Punctured inner tubes, proper repair?

by blablablacksheep20   February 6, 2014  

Been gathering a few inner tubes lately that have been punctured and wondering whats best way to repair them?

I use Parktool patch kit for quick repairs but they dont last very long at all.

So suggestons please as it getting costly if i keep fitting new ones inside.

thnx

22 user comments

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Old fashioned patch and glue works fine for me, just rough the edges up with the file thing, and allow the glue to part dry before applying.

Although Tesco are doing 'em for £2 a shot it's hardly worth the effort.

Shamblesuk's picture

posted by Shamblesuk [140 posts]
6th February 2014 - 15:38

110 Likes

An increasingly popular solution around Surrey seems to be to throw the punctured tube in a hedge and stick a new one on... Angry

As ShamblesUK says the old fashioned glue and proper rubbery patch seems to work for me, although have found the lezyne sticky-back quick patches work quite well

posted by chris75018 [101 posts]
6th February 2014 - 16:20

106 Likes

Park have always been fine for me, I have a tube with 2 or 3 patches that has been going for years. You using the sandpaper first, right?

posted by andyp [1331 posts]
6th February 2014 - 16:29

107 Likes

I've had no problems with the Park ones, but if I was doing it at home I'd use old-fashioned glue-and-patches ones. If they're done properly they're as good as a new tube IMO.

posted by Chuck [464 posts]
6th February 2014 - 16:32

112 Likes

Old fashioned patch and glue works best for a lasting repair. Went through a phase of only using a new inner tube but am now using repaired tubes which are lasting well. Kind of see the patches as an 'on road' repair if you get a 2nd puncture.
Somewhat 'bad form' that some people throw their old inners into the bushes in Surrey (akin to a motorist dumping rubbish out of his window). Given the recent news that some events were cancelled, potentially due to local opposition, perhaps they aren't helping their cause much.

Shades

posted by Shades [255 posts]
7th February 2014 - 12:28

108 Likes

'Somewhat 'bad form' that some people throw their old inners into the bushes in Surrey '

not just Surrey. Seen this a lot. Even worse if you visit any trail centre! Idiots...

posted by andyp [1331 posts]
7th February 2014 - 12:42

109 Likes

http://www.probikekit.co.uk/bicycle-tyre-tubular-accessories/rema-tip-to...

You can bulk buy patches and get the adhesive separately as well and away you go. Surely the absolute bare minimum of any tools you should have.

monkeytrousers's picture

posted by monkeytrousers [65 posts]
7th February 2014 - 14:32

111 Likes

chris75018 wrote:
An increasingly popular solution around Surrey seems to be to throw the punctured tube in a hedge and stick a new one on... Angry
l

Really - never seen one.... although I see empty gel packs all the time which frustrates me...

posted by andycoventry [120 posts]
7th February 2014 - 15:17

107 Likes

andycoventry wrote:
chris75018 wrote:
An increasingly popular solution around Surrey seems to be to throw the punctured tube in a hedge and stick a new one on... Angry
l

Really - never seen one.... although I see empty gel packs all the time which frustrates me...

..... particularly when every gel tube contains exactly enough energy to roll it up and stuff it in your back pocket!

Mike

mike the bike's picture

posted by mike the bike [308 posts]
7th February 2014 - 19:24

113 Likes

I carry self adhesive patches with me all the time and find them easy and quick to use. One tube has lasted me for years with a couple of these on it. I also carry a spare tube as well for when time is important.

[URL=http://veloviewer.com/athlete/3303236/][/URL

posted by Nat Jas Moe [66 posts]
7th February 2014 - 19:36

108 Likes

Carry a spare tube, self-adhesive patches for by the roadside. When I get home I do a proper old fashioned repair.

Also carried under seat are a chain-tool, spare split-links and a pair of nitrile disposable gloves (Why get covered in muck if you don't have to!).

posted by levermonkey [520 posts]
7th February 2014 - 19:47

112 Likes

monkeytrousers wrote:
http://www.probikekit.co.uk/bicycle-tyre-tubular-accessories/rema-tip-top-tt04-puncture-repair-kit/10779755.html?utm_source=googleprod&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=gp_cycling&affil=thggpsad&switchcurrency=GBP&gclid=CIKKjuuPurwCFWjKtAodHiwAUQ

You can bulk buy patches and get the adhesive separately as well and away you go. Surely the absolute bare minimum of any tools you should have.

cool, will look into getting some of them, most my patchs(park) dont have the glue so i do doubt them esp when i find they leak air quite a lot.
i do sandpaper them yes

posted by blablablacksheep20 [54 posts]
7th February 2014 - 20:59

107 Likes

Patches and glue? Old fashioned? Luxury!

In my day, we have a kit with a little clamp, and patches backed with metal and a burnable substance, which you lit and let them melt the patch on. Those repairs lasted for ever.

+1 for nitrile gloves - especially if you have white bar tape. Cool

Also in kit: Spare derailleur hanger.

drmatthewhardy's picture

posted by drmatthewhardy [531 posts]
7th February 2014 - 21:28

109 Likes

Lighter fluid instead of file/sandpaper to prep the tube for the rubber cement.

harman_mogul's picture

posted by harman_mogul [182 posts]
8th February 2014 - 18:18

110 Likes

Any idea where I can get bulk buys of patches. I did have a bag of 100 but suddenly they were all gone.
Alright after 10 years maybe.

posted by mattsccm [292 posts]
8th February 2014 - 22:42

110 Likes
Simon E's picture

posted by Simon E [2248 posts]
9th February 2014 - 0:50

112 Likes

Simon E wrote:
ebay?

Rema TipTop F0 (16mm) in 100s:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/161219712461
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/271354267622

I use 16mm patches on my 25c tubes, anything else is too big IMHO. I used a Park SA patch in the past but it only lasted till I got home so served it's purpose but due to my failings it put me off them. I carry two tubes, of the right length valve, in my pannier bag.

Redvee's picture

posted by Redvee [135 posts]
9th February 2014 - 12:03

109 Likes

Lezyne Smart Puncture Repair kit. Six robust rubber patches that adhere to the tube very quickly and don't crinkle up like some less substantial on offer. I would recommend them and they (so far at least) have fixed the puncture as effectively as a traditional glue puncture kit.

posted by Team Rux [21 posts]
10th February 2014 - 11:11

102 Likes

I carry a spare new tube, a spare patched tube, and a minimalistic patch kit. Yes - I've had two punctures on one ride. I would only patch a tube a second time to get home. I cut up my old tubes and find other uses for the bits. A small section with the valve is useful when putting new rim strips on wheels (to hold it so the hole aligns properly).

People who discard punctured tubes improperly should be prosecuted the same as other low-life litterers. I pick up any old tubes I find on my rides (not many in may area) and take them home. I know one bike shop that has a "ball" of old tubes about a metre in diameter Smile

Ride your own ride

posted by CanAmSteve [212 posts]
10th February 2014 - 17:49

104 Likes

I'm of the adage "3 strikes and out" and sometimes you just get an unlucky tube!!!

gagsyk's picture

posted by gagsyk [2 posts]
10th February 2014 - 21:39

102 Likes

On the road, I carry a spare tube and a Parktool patch kit.

I was also using patch and glue once at home before.

I have find that patch work better with some brand of inner tube and not as well with other. Rubber type and quality is determinant. Prepping the tube with solvent help to do a stronger bond.
Even with those in consideration, patch from time to time unglued, specially when the hole is big. Some patch are often very tick and the tube lose flexibility. If you have a ridge on the tube near the hole, than your in trouble.

Since I like to by expensive ultralight tube, and I dont like to trow them away, I came with this solution, to permanently repair tube once at home.

Step one: Clean the tube with VC-100 solvent (find in plumbing department of hardware store, its used to clean PVC, ABS pipe before gluing). Rubber will get soft and a bit sticky.

Step 2 ; Coat the hole and around with GOOP for shoes repair or E-6000 glue. (They several variant of GOOP glue, but I have not try the other). A 1 mm max coat will work. Dont go to tick or the tube will lose some flexibility. Let dry over night. Once dry the patch tube remain flexible. Its impossible to remove the glue with your nail. Kiss

If the hole is very big, cut a piece of rubber from an old tube, clean tube and patch with solvent and glue them together. Clamp the patch for 24 h at least.

For off road repair, this approach seems the best solution. Note that I have not done more than few week on the road repairs tube but I am confident that they should last forever.

I have also repair damage road tire by gluing 2 layers of fiber cloth and GOOP glue by inside the tire. It have last over a year now (front tire) and staring is second season.

posted by SL06 [1 posts]
9th June 2014 - 16:43

1 Like

I've never had a problem patching,musing lezyne, rema, halfords,whatever.

I know tubes are very cheap now, but that probably means they're made under poor working conditions, plus, it's not very green to throw away one that's repairable.

All Campag

posted by Flying Scot [803 posts]
9th June 2014 - 21:21

2 Likes