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Hi

I'm in the market for new bike and wanted peoples experience/advice on the following bikes (and the manufacturers delivery/support/warranty).

Canyon Ultimate CF SL 8.0 Disc

Trek Emonda SL 6 Disc

Cannondale Synapse Disc Ultegra

Cervelo C5

* I am looking at the 2018 models because they have the updated Ultegra groupsets.

 

I was then planning on upgrading the wheels as none of these have very good stock wheels. I did look at spending more on the bike, to get better wheels, but an extra 1K on the bike still doesnt improve the wheel packages.

 

Thanks for your advice

16 comments

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Canyon48 [987 posts] 8 months ago
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I have the Ultimate CF SLX Disc 8.0 (which I have since upgraded to the new Ultegra and smaller disc brake rotors). It's awesome. The Mavic tyres it came with weren't great, I'd intended to put some GP4000s on anyway (which are very good). If I was being really critical, I'd probably say the Mavic Cosmic Pro Carbon Discs are a little heavy and it's a shame they aren't full carbon.

From order to delivery was 4 working days. Support has been very good, communication via email. Canyon also has a presence here and they are very helpful.

Where Trek, Cannondale and Cervelo have the upper hand is the fact you are able to test them. I haven't ridden any of those three so I can't comment, however, I know that Trek makes some VERY light disc brake bikes. Canyon is much better value, you can expect to pay between £500 and £1000 less for the equivalent spec.

If you're parting with £2-3k, you should expect a full bike fit and help sizing the bike from your LBS. I'd also expect a bit of a discount on saddle/bar tape/tyres etc.

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Beecho [367 posts] 8 months ago
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There are many here who’ll know so much more than me, but my first question is what do you want the bike for/to do? Disc brakes are a contentious issue and personally I think they’re overrated on road bikes. (When I were a lad, etc etc).

If you can expand on your usage you’ll get the best advice.

Kind regards,

Montgomery Burns

 

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Canyon48 [987 posts] 8 months ago
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Oh no, not the old disc brake rim brake argument!

Beecho is right, it totally depends on what you want the bike to do. I'll weigh in on my experience with my Ultimate CF SLX Disc...

My Canyon is basically my summer bike and I usually use it for rides around  1.5 to 2 hours, absolutely hammering it at about 20mph - It's very good at that. As I don't ride it in the anything other than good weather, I don't need disc brakes.

However, I have found that disc brakes give me a hell of a lot more confidence when descending (particularly good when I was dropping down Burrington Combe at a bit over 40mph, rounded a corner and there was a goat with its kids in the middle of the road). Disc brakes also have the added benefit of not wearing away carbon rims in the long run (and they perform way better than rim brakes on carbon wheels).

If you are going to use the bike all year round, I think discs are a must, having spent a few years riding rim brakes all year round - that said, there are some pretty good rim brake pads for wet weather.

I have found that my Canyon isn't ideal for slower rides 17-18mph (particularly over longer distances 50+ miles) as I always find myself switching between the big and little rings. But I use my Whyte Wessex for more relaxed rides anyway.

The Trek seems a little porky at 8.05kg.

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banksy [17 posts] 8 months ago
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Thanks for your replies. Here's some more info;

 

This bike will be my sole bike that'll be ridden all year round, all weather. That’s the main reason for discs, I've had a few close calls with rim brakes not stopping me quick enough when wet and also don't want to wear our expensive wheels.

 

As for usage, it'll some shorter rides at 20-24 mph average. Then some longer slower (16-18mph) rides and sportives up to 100 miles. Usually around 3-4 rides per week. But no commuting on it.

 

Canyon - Yes the large chainset is not perfect for me, my local area has short sharp escarpments to climb and I think I’d rather a compact, or semi-compact.

Trek - I was hoping to reduce the weight a bit with a set of decent wheels on it.

Cervelo - Looks like a nice frame, can’t find a weight for bike though, plus a threaded BB, which I like.

 

I do have a LBS that solely sells Trek so that’s makes it good to try out and get any discounts/freebies on accessories.

 

As I said, none seem to have decent wheels so I was going to upgrade those, once I have the bike.

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CanyonChloe [12 posts] 8 months ago
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Hi Banksy,

It's Chloe here from Canyon UK!

Thanks for your interest in the Ultimate CF SL Disc 8.0. This is a great bike with an impressive spec for the price. The SL is one of our top end carbon frames, it's not as stiff or as light as the SLX but comfort isn't compromised.

You will also be getting the latest Ultegra groupset with this bike.

Regarding the DT Swiss PR 1600 Spline wheels, this is a mid-range wheelset. They are reliable, easily servicable and stiff and responsive to use. If you were thinking of changing the wheelset you could alway sell the wheels that come with the bike and get the ones you had your eye on!

Unfortunately it's not possible to upgrade the components on our bikes but this in turn allows us to offer exceptional value for money and a quick production and shipping process.

All bikes ordered from stock are shipped within 10 days and then once it reaches the UK will be delivered within 2-3 days. We also have a UK Service Centre in Chessington where we have a Customer Service team, as well as a Service and Warranty department. We are more than happy to help you with any questions or queries you may have and if you ever needed to send your bike back for a service or order spare parts we will take care of that for you.

Whilst we don't have a test facility in the UK we do run various demo days and events throughout the year where you can test ride the bikes. The 2018 events list is just being finalised and details of the upcoming events will be posted to the Canyon UK Facebook page.

It's also useful to note that we have a 30 day return or exchange policy as well as a 30 day stem and bar exchange as we understand it can sometimes be difficult to get the sizing right if you can't sit on the bike first!

If you need any further help or have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us via the live chat on our website. Our test reports part of the website is also really useful to read some unbiased reviews like the one below:

https://www.canyon.com/en-gb/service/testreports/article.html?id=1124

Hopefully you become part of the Canyon family very soon!  1

Thanks,

CanyonChloe

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Simon E [3330 posts] 8 months ago
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They are all going to be truly great bikes. Weight differences will be insignificant, a few hundred grammes is far less relevant than finding a bike that fits you and that feels and looks right. I'd not suggest one over another as your idea of what constitutes 'best' is unlikely to match mine or that of another contributor.

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Canyon48 [987 posts] 8 months ago
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banksy wrote:

Thanks for your replies. Here's some more info;

 

This bike will be my sole bike that'll be ridden all year round, all weather. That’s the main reason for discs, I've had a few close calls with rim brakes not stopping me quick enough when wet and also don't want to wear our expensive wheels.

 

As for usage, it'll some shorter rides at 20-24 mph average. Then some longer slower (16-18mph) rides and sportives up to 100 miles. Usually around 3-4 rides per week. But no commuting on it.

 

Canyon - Yes the large chainset is not perfect for me, my local area has short sharp escarpments to climb and I think I’d rather a compact, or semi-compact.

Trek - I was hoping to reduce the weight a bit with a set of decent wheels on it.

Cervelo - Looks like a nice frame, can’t find a weight for bike though, plus a threaded BB, which I like.

 

I do have a LBS that solely sells Trek so that’s makes it good to try out and get any discounts/freebies on accessories.

 

As I said, none seem to have decent wheels so I was going to upgrade those, once I have the bike.

You're riding sounds similar to mine then (aside commuting). 

The Canyon has a semi-compact 52/36 - great for the short fast rides, but not so on longer rides, for which I'd choose a 50/34.

If you want mudguards I think the Trek Domane has hidden mudguard mounts too, it's worth considering the Orbea Avant M20 Team D aswell. Both of these are more endurance though, so you'd lose a bit of speed over a Canyon Ultimate, or the likes.

+1 for threaded BB's my Wessex has a threaded BB and it makes maintenance much easier. Mentioning it, you might also wish to consider the Whyte Wessex, it's billed as an all-year-round UK road bike - and it's pretty damn good at it too.

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risoto [72 posts] 8 months ago
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I would chose a semi compact, 52/39 with a 11-32 in the back. I find it rather irritating riding my compact bike when I am in the small ring, 34t, and always end up on the two smalles sprockets until I realize I better change to the big ring.

I wanted a Canyon last year but the model was sold out so I got a Rose bike instead. Also German, direct sales and on those you can customize your set-up. They are top quality. Best bike I've owned. But my next summer bike will be a Canyon, mainly because they look great and are great value also. I hate that most brands don't give you the full group set and put on rubbish saddles.

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banksy [17 posts] 7 months ago
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I had looked at the Orbea Avant M20 and the Whyte Wessex too. Both look nice winter bikes. I just think as I'd be riding them in the summer too, that I would have liked something slightly lighter.

I dont like it when manufacturers swap parts of a full groupset like Cannondale and Boardman (and others) swap chainset or cassette etc. with own brand.

Scott Addict 10 Disc and BMC RoadMachine 02 Two were others I had considered too.

What are peoples views on the stock wheels that come on this price range of bikes (approx £2500)?

 

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Canyon48 [987 posts] 7 months ago
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banksy wrote:

 

I had looked at the Orbea Avant M20 and the Whyte Wessex too. Both look nice winter bikes. I just think as I'd be riding them in the summer too, that I would have liked something slightly lighter.

I dont like it when manufacturers swap parts of a full groupset like Cannondale and Boardman (and others) swap chainset or cassette etc. with own brand.

Scott Addict 10 Disc and BMC RoadMachine 02 Two were others I had considered too.

What are peoples views on the stock wheels that come on this price range of bikes (approx £2500)?

 

Ditto your comment on the weight. My Wessex is reasonably porky at 9.5kg (in its full commuter setup) - then mudguards add another 500g.

Disc brake wheels are a bit of a pain tbh. You basically have to choose between fairly light (1600ish grams) but shallow rims, or fairly hefty (1750ish grams) but aero.

A Canyon at that price would come specced with DT Swiss PR1600 DB's, fairly light and shallow. Personally, I'd avoid anything "in-house" and/or 6bolt.

The roadmachine has Novatec 30 SL wheels. My other half has Novatec wheels on her bike and they are amazingly light. The bearings are also utterly atrocious and all needed relacing in a matter of months due to being really cheap. The spokes, nipples and rims also get damaged quite easy (owing to their lightness). I don't think the 30 SL wheels are as light however.

The syncros disc wheels on the Scott don't seem amazing either... This isn't necessarily a problem though ou can upgrade in the future.

I changed my Wessex's stock wheel for DT Swiss R32 Spline DB's (got them in the sale because they were end of stock), they aren't what I'd call light at a little over 1700 grams, but what they have in a bit of excess weight they more than make up for in aerodynamics (compared to shallow rims).

If you ask me, the Canyon Ultimate CF SL Disc 8.0 is by far the best of all the bikes you've mentioned. Full Ultegra R8020 and DT Swiss wheels and only 7.5kg for your £2549.

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banksy [17 posts] 7 months ago
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Thanks for the advice. Like you wellsprop, I think I'm leaning towards the Canyon...

 

 

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Canyon48 [987 posts] 7 months ago
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banksy wrote:

 

Thanks for the advice. Like you wellsprop, I think I'm leaning towards the Canyon...

 

 

No worries! I'm trying to be as impartial as possible (I already own a Canyon you see  3 ), but in terms of spec and value, Canyon is pretty much the best you can get.

Providing you are reasonably competent with an allen key, you'll have no issues putting a Canyon together either.

You do lose any bike fitting service, however.

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hawkinspeter [1979 posts] 7 months ago
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@wellsprop - I can recommend the Prime RP50 wheels:

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/prime-rp-50-carbon-clincher-disc-road-wheelset/rp-prod142951

Claimed weight of 1560g at a price of £703.99 and ships as tubeless compatible.

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banksy [17 posts] 7 months ago
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Okay, I'll open one more can of worms..

The only other difference between the Canyon and all the  others I have talked about - That's the crankset? Is there much difference riding between the compact (50-34) and semi-compact (52/36) assuming same cassette? 

Canyon supplies the semi-compact and all the others come with a compact crankset. As my local rides are mostly short but steap climbs, I am wondering if i will end up pushing some nice carbon up a climb I sued to ride on my old bike (compact (50-34)with 11-30 cassette).

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Canyon48 [987 posts] 7 months ago
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banksy wrote:

 

Okay, I'll open one more can of worms..

The only other difference between the Canyon and all the  others I have talked about - That's the crankset? Is there much difference riding between the compact (50-34) and semi-compact (52/36) assuming same cassette? 

Canyon supplies the semi-compact and all the others come with a compact crankset. As my local rides are mostly short but steap climbs, I am wondering if i will end up pushing some nice carbon up a climb I sued to ride on my old bike (compact (50-34)with 11-30 cassette).

YES! Pretty sizeable difference - at least, in my opinion.

I have absolutely no issues smashing my Canyon around using a 52/36 with an 11-28. Most the time I'm cycling pretty close to my limit and usually only for about 2 hours, so I have no issues hammering it - 36 28 is fine even on the steepest bit of Cheddar Gorge for me.

If I'm commuting/taking it a bit easier, I'd find a 52/36 less than ideal for any hills where I want to take it a bit slower. You could always change the rear mech and cassette (you also have the option of an 11-34 with the new R8000).

 

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alansmurphy [1824 posts] 7 months ago
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The derailleur should take an 11-34 but be careful with the jumps, to be fair I'm running it on an 8 speed Claris but the jump between the 34 and the next sprocket is horrible!