Hydrophobic Spray

by Scoob_84   January 29, 2014  

Cycling to work though the rain this morning got my me musing over the possibility of using hydrophobic spray to treat my mid-priced soggy DHB bib tights into something that could perform like the more expensive castelli nanoflex garments. My main gripe with cycling in winter rain is the cold wet feeling on my exposed thighs. Remembering something I watched a few weeks ago on some gadget show on the telli where hydrophobic spray was used to waterproof everyday items making them impervious to stains and water, I wondered if maybe if I could simply by a £10 can of the stuff and turn my bibs into high performance, exotic cycle gear. Hydrophobic spray covers stuff in tiny little nano rods which are so close together that water droplets don’t touch the fabric and simple bead up and fall off. Sounds good, so long as these nano-rod things don’t get in the way of breathability, but the show didn’t mention that.

Anyway, I’m tempted to take the plunge and try it out for myself, but before doing so I want to ask if anyone here has tried this yet? If so what were the results? Does it affect the breathability of fabric? Does the water proofing work on stretched lycra? etc

23 user comments

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The info on Crep Protect states that it lasts "up to 2 weeks", probably a lot less if you're washing your clothing regularly!

Twitter: @velosam

SamShaw's picture

posted by SamShaw [269 posts]
29th January 2014 - 12:33

2 Likes

It wouldn't last a single wash D Oh

posted by Scoob_84 [214 posts]
29th January 2014 - 12:40

2 Likes

What have you got against hydros?

Hydrophobe. Big Grin

posted by allez neg [4 posts]
29th January 2014 - 12:54

2 Likes

You could try something like this:

http://www.snowandrock.com/grangers-30-degrees-proofer-300ml-bottle/clot...

Seems to work ok on re-waterproofing my snowboard stuff - although it probably needed to be waterproof in the first place.

posted by andycoventry [120 posts]
29th January 2014 - 13:18

2 Likes

Not tried it, but I can't wait for Neverwet to come to market - the demo videos of that are crazy. I'll be able to buy a pair of nice white sparkling trainers (an indeed cycling shoes!) without being broken-hearted at the first sign of dirt.

Last night I would have considered trading a very loud baby for a really nice bike.

posted by notfastenough [3329 posts]
29th January 2014 - 13:41

2 Likes

more on the stuff, just need to find the right product that can withstand my washing machine

http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2013-06/super-hydrophobic-spray-ma...

posted by Scoob_84 [214 posts]
29th January 2014 - 13:43

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This is the stuff i want, not the usual water repellent spray.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/superhydrophobic-spray-neverwe...

posted by Scoob_84 [214 posts]
29th January 2014 - 14:58

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Scoob_84 wrote:
This is the stuff i want, not the usual water repellent spray.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/superhydrophobic-spray-neverwet-enters-us-market-in-a-20-can-8668784.html

I am thinking of trying neverwet but not on clothes, on my bike.



Suffering from Low Cadence.

bikeboy76's picture

posted by bikeboy76 [1349 posts]
29th January 2014 - 23:40

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Are your dhb tights already DWR treated? I've used Nikwax TX.Direct treatment that you just dump into the liquid softener chute in the washer for my technical gear to replenish their water repellency but not sure if it would work as well for untreated clothes. I *think* it would because the DWR finish gets washed off over time and what you're doing with the Nikwax is reapplying the DWR but maybe the fabric has to have a special substrate for the DWR to stick to first? The nice thing is it's definitely made to maintain breathability so wouldn't turn your kit into a steam suit. It might not hurt to contact Nikwax and see what they think. Here's a link to the Nikwax TX.Direct webpage just in case http://www.nikwax-usa.com/en-us/products/productdetail.php?productid=267

Melancholy is incompatible with bicycling. ~James E. Starrs

movingtarget's picture

posted by movingtarget [135 posts]
29th January 2014 - 23:54

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Do as the pro's do and rub dollop of vaseline in to your thighs, knees and shins.

It makes it harder for the water to penetrate the skin, thus keeping you a touch warmer.

The only drawback i have found is that the road grime does stick to your legs a bit more.

posted by Martyn_K [47 posts]
30th January 2014 - 11:05

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Martyn_K wrote:
Do as the pro's do and rub dollop of vaseline in to your thighs, knees and shins.

Can't see that helping my morning routine - note the OP was asking about cycling to work, not all-day pro riding.

Personally on rainy days i supplement my bib tights with a cheap pair of "waterproof" overtrousers - the dirt-cheap basic ones scrunch up nicely to fit in the bottom of a pannier until you need them. Doesn't look very pro but keeps >90% of the rain off, so you stay warm.

PJ McNally's picture

posted by PJ McNally [591 posts]
30th January 2014 - 12:08

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I have Sportful no rain bibs. Waste of time - they stop rain for all of 2 minutes. I'm going to buy a pair of proper waterproof trousers come payday, I'm sick of being soaking wet and I don't care anymore that I don't look like a so called proper cyclist!

posted by dunnoh [176 posts]
30th January 2014 - 13:51

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Aside from not looking Pro, the other significant trouble with waterproof trousers is breathibility and boiling up! And as usual with his game, you have to part with a wedge of cash if you want waterproof and breathable clobber.

I think I'll continue just getting wet legs when it rains and toughen up a bit.

posted by Scoob_84 [214 posts]
30th January 2014 - 16:18

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bikeboy76 wrote:
Scoob_84 wrote:
This is the stuff i want, not the usual water repellent spray.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/superhydrophobic-spray-neverwet-enters-us-market-in-a-20-can-8668784.html

I am thinking of trying neverwet but not on clothes, on my bike.

This stuff looks great, but having read user reviews yesterday on amazon.com, there are a few downsides. Its gives your everthing a rubbery feel, it attracts dust, you can't wash the dust off because water doesn't come into contact with it, the nano stuff rubs off easily and easily washes off with the use of detergent. Other than that its ace.

Didn't think about using it on the bike though, that could be a great idea.

posted by Scoob_84 [214 posts]
30th January 2014 - 16:23

3 Likes

Scoob_84 wrote:
Aside from not looking Pro, the other significant trouble with waterproof trousers is breathibility and boiling up! And as usual with his game, you have to part with a wedge of cash if you want waterproof and breathable clobber.

I think I'll continue just getting wet legs when it rains and toughen up a bit.

I commute 5 days a week in Manchester and although the gabba is standing up OK in the rain, my legs are so cold and wet that I've ended up with pneumonia resulting from a particularly awful mornings commute. I have a pair of gortex walking trousers that I will try for size and see how I get on

posted by dunnoh [176 posts]
30th January 2014 - 21:37

2 Likes

How about wearing tights without bibs over your summer shorts, then you'd have two layers over your thighs.

posted by GREGJONES [127 posts]
30th January 2014 - 22:00

2 Likes

I have a pair of Endura Thermolite tights and find them very good for 8 mile winter commute even in heavy rain which we have had lot of lately, this winter has been quite mild here in London but last winter I was riding in them at -9. They go through the washing machine every couple of days but are are still good after countless washes though slightly faded.

posted by fernlyn [2 posts]
30th January 2014 - 22:40

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How a set of Rainlegs, designed for just this very thing. Reviewed by roadcc http://road.cc/content/review/56364-rainlegs-wind-and-waterproof-leg-covers.

I have a set and they work well.

posted by FMOAB [235 posts]
31st January 2014 - 1:46

0 Likes

I need something for commuting too - damn this wet january.

As I wear normal cloths to ride in, the ideal would have been the Hincapie rain pants, which scrunch down small, are tapered in the leg and would be slingable over my jeans. But those seemed to come and go within a season, before I could buy them. Damnit.
The Showers Pass trousers, similar taper but heavier, look like they might do the job, but I think they'd be too hot over the top of my jeans.
Damnit.

posted by bashthebox [647 posts]
31st January 2014 - 9:42

1 Like

allez neg wrote:
What have you got against hydros?

Hydrophobe. Big Grin

Could be rabies!

OldRidgeback

posted by OldRidgeback [2242 posts]
31st January 2014 - 11:12

1 Like

If you haven't tried them, mudguards are really useful in the rain, stopping loads of surface water spray up onto your legs

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posted by David Arthur [1612 posts]
31st January 2014 - 11:32

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+1 on full winter mudguards, most of the wet comes from spray off the road and bike, its also full of crap (not necessarily literally, but sometimes ). This winter has been brutal for the bikes, so mudguards help there too.

posted by lolol [122 posts]
31st January 2014 - 12:46

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+2 on mudguards, they stay on my commuter/#2 bike all through the year and consider them an essential bit of kit. I like a rapid commute as much as the next guy and the thought fixing what is effectively a parachute to my bike put me off them for way longer than it really should have, and making do with those ugly mountain bike mud guards that clip onto your seat post and deflect all the road s**t all over my bike.

But having taken the plunge on some crud roadracers I barely notice them, even when going flat out. Most importantly they keep the crap off the road building up over my nice shiny break callipers.

I think i have everything covered for wet weather. The rain coat, mud guards, overshoes, gloves, peak hat under the helmet....its just the legs, which isn't really that much of an issue.

posted by Scoob_84 [214 posts]
31st January 2014 - 13:05

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