Home

 

Hi all

 

I'm a noob here but not a noob to cycling.....have owned many bikes over the years and am a fairly competent mechanic.

 

The problem i've encountered has come with a new set of wheels on which it would appear that the end caps have not been tightened, this has resulted in the drive side end cap (rear wheel) protruding further than it would normally, in turn this has caused frame rub (down to the carbon but not through it) to my relatively new frame....when I realised what has caused this, I figured I could tighten it by hand and could see the clearance improve......

 

I've since sent the wheel back to the manufactuer and they are arguing that i've not tightened the QR and the end cap has loosened itself from there. and that it's not possible that the wheel was sent without the end cap being tightened......

 

I've not had to make any adjustments with the indexing(which does sound odd, but I can adjust the end cap in and out but still don't have to), i did however have to resit the disc brake calipers.

 

 

Advice please......Do I go small claims court??

 

 

thanks

15 comments

Avatar
Flying Scot [1005 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

What do you mean by end cap?

The bearing outer dust seal has worked loose?,

 

Im struggling to imagine this, its loose and was still rotating with the cassette, as wouldn't it be behind the cassettes locknut on the drive side?

 

Avatar
SteveAustin [76 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

end cap? nothing on the axle, including nuts, rotates so i dont think you mean this. the only thing thats near the frame that does rotate is the lock nut on the cassette, or the cassette itself, and if these were grinding the frame, then i dont think you have much of a chance of successfully claiming the wheelmaker is at fault.

 

have you got a pic of the "end cap"

Avatar
Beatnik69 [398 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Is it the plastic covered nut that screws on to the end of the skewer (other end from the QR lever)?

Avatar
dottigirl [808 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
SteveAustin wrote:

have you got a pic of the "end cap"

Yeah, pics would help.

 

Avatar
mike the bike [980 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

 

If you are referring to the non-lever end of the quick-release I reckon you are up a gumtree mate.  Adjusting the QR before tightening would be your responsibility, it's part of the procedure.  

Many wheels come with a warning about correct use of the QR, I know my latest DT Swiss certainly did.  It might help your case if yours didn't?

Best of luck.

Avatar
Welsh boy [430 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Dont bite folks, it is obviously a wind-up.

Avatar
b2theb [2 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Not  a wind up!!!!  please see attached images.....

Avatar
b2theb [2 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

end cap out

Avatar
matthewn5 [1080 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

If these are recent high-end Shimano hubs, the end cap is fixed on the right, threaded on the left, like a Record hub. It's impossible to unthread by hand.

//img2.brain4.photobox.com/93528982d7312f171094ef87ac4fefeaffdcd5b84f2e6a33ef5b76a535d333af4d8e13fe.jpg)

How did you fit the wheels in the rear triangle given the axle was too long? Did you have to spring the drop-outs apart to get it in there?

It's a very strange issue!

Avatar
sergius [470 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

That looks like you did something similar to me (without the damage at least!), I bought some new wheels with a 142mm TA when I actually needed a 135mm.

 

With the 142 the axle protruded more out from the cassette as per your picture, I could just about spring the dropouts out enough to get the 142 in - but it clearly wasn't right.

When I realised I had bought the wrong thing I then ordered the 135mm version instead - which looked a lot more like your first picture; and actually fit into the frame!

Avatar
hawkinspeter [1119 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Small claims court is always worth a try although my first guess is that the bearings weren't adjusted sufficiently when fitting the wheel. Usually wheels are delivered with the bearings tightened and ready to go.

That looks to me like the bearings would have been incredibly loose. Was the wheel a bit 'wobbly' when not on the bike?

Avatar
SteveAustin [76 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

so, if the wheel nuts had been tightened and everything right; the cassette/locknut shouldnt have hit the frame, ever.

but then even if the the axlenuts were not tight the cassette/locknut shouldnt have hit the frame either, as the distance between frame-cassette wouldn't be any closer. unless, the axle spacing was all wrong.

 

 

Avatar
matthewn5 [1080 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
SteveAustin wrote:

so, if the wheel nuts had been tightened and everything right; the cassette/locknut shouldnt have hit the frame, ever.

but then even if the the axlenuts were not tight the cassette/locknut shouldnt have hit the frame either, as the distance between frame-cassette wouldn't be any closer. unless, the axle spacing was all wrong.

I'd taken the OP to mean that the tyre had worn the frame... might be wrong.

Avatar
Flying Scot [1005 posts] 1 month ago
1 like
matthewn5 wrote:
SteveAustin wrote:

so, if the wheel nuts had been tightened and everything right; the cassette/locknut shouldnt have hit the frame, ever.

but then even if the the axlenuts were not tight the cassette/locknut shouldnt have hit the frame either, as the distance between frame-cassette wouldn't be any closer. unless, the axle spacing was all wrong.

I'd taken the OP to mean that the tyre had worn the frame... might be wrong.

 

That would make more sense, that the wheel was moving about on the axle and rubbing away at the stays.

Avatar
madcarew [465 posts] 1 month ago
1 like

The description is certainly a little confusing. Pictures of frame damage? It seems like very loose cones is the most likely answer, in which case, although the wheel manufacturer may have sent it out like that, it would be down to the cyclist to stop when they notice the wheel rubbing on the frame.