Is it a brave new world?

by Cyclist   August 8, 2014  

I am life long obsessive cyclist, and I believe I have in general always been a polite and courteous rider, I wave at the rider across the road, ask if people are alright if they look like they are crashing and offer the gel if needed, stop if someone has a mechanical and offer assistance. I welcomed the on slaught of mamils & mawils with their erratic riding styles. It benefited cycling as a whole. However today I am over it. If you have ridden for along time you sense and know who are new to the game, and today during an 88 mile ride I experienced 3 episodes that now make me realise why the non cycling driver is bad mouthing us as a whole. (even though 50% of the drivers will be shite at driving)

Number 1: approaching rider from behind on a single carriage way, I shout on your right mate a number of times, louder and louder, until I pull out giving him a good 5ft, he did not hear me, s##ts himself when I shout as loud as I can, are you Fcuking deaf? Swerves towards me forcing me onto the other side of the road!!!!! Then I notice the earphones. A complete oblivious dullard who frankly deserves to be knocked off.

Number 2: riding along the lanes with a good view of the road ahead, I see in the distance six riders, 3 abreast! All in their sky / BMC ebay kit. Of course they will move.... Oh, no they didn't, they just looked at me and carried on riding towards me three abreast! I just sped up and forced them on to the grass verge, followed by a couple of expletives.

Number 3: (Nearly home) rider coming towards me, I am cooling down so sitting up spinning and we start to pass I look at him raise a hand and say hello, he looks at me then looks at road with no response. That tipped me over the edge, I chased him down and asked him if my politeness offended him? He hadn't seen me, even though we were only 15ft apart bright sunshine and I was in a bright red kit.

I embraced the raised profile that British cycling has gotten from all the good stuff that has happened, but out on the road I am not so sure if it's been a good thing?

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Tjuice wrote:
Re: #1
Some decades back, when I was young (I'm guessing around 10 yrs old), I was cycling along a fairly narrow shared-use path (was once an old railway track), when a chap on a race bike came barrelling up on a race bike at some speed.
He shouted "on your right", or "keep to the left", or something like that. I was not expecting it and it completely spooked me, so in the heat of the moment, I panicked and ended up going right.

I've made this point before that shouts of "on your right/left" can confuse or panic a lot of people.

It's advisable to stick with saying it, but be aware that someone's thought process may be "what on my right"? Look right, drift while looking back over the shoulder, see fast approaching cyclist, panic, wobble, bang.

posted by farrell [1580 posts]
13th August 2014 - 14:07

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Matt eaton wrote:
Crosshouses wrote:
A few weeks ago I was left hooked by a chain gang from a local club, no warning of their approach, no acknowledgement of my presence, no indication they intended to turn left and no apology for making me do an emergency stop. I was invisible to them.

Later that week I caught another rider and stayed with him for a chat. It turned out that he was a club official and urged me to join a club. I described my recent experience and told him that I was unimpressed by the behaviour of club groups. His reply was that clubs were being spoiled by the influx of new cyclists who were not interested in learning the etiquette of the sport and "only joined for the jersey".

To be fair, we can't have it all. I'd draw a paralel with the BMX freestyle world where increased popularity, partly of BMX but more significantly of micro-scooters, has resulted in a lack of good skatepark etiquette. Trying to get a run in can be almost impossible at times for kids standing in stupid places or dropping in without looking. Everyone whinges about the scooter kids and how they are ruining skateparks but it's also true that the increase in participation in ramp-sports has resulted in more skateparks being built and the scooter kids (or rather their parents) play no small part in enuring that our indoor parks stay open.

Increased interest in road cycling will have many positive benefits. Increased club memberships mean more money for clubs to run events or improve facilities and with more bikes on the road our local authorities might even start to maintain the roads better (OK, I can dream can't I?). There are negative aspects of a sport becoming more mainstream but lets look to the positives as much as possible.

It's not just the scooter kids. The parents need education too. I go to Stockwell skatepark here in London regularly with my son so we can ride our BMXs. My son started there young and even when he was small, quickly appreciated that there was an etiquette and that the skaters took some lines while the BMXers took others, so he knew where to keep an eye out. But there are plenty of parents who wander up with young kids, let them into the skatepark and then either wander off leaving them, or lounge around at the side, unaware their offspring are causing mayhem and also in quite a lot of danger.

We also get a lot of idiots turning up at the BMX track - walking their dogs on it, walking or jogging round it and using their radio controlled cars, even while we have training sessions running.

OldRidgeback

posted by OldRidgeback [2308 posts]
13th August 2014 - 14:16

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Matt eaton - increased membership does not translate into more people organising, marshalling, serving tea or putting out signs; it's the same few every time. Enforcing group riding etiquette is infringing their civil liberties yet they expect to be led everywhere and are only interested in their Strava times.

Too many people think club events are provided solely for their benefit, that they can just turn up and ride/race and don't need to give anything back. Crosshouses' comment of "only joined for the jersey" is a fair one.

Simon E's picture

posted by Simon E [2059 posts]
13th August 2014 - 14:23

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Simon E wrote:
Matt eaton - increased membership does not translate into more people organising, marshalling, serving tea or putting out signs; it's the same few every time. Enforcing group riding etiquette is infringing their civil liberties yet they expect to be led everywhere and are only interested in their Strava times.

Too many people think club events are provided solely for their benefit, that they can just turn up and ride/race and don't need to give anything back. Crosshouses' comment of "only joined for the jersey" is a fair one.

Absolutly agreed, the comment is fair and accurate, particuarally given that many of those coming to road cycling are adults. I have more experience of BMX clubs where increased membership does tend to result in more willing helpers (as the sport is very youth-focused and not all parents ride), although it's still always the same few doing the bulk of the work.

The reality is that with increased popularity more and more folks will simply wish to pay their money and enjoy the ride and it's the same for all sports really. How many members of football clubs volunteer to coach youth teams? Just like cycling it's the usual handful of passionate individials. I'm not sure if this is a universally bad thing however ignoring group etiquette is unacceptable.

posted by Matt eaton [498 posts]
13th August 2014 - 14:50

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I am going to have to agree with some of the other posters here. I too have been cycling in a club since 1973. With that experience you learn certain bits of etiquette. However cycling has expanded from a niche little clubby thing (that has a lot to teach the newbies but let's not be preachy and boring about it) to a bigger more inclusive thing. Time was that if you were out riding on a decent bike with good kit on you were probably a club rider with race experience of some sort. But nowadays it may mean that you bought a bike and some kit last weekend and have no experience whatsoever.

We don't want to end up like the older members a stuffy golf club that has recently become a pay and play, tut tutting people for not knowing all the etiquette.

Indeed in your own article you show that the etiquette we have (shouting that you'll be coming past and which side) can be positively intimidating to people that are just out for a ride and suddenly hear a shout from behind. Even my practice of politely saying hello as I pass gently by has scared the bejeezus out of some of them.

But don't stop waving. The person that may not have responded to you may well start waving once a dozen of us have waved as we pass. A light might go on for them.

Club and race experience is great but use it to be an example and to pass it on gently not as a way to make the newcomers feel uncomfortable.

Cycling is like a church - many attend, but few understand.

posted by oozaveared [745 posts]
13th August 2014 - 14:52

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farrell wrote:
I've made this point before that shouts of "on your right/left" can confuse or panic a lot of people.

It's advisable to stick with saying it, but be aware that someone's thought process may be "what on my right"? Look right, drift while looking back over the shoulder, see fast approaching cyclist, panic, wobble, bang.

On the road or similar (bike path etc.) I usually stick with a simple 'bike up' or even shout 'bring bring' in the absence of a bell. There's a well established rule that on the road you ride on the left and overtake on the right so there's really no need to tell people what side you are passing on.

posted by Matt eaton [498 posts]
13th August 2014 - 14:55

3 Likes

OldRidgeback wrote:

It's not just the scooter kids. The parents need education too. I go to Stockwell skatepark here in London regularly with my son so we can ride our BMXs. My son started there young and even when he was small, quickly appreciated that there was an etiquette and that the skaters took some lines while the BMXers took others, so he knew where to keep an eye out. But there are plenty of parents who wander up with young kids, let them into the skatepark and then either wander off leaving them, or lounge around at the side, unaware their offspring are causing mayhem and also in quite a lot of danger.

We also get a lot of idiots turning up at the BMX track - walking their dogs on it, walking or jogging round it and using their radio controlled cars, even while we have training sessions running.

Very common problems; I've nearly hit dogs a couple of times as they run across the track.

Some parents seem to think that skateparks (and tracks for that matter) are playgrounds and just dump their kids there without supervision. It even happens at our local indoor. If the kid is old enough I usually try to talk to them and educate them about etiquette in a friendly way, most importantly about dangerous behaviour like hiding behind the jumpbox where no one can see them. If they are too young I might try to talk to the parents, but this doesn't usually help as they rarely want to listen.

Walkers and joggers - a few 'creative' near misses usually does the trick. Lots of skidding and cursing like you're in a panic and genuinly think you're going to hit them helps. You could try talking to them nicely but I wouldn't hold out too much hope if they haven't been able to work out what the track is for.

Radio contolled cars - squash 'em - done.

posted by Matt eaton [498 posts]
13th August 2014 - 15:10

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To the OP:
#1: You're the overtaking cyclist, it is entirely your responsibility to stay out of the way of the folk you are overtaking. If you have any doubt that they have registered your presence - shouting or no - you should slow down and give plenty of room. In essence - don't be a d!ck. (Isn't that rule #43?)
#2: Responding to @rseholes by being an @rsehole only increases the total amount of @rseholeness in the world. Every group contains a certain number of them - at least, with your confession here, I know the remainder of cycling is probably a little better off than I thought and, if I avoid you, my life will therefore be improved. Back to rule 43: don't be a d!ck.
#3: No-one is obligated, ever, to return your cheeriness, nor your fuckwittery. It sounds like you have been dealt the latter in spades. Chasing after someone, in *any* circumstance, and berating them for not returning what should have been a cheery salute is, frankly, psychopathological. Seek help. Oh, and try not to be such a d!ck.

adamthekiwi's picture

posted by adamthekiwi [61 posts]
13th August 2014 - 15:32

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Judging from those tales, it seems you have some major anger issues you need to deal with OP

I expect most people would be startled by having someone shout "Are you f*cking deaf" at them as loud as they could as they rode past. I rather hope it isn't something you make a habit of, as one day it'll be the wrong person you speak to like that, and it might not end up seeming like such a good idea.

posted by dp24 [195 posts]
13th August 2014 - 15:59

4 Likes

Matt eaton wrote:
OldRidgeback wrote:

It's not just the scooter kids. The parents need education too. I go to Stockwell skatepark here in London regularly with my son so we can ride our BMXs. My son started there young and even when he was small, quickly appreciated that there was an etiquette and that the skaters took some lines while the BMXers took others, so he knew where to keep an eye out. But there are plenty of parents who wander up with young kids, let them into the skatepark and then either wander off leaving them, or lounge around at the side, unaware their offspring are causing mayhem and also in quite a lot of danger.

We also get a lot of idiots turning up at the BMX track - walking their dogs on it, walking or jogging round it and using their radio controlled cars, even while we have training sessions running.

Very common problems; I've nearly hit dogs a couple of times as they run across the track.

Some parents seem to think that skateparks (and tracks for that matter) are playgrounds and just dump their kids there without supervision. It even happens at our local indoor. If the kid is old enough I usually try to talk to them and educate them about etiquette in a friendly way, most importantly about dangerous behaviour like hiding behind the jumpbox where no one can see them. If they are too young I might try to talk to the parents, but this doesn't usually help as they rarely want to listen.

Walkers and joggers - a few 'creative' near misses usually does the trick. Lots of skidding and cursing like you're in a panic and genuinly think you're going to hit them helps. You could try talking to them nicely but I wouldn't hold out too much hope if they haven't been able to work out what the track is for.

Radio contolled cars - squash 'em - done.

It sounds like we've had similar experiences. I did a few laps the other day and there were some idiot walkers strolling round the track looking at plants, despite the fact that there was me and a kid getting some speed up on our bikes.

Our coach said the same about radio controlled cars and that may apply to the small electric ones but you don't want to hit one of the larger, faster ones with a glow plug engine. There are tracks for radio controlled cars at Crystal Palace (one 'road circuit' and one 'off road') and I usually direct the guys with their toy cars there. I did receive a lot of abuse from one guy on one occasion and he was quite threatening, but his friend dragged him away. Luckily there are only a comparatively small number of short fuse f***wits in the world.

Will you be riding at the Brits by the way?

OldRidgeback

posted by OldRidgeback [2308 posts]
13th August 2014 - 16:01

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Matt Eaton. I agree 100% with your comments! Youngsters on scooters in skateparks are like swarms of locusts ; they're a pest beyond measure. But they pay to use the parks as much as the next person and so have every right to use them. More so in a lot of cases as their cash is keeping older parks from closing and enabling new ones to be built.

From experience everyone is capable of learning etiquette, but to learn it you have to teach it in a courteous manner. Shouting, balling and threatening tend to get you no where.

posted by Leeroy_Silk [58 posts]
13th August 2014 - 16:02

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Leeroy_Silk wrote:
Matt Eaton. I agree 100% with your comments! Youngsters on scooters in skateparks are like swarms of locusts ; they're a pest beyond measure. But they pay to use the parks as much as the next person and so have every right to use them. More so in a lot of cases as their cash is keeping older parks from closing and enabling new ones to be built.

From experience everyone is capable of learning etiquette, but to learn it you have to teach it in a courteous manner. Shouting, balling and threatening tend to get you no where.

Most of the skateparks I go to have the rock up and ride basis. The only one paying one I've used was the one in a shopping centre in Edinburgh - now closed and transformed into yet another Pizza Express sadly - my son misses the skatepark so much he says he won't ever go for a pizza there. I haven't been to the new site in Edinburgh.

I agree strongly about being courteous when you want to get a message across. Shouting at people is counter-productive.

OldRidgeback

posted by OldRidgeback [2308 posts]
13th August 2014 - 16:39

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oops - double post

OldRidgeback

posted by OldRidgeback [2308 posts]
13th August 2014 - 17:03

1 Like

Finally found this little gem also from the OP

Cyclist wrote:
I ride down the canal towpaths regularly, I shout from at least 100m then 50 etc on your left or right, if they make no attempt to move or move across into my line I don't move or slow down, if they do then I will always slow and say thanks. I don't blame kids under 10ish or dogs. A couple of summers ago I shouted at the top of my voice to a fisherman who had one of this great white fishing poles across the path I was well over 100m away he looked straight at me and carried on doing his thing, so I ran straight over his pole, lovely crack. I consider myself to be considerate to others in every way, however one chance is all you get as that is all I will get from a lorry.. However ref the headphones and walking, let's talk about idiotic cyclists who wear them..idiots, far more so than walkers on a canal towpath.

posted by freespirit1 [191 posts]
13th August 2014 - 20:07

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OldRidgeback wrote:
Luckily there are only a comparatively small number of short fuse f***wits in the world.

Oh, but I wish... there does seem to be a never-ending source of douchebags and dicks somewhere.

posted by jacknorell [576 posts]
13th August 2014 - 21:14

2 Likes

freespirit1 wrote:
Finally found this little gem also from the OP

Cyclist wrote:
I ride down the canal towpaths regularly, I shout from at least 100m then 50 etc on your left or right, if they make no attempt to move or move across into my line I don't move or slow down, if they do then I will always slow and say thanks. I don't blame kids under 10ish or dogs. A couple of summers ago I shouted at the top of my voice to a fisherman who had one of this great white fishing poles across the path I was well over 100m away he looked straight at me and carried on doing his thing, so I ran straight over his pole, lovely crack. I consider myself to be considerate to others in every way, however one chance is all you get as that is all I will get from a lorry.. However ref the headphones and walking, let's talk about idiotic cyclists who wear them..idiots, far more so than walkers on a canal towpath.

Wow... That certainly is a gem. He's as bad as the roadraging pricks in London*.

* Most drivers here are lovely, the bad ones just seem to be special.

posted by jacknorell [576 posts]
13th August 2014 - 21:16

2 Likes

freespirit1 wrote:
Finally found this little gem also from the OP

Cyclist wrote:
I ride down the canal towpaths regularly, I shout from at least 100m then 50 etc on your left or right, if they make no attempt to move or move across into my line I don't move or slow down, if they do then I will always slow and say thanks. I don't blame kids under 10ish or dogs. A couple of summers ago I shouted at the top of my voice to a fisherman who had one of this great white fishing poles across the path I was well over 100m away he looked straight at me and carried on doing his thing, so I ran straight over his pole, lovely crack. I consider myself to be considerate to others in every way, however one chance is all you get as that is all I will get from a lorry.. However ref the headphones and walking, let's talk about idiotic cyclists who wear them..idiots, far more so than walkers on a canal towpath.

I would very much like 'cyclist' to change their name on the basis of bad press they seem capable of delivering to all normal cyclists.
For one who likes to shout at the top of their voice, they now seem very quiet.
PS. You could have easily avoided the fishing rod by means of a simple bunny hop. Or did you laugh with glee at breaking someone's pride and joy?

posted by Leeroy_Silk [58 posts]
13th August 2014 - 22:03

3 Likes

I can't ride the Brits as I haven't done enough regionals this year due to family priorities (baby due anytime now). I'm hoping to make it to the South West champs, depending when the baby actually arrives.

I do actually have a little sympathy for the RC car folks. Where we are there are no specific facilities for modelists at all and I've got no objection to them using the tracks at times when there is nobody riding on them, as long as they leave promptly as soon as anyone arrives on a bike.

posted by Matt eaton [498 posts]
14th August 2014 - 10:20

4 Likes

Jeez.

A life long cyclist ? You don't sound like one.

Those people riding 3 up were nobs. As where you cutting in on them.

Shouting on your right ? Seriously ? I've never said that outside of racing.

Omg - someone didn't wave to you ? Nobody is obliged. He might have been thinking of a cute to cancer or something important.

You need to relax.

posted by fenix [80 posts]
14th August 2014 - 11:03

4 Likes

Matt eaton wrote:
I can't ride the Brits as I haven't done enough regionals this year due to family priorities (baby due anytime now). I'm hoping to make it to the South West champs, depending when the baby actually arrives.

I do actually have a little sympathy for the RC car folks. Where we are there are no specific facilities for modelists at all and I've got no objection to them using the tracks at times when there is nobody riding on them, as long as they leave promptly as soon as anyone arrives on a bike.

Good luck when the baby comes, no1?

Did you ride at the Brits in 2013 or 2013? Me and my son did those too. One lad I know here in London is going to Uni in Cornwall so he can be near all those great South West tracks. I did like the Cheddar track - pity it's gone now.

We've radio controlled car tracks at Crystal Palace plus there's a cinder base football pitch near our club track that's little used by footballers and where the modelists can go. The cars do kick up the surface of the track, particularly the more powerful glow plug engine ones and there is a sign by the track saying it's for BMX bikes only.

You're no relation of Michelle Eaton who rides cruiser are you?

OldRidgeback

posted by OldRidgeback [2308 posts]
14th August 2014 - 14:13

1 Like

Cheers, baby no.2.

I only started racing BMX last year aged 29 (not a good age to start as the 17-29 experts are very fast and competitive so I did the season as a novice) so I haven't raced at anything other than regional and club races. I've riden double-bike this year to try to get some more race experience and hopefully will be racing a lot more next year and would like to be a bit more organised about practicing/riding the track the day/week before the race. I find turning up at a track that you've never seen and trying to get your head around it in practice very hard.

You're right about the cars kicking up the track surface but at most of the open-access tracks around here (certainly my local play track) there's a lot of use by kids on bikes of all sorts who enjoy nothing more than skidding all over the place and wrecking the surface. I don't blame them as they don't know any better but any damage from the few RC cars we might see pales into insignificance. If there were a lot of them I can imagine it being a bit of a problem.

posted by Matt eaton [498 posts]
14th August 2014 - 14:17

2 Likes

Matt eaton wrote:
Cheers, baby no.2.

I only started racing BMX last year aged 29 (not a good age to start as the 17-29 experts are very fast and competitive so I did the season as a novice) so I haven't raced at anything other than regional and club races. I've riden double-bike this year to try to get some more race experience and hopefully will be racing a lot more next year and would like to be a bit more organised about practicing/riding the track the day/week before the race. I find turning up at a track that you've never seen and trying to get your head around it in practice very hard.

You're right about the cars kicking up the track surface but at most of the open-access tracks around here (certainly my local play track) there's a lot of use by kids on bikes of all sorts who enjoy nothing more than skidding all over the place and wrecking the surface. I don't blame them as they don't know any better but any damage from the few RC cars we might see pales into insignificance. If there were a lot of them I can imagine it being a bit of a problem.

Yep, 17-29 is fast and furious. It's competitive with us old boys in 45+ as well tho. I have a 20" but only race on cruiser. I did think about entering for 20" veterans at the Brits but the guys in that class are younger, faster and more skilled than me so there's little point really.

If me and my son get down to the SW for a race I'll send you a message.

OldRidgeback

posted by OldRidgeback [2308 posts]
14th August 2014 - 15:41

2 Likes

OldRidgeBack and Matt Eaton. We should start a thread to see how many BMXers there are who also ride road. Be interesting to see if riding road helps with BMX racing.
I race masters have qualified for the Brits so should be there in a couple weeks time.

posted by Leeroy_Silk [58 posts]
14th August 2014 - 15:47

2 Likes

Leeroy_Silk wrote:
OldRidgeBack and Matt Eaton. We should start a thread to see how many BMXers there are who also ride road. Be interesting to see if riding road helps with BMX racing.
I race masters have qualified for the Brits so should be there in a couple weeks time.

I don't think that there are a huge number of us, but there's definately a cross-over. I know a couple of younger BMXers (freestyle not race) who enjoy a bit of road action too.

As to whether or not riding road helps with BMX - definately. I see some guys who look like they are about to expire after crossing the finish line in BMX races but I rarely feel this way (CX races are a different story). Folks in the BMX scene have even commented on my stamina on race day (nutrition has a part to play too and riding road teaches us about this). Riding road can increase speed and power, especially if you like to attack climbs. My roadie is fixed gear which I think also helps with leg speed (from spinning like mad on descents) and power for gate starts (riding up hills in a gear that's 'too high'). BMX is probably more closely alligned to track (velodrome) riding but any on-bike time helps.

It goes the other way too, the bike control learnt from BMX makes you generally more confident on the road and for CX is about the only thing I've got going for me. It feels good when you can keep up with the race leaders through a technical section and feel like they're holding you up, even if they have just lapped you and promptly drop you when it opens up again.

Good luck at the Brits to both of you.

posted by Matt eaton [498 posts]
14th August 2014 - 16:28

3 Likes

OldRidgeback wrote:
You're no relation of Michelle Eaton who rides cruiser are you?

Not related, but I have met her and raced with her - and lost

posted by Matt eaton [498 posts]
15th August 2014 - 8:00

2 Likes

Leeroy_Silk wrote:
OldRidgeBack and Matt Eaton. We should start a thread to see how many BMXers there are who also ride road. Be interesting to see if riding road helps with BMX racing.
I race masters have qualified for the Brits so should be there in a couple weeks time.

I'll keep an eye out for you then. I'm racing cruiser and it's my wife's birthday on the 24th so I'll only be there on the 23rd but we can maybe meet up in the morning of the 23rd. I'll be doing a training session there next week to re-familiarise myself with the track. The high start hill and challenging first jump are tricky and I've seen several riders better than me crash out there.

I'm riding for the South Region. What about you?

OldRidgeback

posted by OldRidgeback [2308 posts]
15th August 2014 - 8:10

2 Likes

Matt eaton wrote:
OldRidgeback wrote:
You're no relation of Michelle Eaton who rides cruiser are you?

Not related, but I have met her and raced with her - and lost

Aha, she beat me too plus one of the lads from my club. No shame in that as she's very quick.

OldRidgeback

posted by OldRidgeback [2308 posts]
15th August 2014 - 8:11

2 Likes

I'm never embarrased about getting beaten by a girl. There are plenty of them out there faster than me and unless you are an elite rider it would be daft to think otherwise.

posted by Matt eaton [498 posts]
15th August 2014 - 10:25

4 Likes

OP, yes, it's all your problem. Deal with it.

I was told there would be Cake. Luckily there's http://TestValleyCC.org.uk

KiwiMike's picture

posted by KiwiMike [628 posts]
15th August 2014 - 10:33

5 Likes

You sound like an incredibly angry cyclist.

1) Although it can be inadvisable, there are no laws regarding the use of earphones while you're cycling. If you're overtaking someone, do it with caution. What if the guy actually was deaf? Would you have roared past him shouting expletives at him? Have some common courtesy.

2) I've got to admit that these annoy me too. Not what they're wearing, of course, because mentioning that only makes you come across like an elitist. Maybe next time, instead of speeding up, slow down and explain what was wrong with them doing that. That way, maybe next time they'll be more courteous because someone was kind enough to point out the error of their ways.

3) Heaven forbid someone not acknowledge your presence. You're not the bloody queen, so don't act like it. So he didn't wave back, what's the problem. The most I'd do is think "that was a little rude" and then get back to cycling. There's not a chance on this Earth that I'd then turn around and be so confrontational because the guy didn't wave! More often than not, I don't wave at people but just smile and/or say good morning/afternoon. If someone didn't see/hear me and came to have a go at me, I'd just laugh in their face.

Although two of the three things you mentioned can be annoying, your attitude towards them and your subsequent actions made you come across as a dick and that's the lasting image that those people will have of you. Calm down.

posted by StuartJJones [3 posts]
15th August 2014 - 23:05

5 Likes