new cycle store

by estiel   November 24, 2011  

Hi all.
I am currently in the process of designing an on-line store to sell primarily cycle clothing and accessories.
Eventually I would like to be as large (if not larger) as wiggle or evans ect. I know I am a very long way off at the moment but then again I have to start somewhere.
I was wondering if anyone had any start up advice or any ideas of what they would like to see from a new cycle shop.

8 user comments

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Are you just going to be a retailer or a designer and maker of cycle clothing, but if your just doing to retail, i'd suggest looking at something else

In an online market where people can buy things the world over, cycle clothing is one thing that can be bought alot cheaper and not get a fake from abroad, to start out you'll need to be putting in large orders with the manufacturers of the clothing to be able to get a decent price and be able to make any profit

But that being said, all i'd like to add to what you should stock, is ladies cycle clothing, that seems to be in HUGE demand lately as regards size and comfort, there doesn't seem to be alot of variety for them

Gkam84's picture

posted by Gkam84 [8859 posts]
24th November 2011 - 16:35

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Sourcing goods at a low enough price was always going to be my main issue. I was initially planning to start small with mainly accessories i.e arm warmers leg warmers and so on and build on my range from there as the bulk buy cost is relatively low.
But definitely woman specific lines as like you say the demand is definitely growing.
Thanks for that Smile

posted by estiel [13 posts]
24th November 2011 - 17:19

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Have you any market data that there is a need for this?

Do you have a USP?

Do you know ALL costs? Shipping, warehouse, taxes, electricity, webdesigner, Paypal (or similar) fee, etc etc?

If you're unsure about any of the above 3, you have a lot of work to to..

When people (Sleepy browse the web its always to find the best deal possible.

Also, I have found that even the larger sites don't offer all brands. Though there is probably a reason.

seabass89's picture

posted by seabass89 [235 posts]
24th November 2011 - 22:06

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Gkam84 wrote:
Are you just going to be a retailer or a designer and maker of cycle clothing, but if your just doing to retail, i'd suggest looking at something else

In an online market where people can buy things the world over, cycle clothing is one thing that can be bought alot cheaper and not get a fake from abroad, to start out you'll need to be putting in large orders with the manufacturers of the clothing to be able to get a decent price and be able to make any profit

But that being said, all i'd like to add to what you should stock, is ladies cycle clothing, that seems to be in HUGE demand lately as regards size and comfort, there doesn't seem to be alot of variety for them

I second your opinion, going to be a hard world to break into. Noticed that some others seem to be starting the womens specific thing too found one today whilst shopping for mrs D. www.izzivelo.com

posted by ooh shiny bits [5 posts]
24th November 2011 - 22:47

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Women's specific with a range of prices. Some sites offer women specific but it's only in an expensive range whereas the men's choice is low, medium or high price range. More often than not if I want more than one item, say Gloves and Jacket I will end up ordering from two different sites because of lack of variety (then you are paying double postage on times). Can be frustrating. Having said that there's far more choice on-line than in most cycling shops. Fortunately, I have a local shop run by a woman and she stocks 50/50 male/female gear. Fab! 5 cycle shops within 20 miles of me and only 1 stocks women's gear - Women love to shop, cycling retailers are missing a trick there! Smile

shollin's picture

posted by shollin [51 posts]
25th November 2011 - 20:48

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Must admit Wiggle is my supplier of choice.

Their biggest plus for me is the selection. If I want four or five things I'll generally take a slight hit on price and order from them rather than four or five separate orders. And I'm talking in-stock here - there's nothing more annoying than ordering something and not be told it is out of stock - I'm likely to cancel in those circumstances (so beware Tredz!)

The only plus for Evans is their high street presence if I'm desparate. They're an outlet of last resort. Largely due to price.

So, a big selection and a better price than Wiggle, and I'm sold.

Pete

PeteH's picture

posted by PeteH [159 posts]
28th November 2011 - 23:58

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PeteH wrote:

So, a big selection and a better price than Wiggle, and I'm sold.

That would be great, but unless as a start up you have millions to invest in stock, its never going to become a reality to compete with established retailers like Wiggle and Evans

I think what you REALLY REALLY need to look for is a niche market, something the big retailers aren't selling or aren't interested in at the moment

I can't think of any examples, so i'll just go with glasses for an example

For instance, if every retailer was selling sunglasses in a range of smoke and dark lenses, but the trend was people buying clear or orange, then get in there before they do and make some profit before the big guns pick up on it

At the end of the day, if you start selling something and do well at it, there are going to be a number of things happen

1, you'll make profit
2, you'll be a port of call for loyal buyers
3, the big guys will latch on to your profits and get stock in of whats selling and undercut you

There are many more things that could/will happen but if you can get in there first with some products you stand a chance of making money and getting known

Gkam84's picture

posted by Gkam84 [8859 posts]
29th November 2011 - 0:58

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Further to Gkam84's comment, I think a reasonable example is merino wool jerseys. You can plump for Rapha or Cervo Rosso and leave your wallet begging for mercy, or to a lesser extent, shuttvr. I don't know how realistic it would be to drive costs down on this stuff (the wool has to come from NZ for a start...), but I think you could do far worse than looking at this guy:

http://www.oregoncyclewear.com/woolcyclingjerseys.html

Think up a cool design, order a bunch to get the economies of scale ($56/£40 for a long sleeve wool jersey when buying 15+), and I think if you could sell them on for less than the current UK offerings, or the price I could buy one by ordering from him direct, then you could be on to a winner. I'll buy one!

Last night I would have considered trading a very loud baby for a really nice bike.

posted by notfastenough [3198 posts]
3rd December 2011 - 22:09

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