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Hi ya

Looking for fiest road bike with budjet of 650ish

have several models in mind

Trek 1.2 18 /27
Specialized Allez Sport 18/27
Orbea Aqua
Bianchi Via Naorone
Cube aerial
Giant Defy 3

wouyld appreciate recommendations hav eridden trek impreesse with it have ride lined up for specialized, cube & bianchi

14 comments

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funkystevey04 [3 posts] 6 years ago
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Hi,
what you want to do is ride all the bikes and see what feels best. Take in account of the different types of group sets and see what is best value for money.
For me style was big on the list and i liked the Bianchi, what type of group set comes with the one you are looking at?

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fourstringsisplenty [58 posts] 6 years ago
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A first road bike is normally a learning curve anyway; I'd say the most important thing is to go to a proper bike shop where they'll measure you up and fit you properly to the machine. You'll get a MUCH better ride that way than by chasing a higher-spec rear derailleur on one model over another. If they're willing to change things to get a good fit, that's fantastic, but even if you have to pay a little more to make alterations, it's still worthwhile.

That said, I think Specialized always punch above their weight. Even when the spec sheets say another bike ought to be better, Specialized machines normally feel more 'together'. I've had two now (with other bikes in between), and I think their build quality is very high and their customer service extremely good.

(I don't work for Specialized, by the way!)

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cactuscat [284 posts] 6 years ago
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I can vouch for mid range treks, I have a 1.5 and it's a good quality bike for the money. fourstrings is right though, a bike that fits beats one that doesn't any day of the week. seat tubes are what get measured, but it's the reach that'll most affect how the bike feels. If you can, get on a jig somewhere and get someone to measure you up.

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Ricardo [4 posts] 6 years ago
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thanks for info will have to try specialized as tried trek 1.2 which was impresive

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Zaskar [133 posts] 6 years ago
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Get a bike fit first.

Allez frame has potential for component upgrades.

Trek is nice but requires an upgrade of the whole bike rather than bits in the future-so if you plan to do upgrade once you've trained/hooked then go for the Trek.

Trek has eyelets for mudguards-winter trainer-will help it sell and it runs nine speed instead of the Allez.

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Ricardo [4 posts] 6 years ago
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thanks for this info looks as though i ned to go to Ecvans where they have spec & trek to compare each one & then look at Giant although I belive Trek & spec are better quality

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TheMelonMan [3 posts] 6 years ago
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Take a look at Ribble, great value road bikes, very good dimensions, full range of componentry from entry level upwards,and over the past years have been ridden by numerous champions - Chris Boardman, Chris Newton, Bradley Wiggins (according to his book, his first proper bike). Id take a £650 Ribble/PBK/DAve Hinde anyday over a trek, specialised etc as they are put together with thought, not just kitted out with inhouse components like Bontrager etc of questionable quality. My winter bike's a Ribble, just done its 2nd full winter, and for the £550 it cost me its an absolute steal.

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Jonty79 [26 posts] 6 years ago
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Ribble have great value bikes with good specs but delivery is often later than stated and customer service is very bad should something go wrong - my personal view based on experience for what it is worth!

To be honest if you get a entry level bike from one of the top makers you're unlikely to go wrong so go with what feels best for you. Just try them all out. I went for a trek 1.2 as am a big armstrong fan (sucker for marketing!) but also for me the geometry felt more comfy than the Defy of Allez plus i prefered the paint job!

Also if you can get over buying a bike from Halfords the Boardman comp is great value for the spec you get. A friend has one and is very nice.

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Zaskar [133 posts] 6 years ago
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Ribble have the worst customer service/aftersales fact. Nice bikes though.

If you buy any bike-check out the warranty.

I know people who have Ribble's (I was going to buy one) great bikes with dire service-search Singletrackworld for the complaints.

Spesh and Trek have the best customer service/lifetime warranty-you may never use/need it. Mass produced

Halfords Boardman-great bike-sketchy service but good warranty. Bargain price.

I would not be too picky for a bike under £1500 as it's likely to be made in China lol.

1) Get a bike fit for yourself-find what brands fit you,
2) Check the warranty/aftersales/reputation,
3) Check bike shop reputation,
4) What do you want the bike to do now and future,
5) Factor clothing/helmet/lights/mudguards and Enjoy!

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TheMelonMan [3 posts] 6 years ago
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In defence of Ribble, my personal experience of dealing with them for well over 10 years has been great. Arguably there are going to be more adverse comments than other retailers in forums as the volume of their sales is significantly higher...but for me Ive purchased full bikes, wheels, shoes, tyres, pumps etc from them, had no problems returning goods and been able to get advice and clarity over the phone and by email.

I still think the build quality and component quality, and consequently the ride quality of smalller retailers (in comparison to Trek etc) is far better and would again suggest Dave Hinde, Graham Weigh, Ribble, Brian Rourke...youll get kitted out with a bike put together by a bike rider not a marketeer... and just because the value of the bike is £650 doesnt mean you cannot get a GREAT bike. Put your faith in someone who actually knows what they are doing. And these guys do.

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cat1commuter [1421 posts] 6 years ago
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I've bought components from Ribble, and have always found them quick and efficient. Most recently they had the best price on some Campag bits I needed.

I guess their bikes can be slow because they have a complete custom bike builder on their website. That's going to involve a lot of spannering, and if there is a backlog it will be very difficult to reduce it.

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TheHatter [770 posts] 6 years ago
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I've found Ribble okay when buying components. And whenever I've asked advice they've come back to me with sound comments. Also if you're thinking internet purchase Wiggle have always given me fantastic service. They're not the cheapest anymore but still competitive. also if you buy one of their bikes (as I did recently) they come fully built in a special (huge) box.

Also the "Focus Variado Expert 2009" looks a steal at under £650 with Shimano 105 if you happen to be a size small.

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Ricardo [4 posts] 6 years ago
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mmany thanks for info guys , weather permiting off to Evans weekend anfd possible cycle uk as they have a reasonable selection to compare 3 bikes against each other, once decided will purchase from local stockist
willkeep allinformed

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Simon E [2744 posts] 6 years ago
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Ricardo wrote:

eather permiting off to Evans weekend anfd possible cycle uk as they have a reasonable selection to compare 3 bikes against each other

This is the way to do it - try as many bikes as you can. Spec is often very similar at a given price point and TBH there aren't any bad bikes, so it's mainly down to personal preference.