Carrying your load

by bezz333   August 29, 2014  

Just a quicky

Is it better to carry your inner tubes, CO2 canisters and multi tool beneath your saddle or carry them in your jersey pockets?

If it's on your person then your bike is lighter and so you can climb higher plus it makes your bike more streamline or does it not make a difference?

What are your views.

Andrew

21 user comments

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Some people seem to think even little saddle bags are wrong. However, I have a mini one that holds 2 tubes, self-adhesive patches, 2 CO2 canisters & inflator, multi-tool including chain tool and spare quick link. That lives on the bike so I don't have to worry about picking up tools and stuff on the way out.

posted by SteppenHerring [221 posts]
29th August 2014 - 22:33

5 Likes

Weight wise it doesn't matter if it's on you or the bike - you're still working getting the "system" up the hill. I find there isn't enough room in the bag and with 3 jersey pockets for everything you need...can't imagine not having a saddle bag

posted by Daveyraveygravey [64 posts]
29th August 2014 - 22:40

8 Likes

I use a tiny saddle bad for multitool, tyre levers, patches, cable ties. I stick tubes and mini pump in jersey pocket.

lisa76uk's picture

posted by lisa76uk [38 posts]
29th August 2014 - 22:42

1 Like

The other option is a storage bottle in one of your bottle cages. Whatever you're most comfortable with is best.

Ah! Condor

posted by Bedfordshire Clanger [320 posts]
29th August 2014 - 23:31

1 Like

Thanks all, but it's not about how to carry your tools etc but where. On your person or on your bike. Being a bit of a weight weenie do I get the best advantage with the tools on the bike it on your person?

Do I get more of an advantage with the tools on the bike or on me.

posted by bezz333 [12 posts]
30th August 2014 - 6:21

0 Likes

It makes no difference-you are still moving the same weight, you, bike and tools etc. whether you carry them on the bike in some way or on you.

bobinski

posted by bobinski [126 posts]
30th August 2014 - 6:36

6 Likes

My rule has always to let the bike take the load.

You never see cowboys with rucksacks etc. They get the horses to carry the luggage.

Keep the pockets for sweets and rations etc. Tools and stuff live on the bike, then I don't forget them.

posted by gazza_d [235 posts]
30th August 2014 - 8:34

2 Likes

Hauling weight uphill requires the same effort regardless of whether it's on the bike or the rider.

If you're bothered about being streamlined then you should be wearing a skinsuit and a race number. A standard jersey will create more drag than a small seat pack, and even more when the pockets are full of stuff.

Tools, tubes, keys etc in the pack, pockets carry food and gilet/jacket. Mini pump lives on the bottle mount. As already stated, if it's on the bike it is always ready, there's no pre-ride faff.

I wouldn't want a pump, tools, phone etc in my pocket; partly because the pockets sag and feel cumbersome and there is less room for food and gilet; but also if I crash it could damage my back, a phone would get smashed or house keys get lost in the hedge.

Schwalbe, Continental and others make micro seat packs but I prefer the larger ones that have room for a second tube and other items.

Simon E's picture

posted by Simon E [2001 posts]
30th August 2014 - 14:26

2 Likes

I don't carry anything on my person that could stab me if I came off. Its handy to have food in pockets, but a underseat bag is ideal for sharp tools/minipump/keys.

After a few hours in the saddle, anything heavy/awkwardly shaped will cause your back to complain, so why do it?

posted by Trull [63 posts]
30th August 2014 - 14:29

4 Likes

As many seem to have already said, a small saddle bag can take a pretty impressive amount of stuff. It's basically like a third bottle cage, but in a more aerodynamic* position, and... not where the existing bottle cages are.

I had this conundrum before buying one. My bottle cages were needed for bottles and my pockets were needed for food and clothing (especially in the colder months), which left everything else in limbo. Enter saddlebag/Sandman.

For anyone not constantly riding with a support vehicle laden with several spare bikes behind them, I think saddle bags are a wise investment.

*I've never heard this stated, but I'm pretty sure it's true.

posted by Quince [155 posts]
30th August 2014 - 16:30

4 Likes

The difference if you support weight on your body is this can affect comfort/cooling and possibly very slight skeletal/muscular load - your lower back needs to be treated with respect. Of course if you carry the weight on your knee that's another discussion Smile

posted by ydrol [12 posts]
31st August 2014 - 13:23

0 Likes

The weight is the same whichever but getting out of the saddle on a climb your having to lift the weight in your jersey pocket. Gets even worse if you swing about when hauling on the bars. Try taking your bottle out of its cage and put it in your pocket.

posted by Maggers [57 posts]
31st August 2014 - 14:26

1 Like

It's better to mount your tools and paraphernalia on the handlebars than behind the saddle because it's easier to push the extra weight up the hill rather than pull it.

joemmo's picture

posted by joemmo [861 posts]
31st August 2014 - 17:49

4 Likes

Tuck it down the front of your shorts and cycle along with a smug look on your face.

posted by Ratfink [37 posts]
31st August 2014 - 18:29

1 Like

Maggers wrote:
Try taking your bottle out of its cage and put it in your pocket.

This trick only works while riding up Mont Aigoual

posted by SideBurn [838 posts]
31st August 2014 - 20:27

0 Likes

It has already been said by everybody else, but saddlebag's are a great way to carry tools, CO2, spare tube, keys. Use your pockets for phone, cash, food, clothes and maybe a second spare tube.

Most of the pros use saddlebags on training rides; there's nothing wrong with them. Having a pump that attaches to your frame is a smart move too. I've got a Lezyne Road Drive that works really well for me.

posted by adrianoconnor [52 posts]
31st August 2014 - 21:23

0 Likes

Well I'm impressed, 16 comments and no one has mentioned... "the rules".

I thought there was some cycling version of Godwin's law the guaranteed such a mention within the first ten posts in any discussion such as this.

posted by bikebot [645 posts]
31st August 2014 - 22:46

3 Likes

Daveyraveygravey wrote:
Weight wise it doesn't matter if it's on you or the bike - you're still working getting the "system" up the hill. I find there isn't enough room in the bag and with 3 jersey pockets for everything you need...can't imagine not having a saddle bag

I think you will find that if you tape them to your rims it does make a difference Wink

posted by paulrbarnard [136 posts]
1st September 2014 - 13:23

0 Likes

It depends how you ride

If it's rough stuff kit is best in your pockets or in a camelbak or similar, this is down to what is known as "unsprung weight". It's normally a concept for bikes with front or full suspension, it's best to have all the parts south of the head tube and rear suspension pivot as light as possible as it improves how well your bike tracks the terrain. On a rigid bike used for rough stuff such a crosser your legs and arms are the suspension so you want sprung weight instead - as in on your person.

If it's simply riding on smooth(ish) roads then it doesn't matter where you carry kit, saddle bags are fine, even a carradice.

posted by MKultra [243 posts]
1st September 2014 - 16:23

0 Likes

Wow. Thanks for all your comments

I tried two things over the last few days. I carried all my tools in my jersey and went for a ride. So uncomfortable and not much room for any food?

Managed to get 2 x tubes, 2 x Co2 canisters, pump head, leyzine multi tool, self adhesive patches, 2 x cable ties, 2 x thin latex gloves in my Topeak mini bag and carried some food in my jersey

From what everyone was saying there is no difference in the feeling of the bike when climbing hills. I had plenty of space for a gillet and gels.

OK it does spoil the look of the bike in my opinion having the bag on the back but for comfort and the possibility of knackering your back should you crash I think I will keep everything in my Topeag bag

Plus I can simply slide the bag off one bike and slide it onto my winter bike knowing I won't forget anything.

Thanks everyone.

posted by bezz333 [12 posts]
2nd September 2014 - 23:12

0 Likes

MKultra wrote:
It depends how you ride

If it's rough stuff kit is best in your pockets or in a camelbak or similar, this is down to what is known as "unsprung weight". It's normally a concept for bikes with front or full suspension, it's best to have all the parts south of the head tube and rear suspension pivot as light as possible as it improves how well your bike tracks the terrain. On a rigid bike used for rough stuff such a crosser your legs and arms are the suspension so you want sprung weight instead - as in on your person.

If it's simply riding on smooth(ish) roads then it doesn't matter where you carry kit, saddle bags are fine, even a carradice.


What are these suspension pivot and camelbak of which you speak!?Wink

posted by Daveyraveygravey [64 posts]
3rd September 2014 - 20:11

0 Likes