Wheel very close to right side chain stay

by tommyketchup   August 18, 2010  

On my Cube LTD Comp when switching between slicks and nobbys, I have noticed that the nobby rear tyre is virtually rubbing against the right side chain stay, ie the one on the other side of the derailleur. The wheel itself isnt buckled or bent in any way, and I can only think that it was built like this.

When I am cycling uphill, being a rather large bloke, the bike sways from side to side, and I can hear the tyre rubbing on the right chain stay.

What can I do to fix this problem?

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Does the wheel need 'true'ing', and is it something I can do at home?

I go great with chips Tongue

posted by tommyketchup [84 posts]
18th August 2010 - 10:45

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the wheel might need dished over to the other side slightly.

also make sure you tyre is seated properly

posted by Lost faith in t... [119 posts]
18th August 2010 - 12:19

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What is dished? How do I check to see if the tyre is seated properly?

What do I need to get to "dish" the wheel?

Regards TK

I go great with chips Tongue

posted by tommyketchup [84 posts]
18th August 2010 - 16:46

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TommyK - due to the room that the cassette takes up on the rear wheel, the flanges that the spokes attach to are not symetrical either side of the centre line of the rear axle. This means that the spokes on the left (when viewed from the back of the bike) form a cone as they attach near the frame, but the spokes on the right are almost flat as they attach much nearer the centre line of the rear axle.

The spokes on the right are pulled tighter in order to draw the rim across to the right to make the rim sit in the centre. If this is not done correctly, the rim can be true (not buckled), but off centre, so sits closer to one or other chain stay.

This is a specialist job, so if it is under warranty, return it to where you bought it, or if not, go to your favoured LBS.

Complicating matters since 1965

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posted by DaSy [649 posts]
18th August 2010 - 19:00

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Tommy, number of points you can answer to help clear this up...

1.How much closer is it to the right than the left?
2.At the seat stays is it closer to the right than the left?
3.Flip the bike over, lokk down the length of the bike, does the rear wheel look to be off centre? (ignore how close it is to the chainstay)
4.Is the off-road rear tyre the original the bike came with?

You see sometimes bikes are designed with the driveside stay slightly different to the non-drive, this is to aid clearence to the chainset. If this is the case the above should tell you if the wheel is off or the frame is different as i described. It could be there just isnt clearence for that tyre at the chainstay or just enough for a slightly err, lighter, bloke to not flex the wheel like you do.

Of course as DaSy said, a decent bike shop should be able to take a glance at it for you and give you a quick suggestion as to a solution.

Rich.

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posted by STATO [418 posts]
19th August 2010 - 8:49

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Just had the exact same problem with a friends bike. Actual wheel was near perfectly true so no problem there.

Turned out there was a slight crack in the wheel axle which caused wheel to rub against chain stay. This got progressively worse until it snapped! Also wheel rubbed more when putting more pressure down.

If this is the peoblems its easy enough to sort out yourself or will not take lbs long.

posted by Jonty79 [29 posts]
19th August 2010 - 9:23

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Hi Rich,
I am not on the bike atm, so these are off the cuff answers.
1. I can get my index between wheel and left chain stay, and not even my pinky between wheel and right chain stay. So a difference of approx 7mm
2. I have never looked at the wheel that high up, so I can only answer this when I get home tonight
3. What does off center mean? As in does the rim hang over the hub, or is the rim to the right?
4. The nobby nic is the original tyre. It has been on and off the rim a few times, because I had moved to semi slicks when I use it to commute with.

It could be that I am a, err slighly larger then usual bloke, and the wheel does flex more under me then normal. However when the wheel is not under any strain, it is still sat far closer to the right chain stay.

I'll see if I can take a picture of it, so you guys can see what I am talking about. I wonder if I can post pics here?

I go great with chips Tongue

posted by tommyketchup [84 posts]
19th August 2010 - 10:53

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tommyketchup wrote:
Hi Rich,
3. What does off center mean? As in does the rim hang over the hub, or is the rim to the right?
Sorry, meant does the wheel look to be in the middle of the bike, ie. in line with the down tube and BB, or is it off to one side. Also, check that it sits inline with the frame, ie. not pointing off to one side which might mean the frame is bent.

Quote:

...However when the wheel is not under any strain, it is still sat far closer to the right chain stay.

I'll see if I can take a picture of it, so you guys can see what I am talking about. I wonder if I can post pics here?

As i said it could be that the bike is designed to be closer on one side, if its equal at the seat stays then this will be the case, if not then it could be a badly dished wheel.

EDIT: one other thing, take the wheel out and spin the axle, it might be bent or broken which could be casuing the issue.

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posted by STATO [418 posts]
20th August 2010 - 9:42

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