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How are they? Just like a Mars Bar? I recently saw one costing £3.29 at a cycling fare; and I understand you can get them cheaper and can probably order a box online for much cheaper, but the unit price is still eyewatering for what we humans call 'food.' If I am on the bike already how much protein do I really need during a ride, and if I am off the bike why not have a juicy steak dinner? I've seen Pros necking tiny cans of Coke on the go for sugar, but who is muscle building? I can't see how these are effective or economic for anyone. Have you bought one?

I could get a kilo of whey powder for that. It is bad enough that Mars Bars in shops have shrunk so much they are now like the old fun sized minis (I used to string out until February 1986.)

 

30 comments

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barongreenback [114 posts] 4 months ago
9 likes

It’s bollocks. Unadulterated marketing king sized hairy sweaty testicles.   Most people consume plenty of protein in their regular diet. 

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wycombewheeler [1246 posts] 4 months ago
6 likes

+1 for steak dinner over protein bars.

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madcarew [480 posts] 4 months ago
5 likes

A mars bar protein is simply junk food. You will not need or use protein whilst exercising (Very very few animals, Husky dogs being one, can rebuild muscle at the same time as using it). For food on the go eat something that's not high in simple sugars, that has a modicum of fat, and is largely complex carbs. Like a banana, or a cheese sandwich, or a flap jack, or some rice cake, or som e other real food.

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theironduck [92 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

I picked one up at a motorway services - it was a couple of quid from memory - on the drive up to RideLondon.  I kept it in the car for after the event.  A chocolate bar is obviously more convenient to keep in the car than  a home-made protein shake so it was handy from that perspective.  Taste-wise it was Mars-like but  a lot chewier.  It wasn't the worst thing I've eaten but I won't be eating them for pleasure that's for sure.  Nor would I eat one on a ride, but I'm not sure that's what they're for tbh.

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simonmb [571 posts] 4 months ago
3 likes

The day the Mars and Snickers brands became 'gym snacks' I knew the lunatics had finally taken over the asylum. 100g of chicken or quinoa give the same amount of protein and with the bonus of a wealth of other unprocessed nutrients. But then you guys already know that...

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wellsprop [626 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

BS.

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LastBoyScout [363 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

Yeah - out of interest, I bought the Mars one and the Snickers one for about 50p each from a bargain bin at a tiny convenience store, of all places.

As someone else said, much chewier version of the originals, but nothing special otherwise - won't bother again.

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StraelGuy [1110 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

I saw a documentary on Netflix recently and apparently protein's all the rage at the moment - think 'idiots aimlessly eating protein all the time while simultaneously doing no exercise and expecting to to miraculously turn into beefcakes'.

 

I can only think that these brands are jumping on the bandwagon and profiting by people's general daftness!

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andyp [1549 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

Agree with you on the whole - it's just another line of marketing bolox.

 

But this:

 

Q: 'who is muscle building?'

 

A: All of us.

 

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Simon E [3180 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

You don't  need Mars bars and you don't need whey powder.

Eat real food.

Having said that, I have to admit that I do enjoy eating a Snickers during a long ride but I would not want or need a 'protein' version.

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davel [2055 posts] 4 months ago
2 likes
Simon E wrote:

You don't  need Mars bars and you don't need whey powder.

Eat real food.

Having said that, I have to admit that I do enjoy eating a Snickers during a long ride but I would not want or need a 'protein' version.

Of course you don't need it, but it's dead convenient. I use protein drinks on fasted rides, and my long rides, to stave off hunger. These protein snacks and powders etc can have a place.

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Leviathan [2905 posts] 4 months ago
3 likes

So a general waste of time, trust your inner McDuck. I am surprised with the empassioned responses though.

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davel [2055 posts] 4 months ago
3 likes

Well, this probably is an expensive, overchewy, shit version of a Mars bar.

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jollygoodvelo [1685 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

Small packet of prosciutto after a ride.  Almost 100% protein apart from a bit of fat and salt.   Perfect.

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madcarew [480 posts] 4 months ago
1 like
davel wrote:
Simon E wrote:

You don't  need Mars bars and you don't need whey powder.

Eat real food.

Having said that, I have to admit that I do enjoy eating a Snickers during a long ride but I would not want or need a 'protein' version.

Of course you don't need it, but it's dead convenient. I use protein drinks on fasted rides, and my long rides, to stave off hunger. These protein snacks and powders etc can have a place.

Slightly confused; if you're using a protein drink on (or before) a fasted ride, it's not a fasted ride....

And protein snacks and powders can have a place, but it's one that is better filled and taken by real food.

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Al__S [1278 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

I've seen that Weetabix are now on the protein bandwagon too.

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davel [2055 posts] 4 months ago
1 like
madcarew wrote:
davel wrote:
Simon E wrote:

You don't  need Mars bars and you don't need whey powder.

Eat real food.

Having said that, I have to admit that I do enjoy eating a Snickers during a long ride but I would not want or need a 'protein' version.

Of course you don't need it, but it's dead convenient. I use protein drinks on fasted rides, and my long rides, to stave off hunger. These protein snacks and powders etc can have a place.

Slightly confused; if you're using a protein drink on (or before) a fasted ride, it's not a fasted ride....

And protein snacks and powders can have a place, but it's one that is better filled and taken by real food.

Most of the time I neck it when I get to work, but according to the British Cycling 'science' (to be fair, most of the sciencey stuff I've read lately appears to support it) you still get the fasted ride benefits if you take a protein drink on it. Follow this link, but prepare to increase your confusion... https://www.britishcycling.org.uk/knowledge/nutrition/article/izn2015081...

But enough of the Real Food FTW!!! bollocks comments that accompany these articles. One word, and one word only, matters here, and that word is confuckingvenience.

I tend not to carry a roast lunch with me on a 6 hour trek into the North Wales hills, and I tend not to have a full breakfast laid out when I get into work. To bang on about 'real food' here is missing the point.

Avatar
Simon E [3180 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes
davel wrote:

One word, and one word only, matters here, and that word is confuckingvenience.

I tend not to carry a roast lunch with me on a 6 hour trek into the North Wales hills, and I tend not to have a full breakfast laid out when I get into work. To bang on about 'real food' here is missing the point.

Is this all a bit tongue-in-cheek or have we hit a nerve?

I don't see anything inconvenient about carrying a flapjack or a sarnie, a couple of bananas or even stopping at a <cough> 'convenience' store to buy a snack.

Most of us get more than adequate protein in a normal, healthy diet. People walked and cycled just as far before powdered energy and protein products were marketed as substitutes for normal food. OTOH if  powdered protein works for you then go ahead, no-one will mind.

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davel [2055 posts] 4 months ago
1 like
Simon E wrote:
davel wrote:

One word, and one word only, matters here, and that word is confuckingvenience.

I tend not to carry a roast lunch with me on a 6 hour trek into the North Wales hills, and I tend not to have a full breakfast laid out when I get into work. To bang on about 'real food' here is missing the point.

Is this all a bit tongue-in-cheek or have we hit a nerve?

I don't see anything inconvenient about carrying a flapjack or a sarnie, a couple of bananas or even stopping at a <cough> 'convenience' store to buy a snack.

Most of us get more than adequate protein in a normal, healthy diet. People walked and cycled just as far before powdered energy and protein products were marketed as substitutes for normal food. OTOH if  powdered protein works for you then go ahead, no-one will mind.

No nerve hit, sweetie, but it isn't all tongue-in-cheek either. I'm just calling out your blinkered generalisation for the bullshit it is. It might occur to you that it is *just*possible that some people prefer to pack a couple of bottles over digging out a soggy sarnie from their back pocket or stopping at the first convenience store 'cough' Spar 'cough' that you might find, in the middle of nowhere, park your bike somewhere that you hope the locals won't nick it from, and then realise that what passes for 'real food' is a packaged pastie. But hey, if you want to consider shit pastry wrapped round ringpiece and cartilage 'real food' then go ahead, no-one will mind.

And sure, most people get enough protein from their diets. But most people are lazy bastards who consider walking to their car 'exercise' and eat too much anyway.

Also.... Events. I've done half/full irons where the vast majority of food and drink is High 5 stuff and the like. If you haven't got used to that as part of your training, it's welcome to shitsville, or bonkville, or both. I'm yet to see any portable kitchens in T1.

Spouting about real food on a post about a protein bar is as relevant as posting a review on Gaucho that says 'nice steaks, but I struggled to squeeze my meal into my back pocket'.

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Dr_Lex [466 posts] 4 months ago
2 likes

Can I look forward to Wiggle switching out haribo to mini pepperami in my deliveries?

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macrophotofly [298 posts] 4 months ago
1 like

Whilst davel might have got a I little excited in his latest reply, I do agree.

I go to the gym at work late in the afternoon. My work doesn't have refridgerators or food preparation facilites (just tea/coffee making) and the canteen shuts at 2pm. After the gym I appreciate something to eat as I won't have tea for another 3 hours and I would like something to help with the recovery. My usual choices are a Clif Builder's bar or SIS whey 20. A box of either can be safely stored in my desk drawer without deteriorating. They are convenient and after doing 700-1000 calouries of workout, giving myself a reward of 88-250 calories, staving off hunger, plus a protein boost is not bad. Yes the Protein Mars is a marketing scam, but I know they are in vending machine here and if I had run out of my preferred choices then I would take one over a normal chocolate bar  as my after exercise snack.

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hawkinspeter [1212 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

My favourite energy booster is the Nature Valley Protein bars. They're a lot cheaper, gluten free and don't melt in your back pocket (unless you go for the chocolate variety).

https://www.tesco.com/groceries/en-GB/products/293837316?sc_cmp=ppc*GHS%20-%20Grocery%20-%20New*PX%20%7C%20Shopping%20GSC%20%7C%20Top%20Offers*PRODUCT%20GROUP293837316*&gclid=CjwKCAjwxo3OBRBpEiwAS7X62VpVLc2f_aFcxkfEhxowWJYctRmmLKneYaIatXOWs-QVkzSA2oe20hoCvCwQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

Currently £1.44 for 4 x 40g bars.

 

Avatar
madcarew [480 posts] 4 months ago
1 like
davel wrote:
madcarew wrote:
davel wrote:
Simon E wrote:

You don't  need Mars bars and you don't need whey powder.

Eat real food.

Having said that, I have to admit that I do enjoy eating a Snickers during a long ride but I would not want or need a 'protein' version.

Of course you don't need it, but it's dead convenient. I use protein drinks on fasted rides, and my long rides, to stave off hunger. These protein snacks and powders etc can have a place.

Slightly confused; if you're using a protein drink on (or before) a fasted ride, it's not a fasted ride....

And protein snacks and powders can have a place, but it's one that is better filled and taken by real food.

Most of the time I neck it when I get to work, but according to the British Cycling 'science' (to be fair, most of the sciencey stuff I've read lately appears to support it) you still get the fasted ride benefits if you take a protein drink on it. Follow this link, but prepare to increase your confusion... https://www.britishcycling.org.uk/knowledge/nutrition/article/izn2015081... But enough of the Real Food FTW!!! bollocks comments that accompany these articles. One word, and one word only, matters here, and that word is confuckingvenience. I tend not to carry a roast lunch with me on a 6 hour trek into the North Wales hills, and I tend not to have a full breakfast laid out when I get into work. To bang on about 'real food' here is missing the point.

Yep, I've done Iron man too. Real food: Meusli bars, flap jacks, banana. If you look in the aid stations on IM you'll notice crisps, and cheese sandwiches, and all sort sof other goodies.  Here's the point. A protein drink, or bar, is entirely unnecessary. Reference the British cycling article, to quote "if in a fully fasted  state": They don't go on to define "fully fasted" but by their implication it is amine depleted state as well. This means you haven't eaten protein at all in the previous 24 hours and (probably) have done vigorous exercise previous to the fast. If you are not amine depleted the protein will simply (as is most protein you ingest) be converted to energy via the citirc acid cyle so it's not really a fasted ride. Again, there is little point in taking on board protein during exercise except to provide immediate access to amino acides during the immediate post exercise recovery phase as the body is largely unable to utilise protein (amino acids) for muscle repair during exercise (unless you're a husky). Multiple studies have shown (see Stannard et al, meta study) which illuminates that unless your food contains WADA illegal substances there is no performance advantage available over normal food from any drink or other supplement. So, take your calories as complex carbs and fat, either in your drink or in food, during exercise (or proetin if you like) and you will gain all the performance benefits of any gel / superbar / protein shake etc etc. Convenience? If you want a mars bar, knock yourself out, but the fact that it is 'protein enriched' conveys no performance or fuelling advantage what so ever.

The only reason your 'protein drink' staves off hunger is because it is providing you with calories, ( a steak will produce an insulin peak similar to that of the same caloric value of rice) and because protein is somewhat slower to digest so provides those calories ( approx 20%) slower than the equivalent intake or carbs.

As for fasted riding, last weekend I did a 12 mile TTT (av  28 mph) followed by a 40 mile road race (av 26 mph) and the only thing I had to eat all day prior or during racing was 3 cups of coffee, a banana and a gel (for confuckingvenience). I do it, I get it, and I simply eat 'real food'. 

Avatar
madcarew [480 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

 

[/quote] No nerve hit, sweetie, but it isn't all tongue-in-cheek either. I'm just calling out your blinkered generalisation for the bullshit it is. ...And sure, most people get enough protein from their diets. ...Spouting about real food on a post about a protein bar is as relevant as posting a review on Gaucho that says 'nice steaks, but I struggled to squeeze my meal into my back pocket'.[/quote]

Your blinkered view is that somehow a protein shake or bar is better / more conveninet / more appropriate than a meusli bar / banana / flap jack etc. It isn't. The fact that it has protein in it is inconsefuckingquential (to coin a phrase). You have drunk the kool aid. You might dive for that protein mars bar instead of the standard mars bar, but there is not one whit of scientific evidence that it holds any gain or advantage over the standard mars bar at all. 

Most people get enough protein  way more protein than necessary from their standard diet, unless they are a body builder. (Most studies show that active, non -professional, endurance athletes  have entirely adequate protein intake at 1g / kg per day - maintenance level for sedentary male = .75g / kg / day)  The national average of protein intake is 1.1 g/ kg per day, so even as an ironman, the average person consumes more than adequate protein to supply their needs, without needing to resort to pulling soggy pastry and ringpiece out of their back pocket. BTW, as an ironman you develop very little muscle mass. Arguably your protein requirements are little higher than Joe couch-potato Smith of Acacia Grove, TV land. 

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barongreenback [114 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

I think you have to remember that most of us posting here are relatively well informed about nutrition and can take rational choices.  The protein Mars is aimed at a set of easily persuaded consumers who see PROTEIN and assume it must somehow be a healthier option.  It's a bit like when you see overweight people at the gym chugging back Lucozade sport during a half hour session on the elliptical rather than just having water.  Protein is the fasionable macronutrient of choice at the moment.

I work in London and there's a kiosk outside Canary Wharf underground station called 'Protein Haus'.  Their products aren't being sold to serious gym bunnies...

Avatar
davel [2055 posts] 4 months ago
1 like
madcarew wrote:
davel wrote:
madcarew wrote:
davel wrote:
Simon E wrote:

You don't  need Mars bars and you don't need whey powder.

Eat real food.

Having said that, I have to admit that I do enjoy eating a Snickers during a long ride but I would not want or need a 'protein' version.

Of course you don't need it, but it's dead convenient. I use protein drinks on fasted rides, and my long rides, to stave off hunger. These protein snacks and powders etc can have a place.

Slightly confused; if you're using a protein drink on (or before) a fasted ride, it's not a fasted ride....

And protein snacks and powders can have a place, but it's one that is better filled and taken by real food.

Most of the time I neck it when I get to work, but according to the British Cycling 'science' (to be fair, most of the sciencey stuff I've read lately appears to support it) you still get the fasted ride benefits if you take a protein drink on it. Follow this link, but prepare to increase your confusion... https://www.britishcycling.org.uk/knowledge/nutrition/article/izn2015081... But enough of the Real Food FTW!!! bollocks comments that accompany these articles. One word, and one word only, matters here, and that word is confuckingvenience. I tend not to carry a roast lunch with me on a 6 hour trek into the North Wales hills, and I tend not to have a full breakfast laid out when I get into work. To bang on about 'real food' here is missing the point.

Yep, I've done Iron man too. Real food: Meusli bars, flap jacks, banana. If you look in the aid stations on IM you'll notice crisps, and cheese sandwiches, and all sort sof other goodies.  Here's the point. A protein drink, or bar, is entirely unnecessary. Reference the British cycling article, to quote "if in a fully fasted  state": They don't go on to define "fully fasted" but by their implication it is amine depleted state as well. This means you haven't eaten protein at all in the previous 24 hours and (probably) have done vigorous exercise previous to the fast. If you are not amine depleted the protein will simply (as is most protein you ingest) be converted to energy via the citirc acid cyle so it's not really a fasted ride. Again, there is little point in taking on board protein during exercise except to provide immediate access to amino acides during the immediate post exercise recovery phase as the body is largely unable to utilise protein (amino acids) for muscle repair during exercise (unless you're a husky). Multiple studies have shown (see Stannard et al, meta study) which illuminates that unless your food contains WADA illegal substances there is no performance advantage available over normal food from any drink or other supplement. So, take your calories as complex carbs and fat, either in your drink or in food, during exercise (or proetin if you like) and you will gain all the performance benefits of any gel / superbar / protein shake etc etc. Convenience? If you want a mars bar, knock yourself out, but the fact that it is 'protein enriched' conveys no performance or fuelling advantage what so ever.

The only reason your 'protein drink' staves off hunger is because it is providing you with calories, ( a steak will produce an insulin peak similar to that of the same caloric value of rice) and because protein is somewhat slower to digest so provides those calories ( approx 20%) slower than the equivalent intake or carbs.

As for fasted riding, last weekend I did a 12 mile TTT (av  28 mph) followed by a 40 mile road race (av 26 mph) and the only thing I had to eat all day prior or during racing was 3 cups of coffee, a banana and a gel (for confuckingvenience). I do it, I get it, and I simply eat 'real food'. 

You're arguing points that I haven't even made... Most of that ramble is about eating protein during exercise. I don't give a shit about that particular point; the Mars bar referred to doesn't have a 'MUST BE EATEN DURING EXERCISE' note slapped on it. I'm not defending this particular product, but saying that the convenience of powders etc have their place. I do what works for me, and don't feel the need to brag to some randoms about averages (do put it away, love - it really isn't that impressive).

This is massively subjective and it isn't solely me getting my knickers in a knot. Flapjack and muesli bars are 'real food' now? Bullshit - you don't sit around eating them for main meals. We all make choices on the 'convenience' scale. My point, and it's really fucking obvious, is that whenever there's an article about any overpriced timesaver, or newfangled thing, the usual suspects fall over themselves to say 'you don't need ..... '. I believe the technical term is 'dickheads on the internet'. The 'real food' argument is spurious here, given that your own examples contain much of what I wouldn't call 'real food'.

Avatar
davel [2055 posts] 4 months ago
1 like
madcarew wrote:

 

davel wrote:

No nerve hit, sweetie, but it isn't all tongue-in-cheek either. I'm just calling out your blinkered generalisation for the bullshit it is. ...And sure, most people get enough protein from their diets. ...Spouting about real food on a post about a protein bar is as relevant as posting a review on Gaucho that says 'nice steaks, but I struggled to squeeze my meal into my back pocket'.

Your blinkered view is that somehow a protein shake or bar is better / more conveninet / more appropriate than a meusli bar / banana / flap jack etc. It isn't. The fact that it has protein in it is inconsefuckingquential (to coin a phrase). You have drunk the kool aid. You might dive for that protein mars bar instead of the standard mars bar, but there is not one whit of scientific evidence that it holds any gain or advantage over the standard mars bar at all. 

Most people get enough protein  way more protein than necessary from their standard diet, unless they are a body builder. (Most studies show that active, non -professional, endurance athletes  have entirely adequate protein intake at 1g / kg per day - maintenance level for sedentary male = .75g / kg / day)  The national average of protein intake is 1.1 g/ kg per day, so even as an ironman, the average person consumes more than adequate protein to supply their needs, without needing to resort to pulling soggy pastry and ringpiece out of their back pocket. BTW, as an ironman you develop very little muscle mass. Arguably your protein requirements are little higher than Joe couch-potato Smith of Acacia Grove, TV land. 

This will sound like I'm fat yes, but given my history in sprinting, boxing, rugby and swimming, I'm a bit lumpier than your average ironman. I do ok though... but better at half/ limpics.

Again, not defending this particular product, whose prime market has to be impressionable non-athletes. But I am defending convenient nutrition, and knocking the shit out of the usual preachers making the usual criticisms that don't even make sense ' you don't want that - you want real food - like, er, a muesli bar, or, er...  a load of oats welded together with butter and sugar, or, er....... a gel'. Banana - yep, agreed. Again, you're arguing points I'm not making - where have I defended the Mars Protein?

Or actual real food, like a 'steak dinner', or 'chicken and quinoa'. Great - I'll just squeeze a hob and pans into my saddlebag.

And it isn't about daily protein needs - it's how much protein you can process at a time (roughly 20g/hr off the top of my head), and how much is just a waste. I dare say a bodybuilder or athlete could put this silly bar to some use.

Also, stop breaking the quote tags.

Avatar
Simon E [3180 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes
davel wrote:

No nerve hit, sweetie, but it isn't all tongue-in-cheek either. I'm just calling out your blinkered generalisation for the bullshit it is.

Oh dear. I might have bothered to read the rest as I'm always ready to learn from people who know better than me and reconsider my PoV. I don't care how many hours/miles/bench presses or whatever you do, engaging condescending twat mode puts me right off.

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Leviathan [2905 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes

Wow, this thread is clogged with passive aggressive asshats; gonna turn my notifications off.

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SingleSpeed [401 posts] 4 months ago
0 likes
barongreenback wrote:

I work in London and there's a kiosk outside Canary Wharf underground station called 'Protein Haus'.  Their products aren't being sold to serious brain dead London wankers...

FTFY