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 First off, I don't  really need to change my brake hose, but I can't stand the look of the big chunky Shiamno easy hose connector, so I'm switching to normal hoses - and cutting down the hoses to the correct size whilst I'm at it. In addition to this, I need to build up an Endurace frameset for my other half (I assume that uses the same cable tie hose grommet in the down tube...

Does anyone know how to replace the rear brake hose in an Ultimate/Endurace?

Seeing as the brake hose goes through a cable tie (connected to a grommet between the bottle cage bolt holes), if I were to take out the hose, how am I to re-thread the hose through the cable to tie to prevent the hose rattling?!

My current idea/solution is to thread a steel brake cable through the hose, remove the hose (leaving the brake cable routed internally) before installing the new hose over the old cable and therefore through the cable tie.

I imagine I may need to change the cable tie (as the one currently installed will be too tight to get through a new hose), but I have no idea yet!

Cheers

13 comments

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part_robot [304 posts] 5 months ago
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It's straightforward if you're willing to sacrifice the cable tie (and deal with the swearing and anger that follows trying fit a new one). 1) remove the rubber bits that go into the frame 2) release the old hose at both ends 3) very throughly clean all the oil off the outside or you won't be able to 4) tape the end of the old hose to the end of the new one 5) pull it through. It helps if you get the the two hoses inline as opposed to overlapping so try sticking something metal like a gear cable a few cm down each end prior to taping them together. If they separate, it'll be string+hoover time. No big deal.

Be VERY careful when cutting the hoses; the cuts have to be perpendular with clean holes... the tiniest amount of crap or restriction will stop the brakes working properly. You can do it with a Stanley knife if you're super careful and the blade is new. Make sure you get the olives and the interts too and make sure they are the right ones for your hose dimensions... And make sure the hose is the right one for your callipers and levers.

Good luck!

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part_robot [304 posts] 5 months ago
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I suspect another way of doing it would be to 1) with the crankset removed, remove the hose and the cable tie and put in a new cable tie completely loose 2) remove the little cable tie plug 3)  with the bike upside down and downtube parallel to the floor - thread something like a brake inner through the headset end and along the downtube until you can see it through the cable tie port 4) hook the tie around it with the plug  5) keep threading the now-captive inner down to the bottom bracket 6) pull the inner out of the bottom bracket and tape some thread to it 7) push it back in and keep pushing until it's near the rear brake 8) put a vacuum hose on the rear exit and suck through the thread 9) pull the inner through 10) attach the hose to the inner 11) pull all the way through. The framesets (if you buy the frameset on its own) come like this; you attach the hoses to pre-inserted brake cable inners and pull through.

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StraelGuy [1398 posts] 5 months ago
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You can buy a small plastic tool for cutting the hose that guarantees a clean, 90 degree cut. Just Google bike hose cutting tool and you'll find it.

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part_robot [304 posts] 5 months ago
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Yep. And I thoroughly recommend it versus doing it yourself with a knife!

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Canyon48 [930 posts] 5 months ago
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part_robot wrote:

It's straightforward if you're willing to sacrifice the cable tie (and deal with the swearing and anger that follows trying fit a new one). 1) remove the rubber bits that go into the frame 2) release the old hose at both ends 3) very throughly clean all the oil off the outside or you won't be able to 4) tape the end of the old hose to the end of the new one 5) pull it through. It helps if you get the the two hoses inline as opposed to overlapping so try sticking something metal like a gear cable a few cm down each end prior to taping them together. If they separate, it'll be string+hoover time. No big deal.

Be VERY careful when cutting the hoses; the cuts have to be perpendular with clean holes... the tiniest amount of crap or restriction will stop the brakes working properly. You can do it with a Stanley knife if you're super careful and the blade is new. Make sure you get the olives and the interts too and make sure they are the right ones for your hose dimensions... And make sure the hose is the right one for your callipers and levers.

Good luck!

Ah nice one!

At what point should the cable tie be removed though, or is it unnecessary to remove the cable tie if you use this method? If the new hose is connected to the old hose, I assume it will thread through the cable tie fine?

If the cable tie is taken out, hows is it taken out and how the heck do you fit a new one!?

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jacknorell [996 posts] 5 months ago
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Jagwire makes hose cutting tools that are very good. Its barb insertion tool is also highly recommended.

Shimano makes a tool to do both but it's £100. The Jagwire tools together are about £30.

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part_robot [304 posts] 5 months ago
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wellsprop wrote:

At what point should the cable tie be removed though, or is it unnecessary to remove the cable tie if you use this method?

It'll be hard to remove the cable tie without removing the hose anyway... 

wellsprop wrote:

If the new hose is connected to the old hose, I assume it will thread through the cable tie fine?

I doubt it. If the cable tie is done up tight, I don't think you'll manage to thread it through; it'll probably require a fair amount of effort anyway.

wellsprop wrote:

If the cable tie is taken out, hows is it taken out and how the heck do you fit a new one!?

See my second post. If I understand correctly what I saw when building the bike the cable tie sits in a little removable plastic housing. Once you've removed the host you can pull it out. You'd then cut the old tie off, put in a new one (with a lot of slack because you're going to have to thread the hose through it in the dark!) and then follow my instructions to get the hose through that hoop. It's definitely doable. And do keep in mind brake hose is pretty stiff so you do have a degree of control over it as you poke it down the inside of the frame. There's quite a few ways of doing it really... just remember that if it all goes pear shaped you can also suck a guide thread trough the holes...

Have you checked with Canyon though? Because they tend to have useful posts on this sort of thing hidden around their site. They might be able to put you in the right directly.

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part_robot [304 posts] 5 months ago
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jacknorell wrote:

Jagwire makes hose cutting tools that are very good. Its barb insertion tool is also highly recommended. Shimano makes a tool to do both but it's £100. The Jagwire tools together are about £30.

Yes, use this. Don't do what I did and whack it in with a hammer  7

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Canyon48 [930 posts] 5 months ago
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part_robot wrote:
jacknorell wrote:

Jagwire makes hose cutting tools that are very good. Its barb insertion tool is also highly recommended. Shimano makes a tool to do both but it's £100. The Jagwire tools together are about £30.

Yes, use this. Don't do what I did and whack it in with a hammer  7

That was what I did when I set up my wessex!

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Canyon48 [930 posts] 5 months ago
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@Part_robot, do you know if the hose is meant to sit above or below the BB. My other half's endurace frameset arrived and before we get the BB put in, need to work out where the hose guide should go!

Thanks for the fairly comprehensive explanation of the cable routing too  1

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Pilot Pete [53 posts] 5 months ago
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Use a gear cable inner taped tightly to your old hose. Pull the hose out, which puts the gear cable inner in the correct path inside the frame. Attach your new hose to the cable inner after removing the old one and pull it back the other way. As for the cable tie in the middle, do as suggested above if you can, or alternatively wrap a piece of foam packing around the hose (through the bottom bracket opening), secure it with a couple of cable ties pulled up tight and pull the hose through to the correct position with the foam packing in the down tube to prevent noise.

I have just done this on my new build - only difference was I didn’t have an old hose to pull out! I did similar with the di2 cables and junction box in the frame - wrapped and cable tied before being pushed up into the frame to prevent rattling.

Hope this helps.

PP

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Canyon48 [930 posts] 4 months ago
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Thanks for the help chaps  1

Turned out to be much easier than I thought it would be (after I'd spent an hour trying to work out how to do it properly.

Long story short, the best way was;

  1. Thread a guide through the old brakes house
  2. Remove old brake hose
  3. Put a new cable tie around the guide and remove old cable tie
  4. Remove gear cable bb plate covering thing
  5. Thread the new hose over the guide (from front to back) down the down tube
  6. Guide the brake hose out the bottom of the frame then send it on it's way to through the chainstay.

It took me ages to figure out that was the best way, but once I did it that way, it was done in a few mins.

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part_robot [304 posts] 4 months ago
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Great to hear and thanks for reporting back  1