road or hybrid

by bellowsface   August 9, 2014  

Hi all I am new to the site. Hello. I currently ride a careers subway 2 hybrid and to fair I have had no problems whilst commuting to work on it. But I want to start to take riding a little more seriously with regards to fitness and weight loss. So here is the deal would I be better moving to a road bike? I ask because I will be starting some longer rides soon 20 klm plus at times.

Any helpful advice would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance

Mark

43 user comments

Latest 30 commentsNewest firstBest ratedAll

bellowsface wrote:
Hopefully I will have SPD pedals by weekend. Not too sure about flat bars. Do you mean change my standard bars for flat ones to alter my ride position? Sorry I am a noob to the terminology
Flat bars will lower your position slightly, you can alter this even more by swapping stem spacers around or even inverting the stem, it's up to you how far you go but as time goes on you will probably get used to being a bit more stretched out. It still won't be too radical a riding position. Bar ends add another hand position which is far better for climbing or cruising than simple riser bars.

posted by MKultra [287 posts]
12th August 2014 - 10:57

111 Likes

You need a new bike.

Everyone knows that new bikes have magical powers that give the rider
a energy boost, enables them to travel further and faster than ever before, and make them look darn awesome to bystanders.

posted by Binky [115 posts]
15th August 2014 - 14:49

120 Likes

I have a kona mtb to which I fitted wide road tyres and used it for a year a put 1500 miles on it. I used it for off and on road. With a maximum of 68 miles in one outing. I then purchased a Boardman CXR9.4DI2 fitted it with initially 32mm road tyres, did my first 100 mile sportive this April. Lately I fitted 25mm durano tyres adjusted the stem(neck injury recovery) and did two more 100 mile sportives.

My Kona I average about 15mph, my boardman I average 17.5mph over sportive distance. I like the way I can have a highish average (for me) on my Boardman. I still enjoy 50 milers on my Kona mainly off road though these days.

You need two bikes.

posted by CXR94Di2 [235 posts]
15th August 2014 - 15:11

109 Likes

I went from hybrid to road bike and lost 15kg (2 stone 5 pounds) in weight and counting.

There were a lot of factors.

Aerodynamics are better but as people say above, this can be achieved on your hybrid if you remove the spacers from under your stem, flip your stem so that it is downwards angled, get a stem that is more angled and point it downwards, (and as not yet mentioned) get some aerobars
e.g.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/triathlon-aero-bars-handlebar-extensions/dp/B000...
but I prefer
http://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/HBCISPIN/cinelli-spinaci-bar-extensions
and get a longer stem perhaps (good for most other than downhill and being too strung out. When you look down your handlebars should obscure your front wheel axle), cut of 1/2 inch or so from each end of your handlebars so that your bars a little narrower than your shoulders or at least no wider, and get lycra on your legs.

The SPD pedals will make a difference too. Try not to fall off -unclip when you slow down even if you do not intend to stop. Shoes with a hard sole (ideally carbon) and a ratchet to pull your heal into a cup improve power transer.

And I upvote thin slick tyres and at least higher tyre pressure for reduced rolling resistance. Tyres are not the place to get a softer ride.

A hollow saddle (SPD Selle, Cobb, Ism) takes pressure off your perineum - the soft bit in your crotch. This is important when you are heavy and yet want to get forward and lower.

With your lowered more aero position, putting weight on your hands, bike gloves are a must.

But I think that the biggest difference for me was that my hybrid bike was made of aluminium and my road bike is made of carbon. Bike shops and this web site seem to suggest that the difference between aluminum and carbon is that the latter is lighter, but for me that was irrelevant. I was carrying two bikes worth of flab. The important point about carbon is suspension. When you are heavy then suspension is important. It was the choclately smooth flexibility of the carbon frame that made me want to ride and lose all that weight.

If you look at cyclists on the road you will notice that there are a lot of people (half?!) that are on mountain bikes. Do they ride trails? I guess few of them do. I used to think that they were wallies who liked the macho look of big tyres. But then I tried a mountain bike and got it. Mountain bikes with their big tyres and shock absorbers provide suspension too.

I am not sugesting you get a mountain bike (unless you are more than about 4 stone overweight) but a carbon bike will provide the suspension, and be lighter than your hybrid.

Finally, unless you are rich, I would recommend you stay away from local bike shops, who generally sell expensive famous named bikes, and get an unfamous carbon road bike online e.g. from Ribble, in your current hybrid bike size. When purchasing a carbon road bike (with Shimano Tiagra or pref Shimano 105 or above parts) the price differential can be pretty enourmous. When I decided to get back into cycling I wasted about a year and 1200 UKB on another harsh aluminium hybrid while being flattered and wowed by lBS jaron.

If you are mechanically minded you could swap your hybrid bike frame for a carbon frame, and even put road bike handlebars on in. You can get carbon frames from about 250UKP online.

PS
I see that your bike is well reviewed
http://reviews.halfords.com/4028/960138/reviews.htm
And if it is the "commuter" version it has an adjustable stem. As well as slamming (removing the spacers from below the stem to above the stem) try adjusting the stem so that it points downwards.

posted by timtak [27 posts]
16th August 2014 - 1:22

110 Likes

Still waiting for my SPD's to get here

posted by bellowsface [9 posts]
16th August 2014 - 1:49

110 Likes

I too have the Carrera 2 subway(£150 off fleabay) - it's a good commuter bike. I put SPD, ChargeSpoon saddle and Schwalbe Kojaks on and it rolls quite fast on the flats and downhill. I'm 5'10" currently 232 lbs / 105 kg. So I'm a bit of a clydesdale. And the bike is not the lightest in the world. The ride is silky smooth on the tyres, which is good because I have lower back problems so like to keep shock to a minimum.

I will treat myself to a 2nd hand CycloCross bike when I lose another 14 lbs. and throw some wide slicks on it (looking to spend £300-400 on something originally priced around the £1K mark and has been well looked after).

I'm hoping that when I do I will get maybe 1-2 mph increase for the same effort.
although if I change bike now I might get some positive re-inforcement from going a bit quicker, and thus ride harder. It is a bit of a drag being last up the hills in my cycle club, but I suspect my weight is more of a factor than the bikes weight. But every little bit helps! Decisions decisions ....

posted by ydrol [29 posts]
17th August 2014 - 12:36

109 Likes

Having just bought a road bike, a Specialized Roubaix Triple to run alongside my Carrera Crossfire 2, I can speak from personal experience and say it is a revelation! Whereas I used to be in the easiest gear possible on the hybrid, I look down at the Roubaix gears and think "yeah I still got plenty to go!!" apart from where I have just been this evening, where I dropped down to the 30:30 and still had to stop for three rests! At least I never walked as I did with the hybrid!! (I couldn't with my spd shoes on!) I am having great fun on Strava beating my previous hybrid based bests with the Roubaix, if you have gotten into cycling and am mildly competitive I think a road based platform is the only way to go! (IF you want to go faster)

posted by cbrookes75 [32 posts]
17th August 2014 - 23:04

110 Likes

Just did a 60 mile sportive yesterday on a £500 Rapid 4 hybrid from Giant. Average speed was about 14 mph, which included quite a few uphill bits where I overtook some people on regular road bikes.
Unless you're obsessive about going as fast as you can at all times, I'd say a hybrid is just fine.

posted by JeevesBath [131 posts]
18th August 2014 - 14:01

109 Likes

timtak wrote:
I went from hybrid to road bike and lost 15kg (2 stone 5 pounds) in weight and counting.

There were a lot of factors.

Aerodynamics are better but as people say above, this can be achieved on your hybrid if you remove the spacers from under your stem, flip your stem so that it is downwards angled, get a stem that is more angled and point it downwards, (and as not yet mentioned) get some aerobars
e.g.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/triathlon-aero-bars-handlebar-extensions/dp/B000...
but I prefer
http://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/HBCISPIN/cinelli-spinaci-bar-extensions
and get a longer stem perhaps (good for most other than downhill and being too strung out. When you look down your handlebars should obscure your front wheel axle), cut of 1/2 inch or so from each end of your handlebars so that your bars a little narrower than your shoulders or at least no wider, and get lycra on your legs.

The SPD pedals will make a difference too. Try not to fall off -unclip when you slow down even if you do not intend to stop. Shoes with a hard sole (ideally carbon) and a ratchet to pull your heal into a cup improve power transer.

And I upvote thin slick tyres and at least higher tyre pressure for reduced rolling resistance. Tyres are not the place to get a softer ride.

A hollow saddle (SPD Selle, Cobb, Ism) takes pressure off your perineum - the soft bit in your crotch. This is important when you are heavy and yet want to get forward and lower.

With your lowered more aero position, putting weight on your hands, bike gloves are a must.

But I think that the biggest difference for me was that my hybrid bike was made of aluminium and my road bike is made of carbon. Bike shops and this web site seem to suggest that the difference between aluminum and carbon is that the latter is lighter, but for me that was irrelevant. I was carrying two bikes worth of flab. The important point about carbon is suspension. When you are heavy then suspension is important. It was the choclately smooth flexibility of the carbon frame that made me want to ride and lose all that weight.

If you look at cyclists on the road you will notice that there are a lot of people (half?!) that are on mountain bikes. Do they ride trails? I guess few of them do. I used to think that they were wallies who liked the macho look of big tyres. But then I tried a mountain bike and got it. Mountain bikes with their big tyres and shock absorbers provide suspension too.

I am not sugesting you get a mountain bike (unless you are more than about 4 stone overweight) but a carbon bike will provide the suspension, and be lighter than your hybrid.

Finally, unless you are rich, I would recommend you stay away from local bike shops, who generally sell expensive famous named bikes, and get an unfamous carbon road bike online e.g. from Ribble, in your current hybrid bike size. When purchasing a carbon road bike (with Shimano Tiagra or pref Shimano 105 or above parts) the price differential can be pretty enourmous. When I decided to get back into cycling I wasted about a year and 1200 UKB on another harsh aluminium hybrid while being flattered and wowed by lBS jaron.

If you are mechanically minded you could swap your hybrid bike frame for a carbon frame, and even put road bike handlebars on in. You can get carbon frames from about 250UKP online.

PS
I see that your bike is well reviewed
http://reviews.halfords.com/4028/960138/reviews.htm
And if it is the "commuter" version it has an adjustable stem. As well as slamming (removing the spacers from below the stem to above the stem) try adjusting the stem so that it points downwards.

You might struggle with that one as a Carrera Subway tends to use MTB/Treking components which are the wrong OLN, wheel size (26") and they use band on front mechs.

Unless you are suggesting a carbon MTB frame which will present problems with the suspension correction which tends to be based around a 100-150mm suspension fork these days.

Carbon is not the be all and end all and doesn't offer that magical leap in performance IMHO.

What could be done for rather less money is getting the wheels rebuilt on the same hub with 700c road rims. With 23mm tyres on they will slot straight into a 26" MTB frame, Cannondale in fact used to sell MTB's with two wheel sets at one stage.

I would also avoid drop bar conversions on what is a MTB frame as top tube length is always too great in comparison to a road frame with the same virtual top tube height.

posted by MKultra [287 posts]
18th August 2014 - 14:19

109 Likes

JeevesBath wrote:
Just did a 60 mile sportive yesterday on a £500 Rapid 4 hybrid from Giant. Average speed was about 14 mph, which included quite a few uphill bits where I overtook some people on regular road bikes.
Unless you're obsessive about going as fast as you can at all times, I'd say a hybrid is just fine.

I see the Rapid 4 has a straight fork, whereas the Carrera hybrids generally have suspension forks, I assume this is where most the weight is added? Before getting a road bike I did contemplate replacing the Suspension fork with a normal one? Would that be possible?

posted by cbrookes75 [32 posts]
18th August 2014 - 16:31

108 Likes

Hi all. Some fantastic help from you all. I took the bike out for the first time with the SPD's on felt great just some minor adjustments to make.
My carerra doesn't have suspension forks.
Just ordered some of those aero bwrs

posted by bellowsface [9 posts]
18th August 2014 - 21:46

110 Likes

cbrookes75 wrote:
JeevesBath wrote:
Just did a 60 mile sportive yesterday on a £500 Rapid 4 hybrid from Giant. Average speed was about 14 mph, which included quite a few uphill bits where I overtook some people on regular road bikes.
Unless you're obsessive about going as fast as you can at all times, I'd say a hybrid is just fine.

I see the Rapid 4 has a straight fork, whereas the Carrera hybrids generally have suspension forks, I assume this is where most the weight is added? Before getting a road bike I did contemplate replacing the Suspension fork with a normal one? Would that be possible?

I actually have both styles of hybrid, the Giant and also a Trek with suspension fork which I tend to use more for commuting and cycling with the kids etc. I am not technical enough to know if you can replace a suspension fork with straight fork, but have to say that the whole package between the two is completely different, not just the type of fork. The Giant Rapid is much more road oriented (imagine almost a low-end road bike with flat bars) in terms of frame and gearing, and the brakes are noticeably more effective.
Having said that, I use my Trek for the commute to work (15 miles each way) just fine.

posted by JeevesBath [131 posts]
19th August 2014 - 10:33

111 Likes

The difference between cycling on a hybrid compared with cycling on a road bike is like the difference between running in a pair of Doc Martens and running in a pair of trainers.

posted by HalfWheeler [128 posts]
19th August 2014 - 15:07

111 Likes

HalfWheeler wrote:
The difference between cycling on a hybrid compared with cycling on a road bike is like the difference between running in a pair of Doc Martens and running in a pair of trainers.

Fairly true, but I hate the false impression that people have to have the latest shiny kit in order to do something. If getting fit is your aim, then time on any bike is the important thing.

posted by JeevesBath [131 posts]
20th August 2014 - 7:51

102 Likes

HalfWheeler wrote:
The difference between cycling on a hybrid compared with cycling on a road bike is like the difference between running in a pair of Doc Martens and running in a pair of trainers.

It's really all about tyres. A hybrid with GP4000s is more fun to ride than
any road bike with Marathon Pluses.
For anything other than racing and competitive fast clun runs road bikes are way overrated.

I don't follow trends. Trends follow me.

posted by BBB [188 posts]
20th August 2014 - 11:51

101 Likes

BBB wrote:
HalfWheeler wrote:
The difference between cycling on a hybrid compared with cycling on a road bike is like the difference between running in a pair of Doc Martens and running in a pair of trainers.

It's really all about tyres. A hybrid with GP4000s is more fun to ride than
any road bike with Marathon Pluses.
For anything other than racing and competitive fast clun runs road bikes are way overrated.

Totally agree that tyres are the cheapest, most effective upgrade you can buy. I would suggest running tubulars but that might be a step too far right now.

Riding with a club would be a great idea though - you'll have access to a lot of people who'll be able to assist you, and the social side is good fun. Most clubs have a range of rides on a Sat/Sun for a range of abilities.

As someone said - if its fitness and weight loss you are after, its the amount of energy you burn cycling that matters, not the speed you do. A road bike makes it that little bit easier to work aerobically, which you'll be able to do for a more extended period than a very heavy bike that makes it more strength based, and will make you stop earlier. So I cant agree road bikes are overrated...

posted by edster99 [207 posts]
20th August 2014 - 12:21

101 Likes

BBB wrote:
HalfWheeler wrote:
The difference between cycling on a hybrid compared with cycling on a road bike is like the difference between running in a pair of Doc Martens and running in a pair of trainers.

It's really all about tyres. A hybrid with GP4000s is more fun to ride than
any road bike with Marathon Pluses.
For anything other than racing and competitive fast clun runs road bikes are way overrated.

I guess it depends what you are used to. I tend to the view that hybrids are pointless. I have ridden MTB blue routes on 25mm tyres on a steel winter road bike, and have done red routes on my cyclocross bike.

I have never owned a MTB but hired a hardtail in Mallorca. TBH the front suspension made a big difference going down rocky routes, but I find the handling of flat bars very strange and awkward.

My eldest lad (aged 8) has a Islabikes Beinn 24 and is usually around the podium in the Yorkshire cyclocross league, but got hammered out of sight in his sole appearance at the White Rose Track league. He was the only one who didn't have a road bike. I just pumped up his nobblies a bit. The upright position of a hybrid catches the wind badly at higher speeds, so makes it very difficult to go fast. (He now wants a bike with drop bars!)

I agree that tyres make the biggest difference, but most hybrids come with wide rims, and my (admittedly limited and historic) experience with narrow tyres on very wide rims wasn't great. To be fair that was before hooked rims, and I know the current fashion is for wider rims.

posted by Chris James [215 posts]
20th August 2014 - 12:22

101 Likes

Chris James wrote:
BBB wrote:
HalfWheeler wrote:
The difference between cycling on a hybrid compared with cycling on a road bike is like the difference between running in a pair of Doc Martens and running in a pair of trainers.

It's really all about tyres. A hybrid with GP4000s is more fun to ride than
any road bike with Marathon Pluses.
For anything other than racing and competitive fast clun runs road bikes are way overrated.

I guess it depends what you are used to. I tend to the view that hybrids are pointless.

For the record I don't think hybrids make sense either and they are nothing more than a creation of marketers.
"Fast" narrow tyres are wasted on a bike with upright position and most of 35mm ish tyres are low-end slow rollers anyway.
Comfort/city/fitness/urban bikes should be fitted with high volume tyres like Schwalbe Supermotos or even fast rolling XC tyres.
The bike in the picture is what I've been using for commuting, sportives and weekend rides for a few years. It's a perfect compromise. With the right tyres (AKA Pluma, Furious Fred or Racing Ralph (run tubeless) it's fast on the road (within 0.5mph compared to a road bike) and uber comfortable in the urban jungle (Southampton cycle network...)

WP_20140626_002 (1).jpg

I don't follow trends. Trends follow me.

posted by BBB [188 posts]
20th August 2014 - 13:52

99 Likes

BBB wrote:
Chris James wrote:
BBB wrote:
HalfWheeler wrote:


I guess it depends what you are used to. I tend to the view that hybrids are pointless.

For the record I don't think hybrids make sense either and they are nothing more than a creation of marketers.

I ride a road tourer for commuting and I have a weekend road bike for fun. I also have an MTB. I don't have a hybrid. Well cos I have a specific bike for what I need to do.

But hybrids make sense for people that have one bike. You know those people that aren't cyclists but ride a bike. The hybrid is enough of a track bike to get by and enough of a road bike to commute. It's a bit of a jack of all trades really but when you just have one cheap bike to cycle on in a variety of circumstances it makes sense.

BTW marketing can be defined as finding out what people want and giving it to them. It looks like a lot of people wanted a bit of an all rounder as their bike.

Cycling is like a church - many attend, but few understand.

posted by oozaveared [745 posts]
20th August 2014 - 14:51

99 Likes

BBB wrote:
HalfWheeler wrote:
The difference between cycling on a hybrid compared with cycling on a road bike is like the difference between running in a pair of Doc Martens and running in a pair of trainers.

It's really all about tyres. A hybrid with GP4000s is more fun to ride than
any road bike with Marathon Pluses.
For anything other than racing and competitive fast clun runs road bikes are way overrated.

Overrated? Mmm, curious choice of words. Plenty of people neither race nor go out on fast club runs (including myself for many years) and ride road bikes. Why? Well, try doing 50, 60, 70 mile runs (or even more!) on a bolt upright hybrid in windy Britain and you'll know why.

posted by HalfWheeler [128 posts]
20th August 2014 - 15:14

101 Likes

HalfWheeler wrote:
BBB wrote:
HalfWheeler wrote:
The difference between cycling on a hybrid compared with cycling on a road bike is like the difference between running in a pair of Doc Martens and running in a pair of trainers.

It's really all about tyres. A hybrid with GP4000s is more fun to ride than
any road bike with Marathon Pluses.
For anything other than racing and competitive fast clun runs road bikes are way overrated.

Overrated? Mmm, curious choice of words. Plenty of people neither race nor go out on fast club runs (including myself for many years) and ride road bikes. Why? Well, try doing 50, 60, 70 mile runs (or even more!) on a bolt upright hybrid in windy Britain and you'll know why.

By "overrated" I meant performance gains that some people here quote. Road bikes may feel faster due to more sensitive steering, lighter weight and (too)narrow tyres at 100PSI but as I said in my previous post any rigid bike from a hybrid to a mountain bike set up correctly (aero position) and with the right tyres can be just as fast (let's not argue about fractions of a single mph) and pleasant to ride. I've done many long rides on various bikes from a 5" full susp mountain bike with locked suspension and reversed and slammed stem (it wasn't slow or uncomfortable during a 66m ride round the IOW) to a carbon road bike.
Setup and tyres are (almost) everything.

As for a "bolt upright hybrid" it's an extreme example but anyway I see too many weekend warriors on "endurance" road bikes riding in semi upright position and not using drops in strong winds... They can't go lower due to the size of their bellies, lack of flexibility and lack of a proper fit (bent back, not rotating the pelvis forward etc) so their road bikes aren't really that "fast" and comfortable after all.

I don't follow trends. Trends follow me.

posted by BBB [188 posts]
20th August 2014 - 19:43

96 Likes

Thinking on it you're right of course. A whole industry based on false ideas. How could we have all been so wrong?

Strange thing though, I know many people who have joined cycling groups or clubs on hybrids and within months ditched them for road bikes complaining that they were too slow. You would think that empirical evidence would trump anything but maybe they just hadn't thought it through properly...

posted by HalfWheeler [128 posts]
20th August 2014 - 20:48

96 Likes

BBB wrote:
HalfWheeler wrote:
BBB wrote:
HalfWheeler wrote:
...
As for a "bolt upright hybrid" it's an extreme example but anyway I see too many weekend warriors on "endurance" road bikes riding in semi upright position and not using drops in strong winds... They can't go lower due to the size of their bellies, lack of flexibility and lack of a proper fit (bent back, not rotating the pelvis forward etc) so their road bikes aren't really that "fast" and comfortable after all.

That's true enough. The marketeers know the size and shape of their target market hence the evolution of the 'endurance' bike. But for a person unrestricted by that, your normal road bike will get you lower and more aero in most cases.

posted by edster99 [207 posts]
20th August 2014 - 21:15

95 Likes

I haven't really read the flurry of activity above, but I can say from my own experience, moving from a Carrera Front suspension hybrid to a Specialized Roubaix, the Roubaix just keeps getting better, I have been out tonight and gone on my furthest ride, a mere 71.5 Km. I feel as fresh as a daisy and if it weren't so cold (and dark) I would have carried on further! I never felt that way after being out and about on the hybrid, it always felt like a slog, whether that was the weight of the bike or the weight of me or the stupid unlockable suspension I don't know.

I am however glad I bought the hybrid as it introduced me to cycling gently, I don't know how I'd have fared if I'd have bought a carbon Tarmac straight off?

For me only the super fit supercyclists would say "it doesn't matter what bike you have!" I have no doubt that Bradley Wiggins and the like would beat me easily if I were on the road bike and they were on the hybrid. But cycling doesn't have to be a competition you can just cycle for the fun and fitness!

posted by cbrookes75 [32 posts]
20th August 2014 - 22:12

95 Likes

Did my first end-to-end on a hybrid (10 days, but I was unavoidably delayed). Also my 2nd (a more leisurely 3 weeks). That said, my current distance bike has road geometry and I wouldn't go back. Not so much that I'm a stickler for geometry (that's another hybrid discussion); it's probably more important that it fits me so fine.

posted by Sam Walker [72 posts]
21st August 2014 - 6:02

90 Likes

Well i have taken some of your advice and dropped my bars down slightly by moving the spacers, fitted spd's and bought some tri bars which i couldn't fit when they came due to my stem being huge so new stem and bars needed. But i did my daily commute this morning in full Lycra too and shed a massive time off my ride in. Saying that hardly any wind and traffic very light. Looking forward to see if i have such good results on ride home.

posted by bellowsface [9 posts]
21st August 2014 - 9:38

89 Likes

I think next big thing will be change tyres but not sure what size i can use. My rims look a lot thinner than current tyres fitted.

posted by bellowsface [9 posts]
21st August 2014 - 9:42

89 Likes

As a "newbie" this thread has been enlightening, I bought a Boardman Hybrid MX Sport not expecting to cover more the 10 miles per outing,but after a month I'm now covering 30+ miles per trip. I'm keen to extend my range which I now suspect will require the purchase of something better suited to the task the question is which bike to buy. I understand the concept of rigidity reduces ride comfort and this has led me to consider the Trek Domain with the decoupling thingy (I'm all about the tech) is my thought process sound? I can probably get away with spending up to £1500 before the Mrs demands a change of car, any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Steve Jones

posted by Tiffin15 [17 posts]
21st August 2014 - 12:21

87 Likes

I heartily recommend the Specialized Roubaix Sport Triple! As I said above the furthest I have gone is only 71.5 Km, but had it not been cold and dark I could have gone on for double that easily. My only criticism of the bike is that the "sport" saddle is awfully hard, I got around that with a gel cover though! I have done 333.4 Km in the week that I have had it. It was 1400 quid on buy now twelve months interest free credit!

posted by cbrookes75 [32 posts]
21st August 2014 - 15:44

89 Likes

Tiffin15 wrote:
As a "newbie" this thread has been enlightening, I bought a Boardman Hybrid MX Sport not expecting to cover more the 10 miles per outing,but after a month I'm now covering 30+ miles per trip. I'm keen to extend my range which I now suspect will require the purchase of something better suited to the task the question is which bike to buy. I understand the concept of rigidity reduces ride comfort and this has led me to consider the Trek Domain with the decoupling thingy (I'm all about the tech) is my thought process sound? I can probably get away with spending up to £1500 before the Mrs demands a change of car, any advice would be greatly appreciated.

The man maketh the bike to be honest.

Bikes in the same price bracket are often much of a muchness. If they're made from the same material then the difference between a £1500 Specialized and a £1500 Trek is illusory. All the components will be made the same two companies (SRAM and Shimano, Campagnolo don't really start until you're north of £1500), the finishing kits will be similar, it's just the frames that will be different looking. But that's superficial, a lot of the frames will be made, to the manufacturers spec, in the same factory in the far east. So a frame manufacturer in China could be building frames for Giant, Specialized, Focus, Trek etc, etc.

Buy a road bike, get the miles in, you'll be grand.

posted by HalfWheeler [128 posts]
21st August 2014 - 17:59

89 Likes