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I am life long obsessive cyclist, and I believe I have in general always been a polite and courteous rider, I wave at the rider across the road, ask if people are alright if they look like they are crashing and offer the gel if needed, stop if someone has a mechanical and offer assistance. I welcomed the on slaught of mamils & mawils with their erratic riding styles. It benefited cycling as a whole. However today I am over it. If you have ridden for along time you sense and know who are new to the game, and today during an 88 mile ride I experienced 3 episodes that now make me realise why the non cycling driver is bad mouthing us as a whole. (even though 50% of the drivers will be shite at driving)

Number 1: approaching rider from behind on a single carriage way, I shout on your right mate a number of times, louder and louder, until I pull out giving him a good 5ft, he did not hear me, s##ts himself when I shout as loud as I can, are you Fcuking deaf? Swerves towards me forcing me onto the other side of the road!!!!! Then I notice the earphones. A complete oblivious dullard who frankly deserves to be knocked off.

Number 2: riding along the lanes with a good view of the road ahead, I see in the distance six riders, 3 abreast! All in their sky / BMC ebay kit. Of course they will move.... Oh, no they didn't, they just looked at me and carried on riding towards me three abreast! I just sped up and forced them on to the grass verge, followed by a couple of expletives.

Number 3: (Nearly home) rider coming towards me, I am cooling down so sitting up spinning and we start to pass I look at him raise a hand and say hello, he looks at me then looks at road with no response. That tipped me over the edge, I chased him down and asked him if my politeness offended him? He hadn't seen me, even though we were only 15ft apart bright sunshine and I was in a bright red kit.

I embraced the raised profile that British cycling has gotten from all the good stuff that has happened, but out on the road I am not so sure if it's been a good thing?

60 comments

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SideBurn [890 posts] 1 year ago
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Bad day in the office?  14
Number 1. You would have looked silly if he was deaf  13 Why shout at someone you are catching up with?
Number 2. They would have got out of the way, they probably wonder what is up with you.
Number 3. Who cares if 'they' don't wave back?
I ride a bike, have done so for years, acknowledge everyone (even mtb riders  13 ) Offer assistance, try and be the all round good guy...
Still got a arse clenching punishment pass from a c**t in a 7.5t Royal Mail lorry on my last ride (on a nice straight empty road); these people are the real problem.
I am out there for the buzz of tyre on tarmac, wind in the hair, the wiz of the chain, trying to beat my times on Strava... All that old bollox....
I know 'we' get judged by the behaviour of others, but can you honestly say your behaviour was exemplary? Discuss  45

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notfastenough [3661 posts] 1 year ago
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Number 1 depends how quick the OP was going. I don't typically call out to pass on my own, but blasting along on a chaingang can scare people because of the speed we pass them , so I call it then.

Number 2 is a bit inconsiderate of them. Forcing them off isn't great though.

Number 3, ok maybe chasing him was a little OTT!

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Crosshair [12 posts] 1 year ago
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So just to check,
1. You swore really loudly at someone
2. You ran some people off the road for no good reason
3. You chased down someone who has no connection with you other than a chosen mode of transport because they offended you by not doing some Masonic wave?

Sorry, who's got issues again?

 35 40 102 45 103 <-- "Cyclist" earlier today

Pretty dodgy stinky bait but there's a rise for ya  1

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MartyMcCann [195 posts] 1 year ago
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Why do I get the feeling that on some other cycling forum somewhere there is an perplexed individual posting about the crazy guy who chased him down because he didn't wave at him?

There are many reasons why he may not have returned your friendly greeting:
-he may not actually have seen you
-he may not have been expecting someone to act as if he was his brother-in-arms simply because both of you chose the same mode of transport
-you don't know how far or hard he had ridden before hand-he could simply have been cooked and more focused on getting himself home rather than lookinga round at what other cyclists are up to

Honestly if these are the three worst things about your bike ride then thank your lucky stars. If you are driving, let someone out of a junction and they don't wave back then would you chase them down as well?

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fukawitribe [1430 posts] 1 year ago
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"I embraced the raised profile that British cycling has gotten from all the good stuff that has happened, but out on the road I am not so sure if it's been a good thing?"

If it's exposed more folk to people with as short a fuse and with as little patience, empathy, understanding or manners as you then, no, probably not a good thing. Calm down mate, some of that sounds annoying but please read it back to yourself and see if you still think your reactions are proportional.

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Ham-planet [112 posts] 1 year ago
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Number 1: If you're able to give someone 1.5 m clearance when overtaking, there's no need to get their attention.

Number 2: If you see illegal activity, report it to the police. Don't take the law into your own hands. I certainly wouldn't antagonise the criminal element by shouting expletives at them.

Number 3: Get over yourself. I'd wager the fellow did see you, but simply offered an excuse for terminating the conversation with an apparent nutjob as soon as possible. Chasing someone down because they didn't meet your arbitrary politeness standards is absurd.

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Argos74 [373 posts] 1 year ago
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Riding to work on one of these awful shared use cycle paths, I spot a roadie in full kit preparing to turn left into the road ahead of me. Make eye contact, nod him through. He says thankyou.

Out running with group of runners, at back of group on trail. Hear some MTBs coming up behind me, shout at group to go single file to let the riders through.

And in past half hour, coming up to junction with LH and RH lanes. Shoulder check, driver slows, eye contact, to let me take RH lane. Nice guy.

Brave new world? I'm hopeful. Little baby steps from all of us, and a better overall environment - political, infrastructure, legislative - and we might get there. We're gonna need more cake though. And coffee. Maybe another cake.

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freespirit1 [222 posts] 1 year ago
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The OP is also the individual that admitted on this forum to causing criminal damage to a fishing rod.

With his/her latest utterances is it any wonder that cyclists get a bad press.

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Flying Scot [908 posts] 1 year ago
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I always nod/ wave etc., but never actually waste any time in checking its acknowledged!

The real mamil issues I see on the lanes and hills ride in groups and have developed a style of riding they think is acceptable, similar to 2) above and other issues, obviously none have ever been in a club or rode with dyed in the wool roadies or tourers. Their favourite tricks:

1) passing lone riders then freewheeling and boxing you in.
2) pushing off from the roadside without looking behind them ( as they're listening for cars not looking for bikes)
3) taking up ten whole width of lanes and not knowing what to do when someone comes the other way.
4) after 1) doing it again when you pass them.......

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Leeroy_Silk [114 posts] 1 year ago
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I had a similar conversation with a group of friends recently regarding point 3. Mate was a little upset at some 'arsehole' who didn't acknowledge his cheery "hello". The conversation then targeted elitist arseholes from a local club who always refuse to acknowledge anyone.

The simple point is: Get over it! Your exclusive community has grown, all those Olympic successes, Team SKY, cost of fuel etc. has made some of the most unlikely people jump on bikes. Is it fair to get angry because of their apparent stupidity? In the same way is it fair to hate on every pro rider who doesn't always say wave back?
Take a cross section of modern society, would you put them in a room and expect everyone to get on? No, so why should adding a bike into the mix be any different.

I wave because I want to, not because I demand respect back. I and I suspect others want to believe you were maybe having a bad day, but if this is you behaving normally I kind of hope not to meet you from whichever direction you might attack.

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CXR94Di2 [1030 posts] 1 year ago
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I had the same ignorant pass by a cyclist this morning. Pulling out of the end of my road I saw another cyclist coming along the lane. Has I had just started cycling building up momentum. He comes sailing by, I glanced across for him to completely blank me. Maybe it was that I was wearing a backpack( loaded up with prudential 100 kit) or my Mtb cycle shorts. I don't know? After a few hundred yards I was up to speed a began to reel him in, then as I passed him with my weighty backpack and uncool shorts I nodded politely and left him behind, smug git  1

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Flying Scot [908 posts] 1 year ago
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CXR94Di2 wrote:

I had the same ignorant pass by a cyclist this morning. Pulling out of the end of my road I saw another cyclist coming along the lane. Has I had just started cycling building up momentum. He comes sailing by, I glanced across for him to completely blank me. Maybe it was that I was wearing a backpack( loaded up with prudential 100 kit) or my Mtb cycle shorts. I don't know? After a few hundred yards I was up to speed a began to reel him in, then as I passed him with my weighty backpack and uncool shorts I nodded politely and left him behind, smug git  1

Probably your shorts....

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Beatnik69 [286 posts] 1 year ago
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No 1 - Even if the guy didn't have earphones in he still may not have heard you. I was out a few days ago and there were a number of times when there were cars behind which I hadn't heard until my companion moved ahead or behind to go single file and let the car past. I couldn't hear very well because of the rush of wind in my ears.

No 2 - They should have been more considerate and moved but was there any need for you to speed up or swear at them?

No 3 - I don't always notice other cyclists, especially if I am concentrating on the road or thinking about something. I tend to acknowledge other cyclists when I see them and contrary to what a lot of people say it's usually the ones in lycra gear who nod or wave back. The ones who are apparently cycling to work tend to be the ones who ignore me. I just don't take it personally.

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glynr36 [637 posts] 1 year ago
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Get over it.
I rarely acknowledge other cyclists, I'm out doing my thing they're doing theirs.
Riding a bike isn't a membership to an elite club like you think, it's a sport and hobby.
If you'd have had a go at me like in 1 or 3 I'd probably have given you a black eye...

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Jo_ [21 posts] 1 year ago
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The OP sounds totally unhinged.  35

If you'd chased me down for not acknowledging you I'd be bloody petrified that some nutter was about to cause me harm. I say hi or nod to other cyclists regularly but sometimes I'm just cycling home thinking about what I'm going to cook for tea and I don't notice every single person I pass.

Needlessly shouting at another rider and then speeding up to run a group off the road? Pretty dreadful behaviour.

Also, get over your judgeypants snobbery about team kit. People enjoy their sport in different ways, and I'd prefer to cycle with a keen rider in team kit than with someone with an angry superiority complex.

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Leeroy_Silk [114 posts] 1 year ago
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Jo_ wrote:

Also, get over your judgeypants snobbery about team kit. People enjoy their sport in different ways, and I'd prefer to cycle with a keen rider in team kit than with someone with an angry superiority complex.

Can anyone tell me the difference between a cyclist in full team kit and a footie fan wearing their teams jersey?

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the_jm [36 posts] 1 year ago
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Leeroy_Silk wrote:

Can anyone tell me the difference between a cyclist in full team kit and a footie fan wearing their teams jersey?

Well, I don't know a single person who owns cycling kit that does not take part in their sport/hobby. The same cannot be said of football fans. Your point is?

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230548 [30 posts] 1 year ago
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I am afraid we are from another age i have been in all the similar situations described cycling is no longer the fraternity it was and although there are a great many competent and helpful cyclist out there. there are also a great many 'look how expensive my bike is' types out there who have carried there insular aggressive car habits into the biking world

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abudhabiChris [692 posts] 1 year ago
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"aggressive" habits?

Nobody was shouting at the OP, nobody forced him off the road or chased him down to demand that his presence be acknowledged... and yet you think other people are being aggressive?

Sounds like someone who is always on the lookout for a teacup where he can brew up a storm.

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Leeroy_Silk [114 posts] 1 year ago
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the_jm wrote:
Leeroy_Silk wrote:

Can anyone tell me the difference between a cyclist in full team kit and a footie fan wearing their teams jersey?

Well, I don't know a single person who owns cycling kit that does not take part in their sport/hobby. The same cannot be said of football fans. Your point is?

It was a question not a point.
I fail to see the difference between the two (violent football thuggery aside), why be judged showing support towards your favourite team? Or is this purely about stereotyping.
I don't particularly like the image certain brands portray but I'm not going to dislike an individual for choosing to wear what the want.

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glynr36 [637 posts] 1 year ago
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230548 wrote:

I am afraid we are from another age i have been in all the similar situations described cycling is no longer the fraternity it was and although there are a great many competent and helpful cyclist out there. there are also a great many 'look how expensive my bike is' types out there who have carried there insular aggressive car habits into the biking world

Oh get over yourself.
It never was a fraternity, it's a sport not a secret society..
The 'older' guys are the worst I find for elitism too, passing judgment on many things, the reality is they just can't handle the fact that they're getting dropped now.

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freespirit1 [222 posts] 1 year ago
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230548 wrote:

There are also a great many 'look how expensive my bike is' types out there who have carried there insular aggressive car habits into the biking world

I think I encountered one of them this morning, when riding my motorcycle to work.

Two cycle gear wearing occupants in a Silver Range Rover, the driver just chopped me out of the left hand lane.

If I had done it when I am driving I would expect to cop an earful of abuse.

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FluffyKittenofT... [1116 posts] 1 year ago
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1 & 2 - people, whatever mode of transport they use, are sometimes quite inconsiderate. If its not endangering your life, just say 'tsk tsk' to yourself and move on. Its not a new trend, it has always been that way.

3 - since when is one obliged to acknowledge everyone who happens to be using the same mode of transport as oneself? Are you one of those oddballs who insist on trying to make conversation with complete strangers on the bus (or, worse, the Tube) or saying hello to unknown pedestrians in the street?

Stop doing that! It's very unnerving. Just scowl and ignore everyone else's existence like what normal people do.

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S13SFC [129 posts] 1 year ago
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#3. You need to have a long hard look at your life mush if you think chasing some fella for not waving back is normal or acceptable behaviour.

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Matt eaton [733 posts] 1 year ago
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When did it become normal to shout 'on your right' when overtaking a stranger on the road? These calls are for race situtions, like lapping someone on a 'cross race, especially in a narrow section. On the road shouldn't you just overtake like any other vehicle? Next you'll be telling me you sound your horn when you overtake cyclists in the car; or do you wind the window down and shout at them?

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Tjuice [171 posts] 1 year ago
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Re: #1
Some decades back, when I was young (I'm guessing around 10 yrs old), I was cycling along a fairly narrow shared-use path (was once an old railway track), when a chap on a race bike came barrelling up on a race bike at some speed.
He shouted "on your right", or "keep to the left", or something like that. I was not expecting it and it completely spooked me, so in the heat of the moment, I panicked and ended up going right.

Race bike chap had to emergency brake and we both ended up still upright, having not collided, on the grass at the right hand side of the path. I apologised of course and he was grumpy but not angry.

As I reflect on this, I can't help feel that had he slowed down a little and just carefully worked his way past me (I was a child - I would not have been hard to overtake), rather than yelling at me at speed, the incident would not have happened. And the path was neither a race track, nor the open road.

Not sure this story really adds anything to this thread, but thought I'd share
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Matt eaton [733 posts] 1 year ago
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Tjuice wrote:

Re: #1
Some decades back, when I was young (I'm guessing around 10 yrs old), I was cycling along a fairly narrow shared-use path (was once an old railway track), when a chap on a race bike came barrelling up on a race bike at some speed.
He shouted "on your right", or "keep to the left", or something like that. I was not expecting it and it completely spooked me, so in the heat of the moment, I panicked and ended up going right.

Race bike chap had to emergency brake and we both ended up still upright, having not collided, on the grass at the right hand side of the path. I apologised of course and he was grumpy but not angry.

As I reflect on this, I can't help feel that had he slowed down a little and just carefully worked his way past me (I was a child - I would not have been hard to overtake), rather than yelling at me at speed, the incident would not have happened. And the path was neither a race track, nor the open road.

Not sure this story really adds anything to this thread, but thought I'd share
 1

Good story, and very relevant today. We still don't seem to have decided what/who these shared use paths are really for and I'm sure there are loads of examples like this happening all the time.

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Kapelmuur [294 posts] 1 year ago
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A few weeks ago I was left hooked by a chain gang from a local club, no warning of their approach, no acknowledgement of my presence, no indication they intended to turn left and no apology for making me do an emergency stop. I was invisible to them.

Later that week I caught another rider and stayed with him for a chat. It turned out that he was a club official and urged me to join a club. I described my recent experience and told him that I was unimpressed by the behaviour of club groups. His reply was that clubs were being spoiled by the influx of new cyclists who were not interested in learning the etiquette of the sport and "only joined for the jersey".

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Matt eaton [733 posts] 1 year ago
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Crosshouses wrote:

A few weeks ago I was left hooked by a chain gang from a local club, no warning of their approach, no acknowledgement of my presence, no indication they intended to turn left and no apology for making me do an emergency stop. I was invisible to them.

Later that week I caught another rider and stayed with him for a chat. It turned out that he was a club official and urged me to join a club. I described my recent experience and told him that I was unimpressed by the behaviour of club groups. His reply was that clubs were being spoiled by the influx of new cyclists who were not interested in learning the etiquette of the sport and "only joined for the jersey".

To be fair, we can't have it all. I'd draw a paralel with the BMX freestyle world where increased popularity, partly of BMX but more significantly of micro-scooters, has resulted in a lack of good skatepark etiquette. Trying to get a run in can be almost impossible at times for kids standing in stupid places or dropping in without looking. Everyone whinges about the scooter kids and how they are ruining skateparks but it's also true that the increase in participation in ramp-sports has resulted in more skateparks being built and the scooter kids (or rather their parents) play no small part in enuring that our indoor parks stay open.

Increased interest in road cycling will have many positive benefits. Increased club memberships mean more money for clubs to run events or improve facilities and with more bikes on the road our local authorities might even start to maintain the roads better (OK, I can dream can't I?). There are negative aspects of a sport becoming more mainstream but lets look to the positives as much as possible.

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bamilton wackad... [64 posts] 1 year ago
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Re. Tjuice's post: a similar thing happened to me in Vancouver. Some guy gave me about 5 seconds warning, spooked me and missed me by centimetres before speeding off screaming obscenities. Some London club riders (who shall remain nameless) have a reputation for this kind of behaviour in places where all kinds of people take their bike out - not just TT riders.

As a pedestrian or someone out for a leisurely ride, it can be pretty unnerving when somebody almost clips you when they bomb past - even with warning. Then you quite often get the statutory rolling of eyes or 'fuck sake' from the rider, as if to say 'this is my road - play by my rules'.

People cycle for different reasons and not everyone is out there to get PBs every time they leave the house. If there's limited space to pass, slow down and find a safe way to pass them without ruining their day out as well as potentially ruining your own. Granted, a lot of people could do with learning a bit more etiquette (and stop wearing headphones on the open road), but you live a longer happier life if you don't see red at every thing that gets in your path on a daily basis.

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