the UCI approved the use of discs on road bikes as well as cross?

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Super Domestique [1596 posts] 4 years ago
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Another question to you all - would the impending technology advancement stop you purchasing your next bike quite as soon?

ie. say you were about to buy at the price point £1500-£2000. (I use that as Cycling Plus just tested that range) You might try and get Di2 in there but Alu frame (Canyon) or the Focus that gets you the same frame as the team bike, etc.

However, would this make you 'hold fire' until there is some trickle down techology?

At the moment you could purchase an entry level Trek, Spesh, Giant, etc and feel you are on a trickle down version of what you see the pro's on (not exactly but you get my point) which will change dramatically if the top end/pros run discs and the 'rest' have rim brakes.

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Super Domestique [1596 posts] 4 years ago
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matrs [55 posts] 4 years ago
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I had several years away from road riding following a serious crash with a car, I continued riding my mountain bikes and made the move to disk brakes. Back on my road bike again now and looking forward to the day I can weld some disk mounts to my frame.

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russyparkin [570 posts] 4 years ago
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i have just bought a new bike and am perfectly happy with 'old fashioned' calipers. disks will no doubt be great but i will be in no rush to stick my old hat new bike on ebay for peanuts to upgrade to disks. the first round of releases will no doubt be slightly compromised with little after market goodies anyway, so im happy to wait until my new bike needs changing

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Bobbys boys [76 posts] 4 years ago
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I'm confused. The reason disks are good on MTB is the rims get wet and muddy and you have lots of rubber on the road. If my rims don't get wet on my road bike and the stopping distance is limited by when I go into a skid then why do disks help? They weigh more and don't stop a dry road bike any quicker?

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fiftyacorn [89 posts] 4 years ago
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I wonder if a front disc will be the way to go - you can replace your forks, and front wheel as an upgrade to your current bike

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Mr Will [91 posts] 4 years ago
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Bobbys boys wrote:

I'm confused. The reason disks are good on MTB is the rims get wet and muddy and you have lots of rubber on the road. If my rims don't get wet on my road bike and the stopping distance is limited by when I go into a skid then why do disks help? They weigh more and don't stop a dry road bike any quicker?

You must have one of those carbon bikes that melts in rain  3 Some of us do use road bikes in traffic in all conditions and while we cope with rim brakes, discs would be a definite improvement!

The other big gain is increased control/modulation, allowing you to get closer to the limit of grip with less effort. After all, an MTB on mud has less grip than a road bike, but discs still have advantages in that situation.