Should bike shops become collection points for on line sales?

by Neil753   December 6, 2013  

It sounds daft, maybe even galling, but would this work for the mutual benefit of everyone? This is my argument.

People are getting used to picking up their on line purchases at high street "collection points". But would you trust your local corner shop to take care of that fragile delivery? Maybe not.

But what if you addressed your parcel c/o your LBS, and they charged you a quid?

It gives you an excuse to grab a free coffee, hang out with other cyclists, and get support from your LBS to maybe fit the part, while you wait, for a reasonable fee.

And it gives the LBS a chance to earn an extra quid, perhaps dozens of times each week, picking up extra shop sales, some more workshop income, and a chance to build their presence in the community.

Ok, a disgruntled LBS proprietor, determined to ignore the rise and rise of on line sales, might be aghast at the idea, but enlightened entrepreneurs might see my idea as an interesting one. And one that could help save the traditional LBS that we all love, but hardly visit anymore.

Opinions wanted please.

31 user comments

Latest 30 commentsNewest firstBest ratedAll

there might be something in the concept of a 'stockless' shop taking in parts ordered online and charging for fitting but as a service offered by a LBS that makes its income from retail it sounds like signing your own death warrant.

joemmo's picture

posted by joemmo [822 posts]
6th December 2013 - 14:12

9 Likes

I work in urban planning, and we worked on a plan for a new district of Chicago, where most of the shops were stockless, and essentially showroom only. Customers could go in and examine new bits and bobs, and if they bought them, they would be delivered from high-tech logistics warehouses on the edge of the district. What this meant was that big lorry deliveries were kept off the streets, making the shopping experience nicer and the streets safer; the retail spaces were more productive (more selling space, less storage space); the shoppers didn't need to carry around bags of stuff (leaving them more opportunity to partake in some other leisure activity in the town, which is good for them, and the economy); and deliveries were coordinated, by smartphone, to be at your house at a time you wanted anyway. Everyone wins! But it is an easier solution when you are proposing it for an entire district, and ALL its shops. Then it is THEIR stuff being sold still. It might be a tougher sell for LBS owners if they are only getting a quid... however you might get them to become part of the "wiggle network" or the "chain reaction network", and should a customer choose them as the delivery site they get a % of the total sale (and the potential for the labour of installing the part). Because the alternative, of having LBSs become stockless, and selling things online like Wiggle and Chain Reaction still wouldn't work, because the scale of those web businesses and their lack of bricks and mortar costs must make them nigh on impossible to undercut on price. So it becomes an "if you can't beat em, join em". And what is in it for Wiggle and CRC? Well, access to a market of loyal LBS customers who hitherto would not deign to shop online.

posted by Mikeduff [24 posts]
6th December 2013 - 14:41

11 Likes

Joemmo
Wouldn't work for me. I refuse to buy things like furniture if I can't take it with me. I want to swap cash for parts. Delivery to me is a bad thing not a good thing. In fact its the very opposite of what a good shopping trip should be.
It would be a as bad as mail order where you pay for something then it doesn't turn up or it isn't in stock despite the magic lantern saying it is. If you have it in your hand you know you have it. If you can't get it you haven't parted with your money and you can buy an alternative if you want.

posted by mattsccm [259 posts]
9th December 2013 - 8:38

5 Likes

joemmo wrote:
there might be something in the concept of a 'stockless' shop taking in parts ordered online...

This seems to be happening already on the high street... All I wanted was a new pair of size 9 DC's tried all the usual shops; Schuh, Two Seasons, T'reds, Office, etc all of them said the same thing... we don't have your size in stock but you can order them through the internet!

After trawling round shops all saturday afternoon my blood was beginning to boil... So your internet warehouse has them in stock? why don't you order them in to your bloody shop so customers can try a pair of trainers and walk out with a bag and pair of frigging trainers...you know like a shop.

William Black's picture

posted by William Black [196 posts]
9th December 2013 - 11:16

7 Likes

Sounds like a good idea actually.

The other benefit to the LBS is that it reduces their cash tied up in inventory - it's difficult for them to deal with the big brands anyway, who prefer retailers to go deep into one brand rather than spread themselves across a range. But of course the customer wants to compare and contrast.

Also makes returns potentially easier, and gives the LBS a chance to see what people are buying or upsell them on other products.

abudhabiChris's picture

posted by abudhabiChris [529 posts]
9th December 2013 - 13:08

6 Likes

It would be great for the customer to combine the price and variety of online with the service of local... unclear value for the LBS as they would do more labour and build customer relations but make fewer bike sales... I fail to see what value is in it for the online businesses though? They wouldn't want your head to be turned if they can meet your needs in full.

posted by chokofingrz [287 posts]
9th December 2013 - 14:01

5 Likes

chokofingrz wrote:
It would be great for the customer to combine the price and variety of online with the service of local... unclear value for the LBS as they would do more labour and build customer relations but make fewer bike sales... I fail to see what value is in it for the online businesses though? They wouldn't want your head to be turned if they can meet your needs in full.
I think the advantage for the LBS is increased profit from labour, greater public awareness, and ancilliary sales.
I agree, they wouldn't want heads turned, but there's no law that says you can only have parts delivered to your home address. No special agreement has to be reached.
I'm guessing that on line sellers won't make things "difficult" for customers using their LBS as the delivery address.

"Hey..... Let's be visible out there."

Neil753's picture

posted by Neil753 [451 posts]
9th December 2013 - 14:56

7 Likes

So.

You buy some parts from ABC Trading*, who claim that they are genuine bits and they will fit your bike, who send them to your LBS who have agreed to fit them at an agreed price.

Bits arrive and they are not what you wanted or they are faulty.

Someone now has to sort out the problem. The LBS aren't going to do it as they aren't making any money from the parts so why should they waste their time and anyway they didn't source the parts. So it's up to you. You have to go to the shop, inspect the parts, have a conversation with the mechanic/manager/work-experience assistant, contact the seller, argue about the problems, get the shop to speak to the seller, get the items returned, get some new ones and try to get the LBS to do it all a second time for the agreed bit of money to fit them.

Will you re-imburse your LBS for their wasted time? Probably not, and you wonder why they baulked at the idea in the first place.

This is a classic problem in the car servicing/repair business and why most garages won't let you supply the parts, oil etc. Not only do they not make any profit from the parts they're expected to deal with problems their fitting and subsequent use produce and to do it for free and with a smile.

Buy your 'over-priced' bits at the LBS and admit that perhaps just once in a while you'll have to pay full price for something.

* ABC Trading is a fictional name intended to protect the guilty and the innocent.

Did Nightrider 2013 and 2014 for Parkinson's UK. Might just have one last go in 2015.

jova54's picture

posted by jova54 [619 posts]
9th December 2013 - 18:15

8 Likes

Pretty awful to read some of these comments. I fail to see how a local bike shop can afford to run a business with this? Especially when you have staff, mechanics etc to employ. Also, a stockless bikeshop, as mooted by some here, is a terrible idea. What about test rides before you buy?

I'm happy to support my local bike shop, even if it means paying (often only very little) more. The service and help I've received for free far outweighs the money I might have saved.

Even going by the original poster's "Dozens of sales" at a quid each, its still likely to be barely enough to pay a single member of staff for a day.

posted by giobox [284 posts]
9th December 2013 - 18:29

10 Likes

@jova54 - sound interesting points, especially the one about car parts.

I'm guessing that if the on-line retailer did ship the wrong parts it would give the B&M retailer the opportunity to demonstrate their superior knowledge, and their ability to sort out the problem at cost to the customer, which is only fair. If the shop is charging ex amount per hour, it's easy to include any diagnosis and admin in the amount of time for the total job, just like any other tradesman would do.

But, from personal experience, I know that LBS staff have also been known to get parts mixed up from time to time, especially "fish and chipper" bike shops with owners that fail to keep pace with technological developments. And I suspect that applies to many of the new breed of rider too, who may have inadvertently ordered the wrong parts themselves.

"Hey..... Let's be visible out there."

Neil753's picture

posted by Neil753 [451 posts]
9th December 2013 - 19:27

7 Likes

giobox wrote:
Pretty awful to read some of these comments. I fail to see how a local bike shop can afford to run a business with this? Especially when you have staff, mechanics etc to employ. Also, a stockless bikeshop, as mooted by some here, is a terrible idea. What about test rides before you buy?

I'm happy to support my local bike shop, even if it means paying (often only very little) more. The service and help I've received for free far outweighs the money I might have saved.

Even going by the original poster's "Dozens of sales" at a quid each, its still likely to be barely enough to pay a single member of staff for a day.

.

The idea of a stockless shop is mentioned by one poster is is an interesting concept but, if you go the other way, I know of many bike shops that are unnecessarily large, paying a fortune in business rates, energy consumption, insurance, staffing and stockholding, trying to cover the demands of an increasingly savvy market.

Participating in what would effectively be a "just in time" supply chain, could dramatically increase the profit per square foot, especially if it encouraged footfall that the LBS would never otherwise see.

Certainly an interesting topic, and it sounds like you know your stuff, so many thanks for the comments.

"Hey..... Let's be visible out there."

Neil753's picture

posted by Neil753 [451 posts]
9th December 2013 - 19:51

8 Likes

I would rather stick a spoke through my eye. If you dont own/run a bikeshop, you have no idea how exepensive it is to do so. Everything costs, everything. The profit bit comes after several years of hard graft. So the thought of becoming a collection point for the very thing that threatens every ibd is absurd. Yes, we are workin hard on plans for next year to reduce the growing effect on sales, and no, i didnt go into business expecting it to be easy.

posted by cristiansupernova [6 posts]
10th December 2013 - 0:28

10 Likes

My LBS in Wareham do offer a service in checking assemby of bikes ordered online; my last two visits to them for adjustments to bottom bracket and disc rotor have cost precisely £5 each- people who love bikes and provide a good service.

New Forester

posted by Forester [86 posts]
10th December 2013 - 6:35

6 Likes

I like the idea in principle, indeed I've e-mailed my LBS several times already asking for various things to be ordered and colleced them several days later, of course the danger of doing that is that you end up paying full RRP, not a concern if it's a pound or two but anymore than that then quite frankly i'd rather the money in my own pocket.

For instance I'm buying a set of 4 Seasons soon, £44 RRP, £30 online with free delivery, I'd rather buy the tyres online and spend the rest in the shop.

posted by thebungle [115 posts]
10th December 2013 - 9:14

5 Likes

CycleSurgery do Click and Collect and Pricematch..... plus they have actual shops with workshops...

But seriously, this business model wouldn't work. Most LBS can order parts at your request if they have good relationships with the suppliers, they just can't offer the low price wiggle et al does due to overheads (IE Hiring a Mechanic, having a physical premises).

If you want cheap parts, get in the trade, otherwise accept that real shops cost money but have a quality that can never be replaced by a internet site. A good shop will have great service and expert knowledge, if you find one like that then support it cause they need you.

posted by Nzlucas [89 posts]
10th December 2013 - 10:02

8 Likes

Nzlucas wrote:
accept that real shops cost money but have a quality that can never be replaced by a internet site.

Unfortunately this is increasingly rare, IME anyway.

Still, I don't see how this would be a goer for an LBS at all.

posted by Chuck [381 posts]
10th December 2013 - 10:37

8 Likes

@ cristiansupernova - No, I don't run a bike shop, but operating costs will similar to other retail outlets of similar size. If it took several years before you turned a profit then you have my sympathies. I originally posted this because I've got four bike shops within ten miles of my house, and all of them are failing to maximise their returns, with a huge community of cyclists out there, half of whom probably buy on line, and the other half unlikely to want to pay LBS labour rates to fix their utility bikes. Certainly in my neighbourhood, it's a problem.

@ Forester - Sounds like your LBS is a good one.

@ thebungle - I'm the same. I don't mind paying a little extra, but I did buy some SPDs on line recently because they were half the LBS price. Generally, it's 50/50 - half with the LBS and half on line.

@Nzlucas - I do accept that "real shops cost money", but there is always an element of protectionism, which is only natural. With industry endorsed training, and a "shared workspace" initiative, the cost of entry into the cycle trade (using on line suppliers) would be much cheaper than many people realise, and could easily be sustainable for "one person" operation.

Within that scenario, acting as a collection point for on line purchasers could provide a significant additional income. We're certainly witnessing some LBS closures because owners are retiring, with no-one willing or able to continue in business, and I guess many of those owners probably only started from very small operations themselves.

I'd certainly like to see some younger people entering the business.

"Hey..... Let's be visible out there."

Neil753's picture

posted by Neil753 [451 posts]
10th December 2013 - 21:44

9 Likes

Neil753 wrote:
@ cristiansupernova - No, I don't run a bike shop, but operating costs will similar to other retail outlets of similar size.

I don't run a bike shop either, but I imagine one overhead that bike shops have that might be more unique is the cost of having a range of sizes, and the space that range takes up. If you are a clothes shop stocking a particular coat (say) it's not likely to cost >£1k for each one in each size, and you can probably keep 10-20 of them in the space you need to keep 1 bike. I dunno, maybe this is rubbish though!

Other problem is that it seems people aren't willing to pay much for work.

Neil753 wrote:
I've got four bike shops within ten miles of my house, and all of them are failing to maximise their returns, with a huge community of cyclists out there, half of whom probably buy on line, and the other half unlikely to want to pay LBS labour rates to fix their utility bikes.

What if 'LBS labour rates' are what that LBS needs to charge to make it worth doing? OK, there might well be some wiggle room but a common sentiment on here and other places seems to be that LBSs have no business sense if they don't sell everything below RRP and do all repairs in return for a smile and a packet of biscuits. It's all very well saying they can then cash in further down the line once they've built up this 'relationship' with the punter, but I'd imagine the number of regulars who won't ever have their heads turned by great offers from the internet big boys is pretty low. So where does the income come from?

posted by Chuck [381 posts]
11th December 2013 - 12:35

6 Likes

Chuck wrote:
What if 'LBS labour rates' are what that LBS needs to charge to make it worth doing? OK, there might well be some wiggle room but a common sentiment on here and other places seems to be that LBSs have no business sense if they don't sell everything below RRP and do all repairs in return for a smile and a packet of biscuits. It's all very well saying they can then cash in further down the line once they've built up this 'relationship' with the punter, but I'd imagine the number of regulars who won't ever have their heads turned by great offers from the internet big boys is pretty low. So where does the income come from?

With Wiggle I can have any item from any brand I want at a good price.

From my LBS I'm limited to the brands they stock, often at 'ridiculous' prices, £120 for Ultegra pedals when they are almost half price online?

Don't get me wrong, I've bought two bikes, a set of wheels and plenty of other kit this year alone from my LBS and I greatly value their help & advice.

I wonder if the shops selling higher end stuff such as Castelli etc are finding it any easier than those who stock the likes of Altura, I always find those shops, despite them providing very good technical assistance never actually encourage me to want to spend my money in them.

posted by thebungle [115 posts]
11th December 2013 - 13:33

1 Like

thebungle wrote:
Chuck wrote:
What if 'LBS labour rates' are what that LBS needs to charge to make it worth doing? OK, there might well be some wiggle room but a common sentiment on here and other places seems to be that LBSs have no business sense if they don't sell everything below RRP and do all repairs in return for a smile and a packet of biscuits. It's all very well saying they can then cash in further down the line once they've built up this 'relationship' with the punter, but I'd imagine the number of regulars who won't ever have their heads turned by great offers from the internet big boys is pretty low. So where does the income come from?

With Wiggle I can have any item from any brand I want at a good price.

From my LBS I'm limited to the brands they stock, often at 'ridiculous' prices, £120 for Ultegra pedals when they are almost half price online?

Don't get me wrong, I've bought two bikes, a set of wheels and plenty of other kit this year alone from my LBS and I greatly value their help & advice.

I wonder if the shops selling higher end stuff such as Castelli etc are finding it any easier than those who stock the likes of Altura, I always find those shops, despite them providing very good technical assistance never actually encourage me to want to spend my money in them.

I'm not really flying the flag for LBSs here, I rarely use bricks and mortar shops myself for more or less the same reasons you give. Apart from actually swinging a leg over a bike there's no real USP over the internet IME.
But the common refrain seems to be that in order to compete shops should charge less while giving better service, and if they miss 'opportunities' to sell stuff at a loss or do some work for nothing then they deserve to go out of business. And I can't see how it can be as simple as that.

posted by Chuck [381 posts]
11th December 2013 - 13:43

2 Likes

If you want to support your LBS - then do so, by taking your bike to them for servicing, buying parts and getting them fitted, buying whole bikes etc

I would suggest the proposal made by the OP is a bit patronizing to the LBS and demeans the real value that they have to the local consumer.

Yes many things are cheaper online, but don't expect the after sales service and expert advice from CRC or Wiggle - good though they are - they will never compete with a good LBS on after-sales service. Generally you get what you pay for.

Oh and many retailers will be prepared to price match - or come down in price - if they find themselves particularly 'overpriced' compared to the internet

posted by 700c [556 posts]
11th December 2013 - 13:52

2 Likes

“Hi is that Sainsburys? I’ve just done a big online shop with Tesco because they’re a bit cheaper than you, but I don’t want to wait around for the delivery, do you mind clearing a bit of space in your back room and I’ll come and grab it when I can. I’ll give you a quid to make it worth your while, and I might even pick up a few bits and bobs too. Hello… hello… are you still there?…”

posted by hh [4 posts]
11th December 2013 - 14:45

7 Likes

I see the merits in this, and having worked in the industry will admit to ordering parts from online retailers rather than distributors as the potential margins are greater... to clarify, online prices can, and are regularly less than trade prices available to a LBS.

I wouldn't necessarily charge a quid either... just getting someone into the shop and chatting to you (even better if they think they owe you one) is a win in itself. The way I see it, an online sale is a lost sale anyway, why not at least cash in on an opportunity to build a relationship. More than likely you'll pick up some sundry purchases, and some labour in the process.

The reality is people will shop to their needs... if they know what they want, then they'll order online as its cheaper... if they need service, or insight, then they should find their way to the LBS. Being bitter about that will not make you more money as a LBS owner... Build relationships and benefit from the long game returns, by making sure that when they need the LBS, they come to you.

posted by Jimmy Ray Will [285 posts]
11th December 2013 - 15:25

2 Likes

@ Chuck - re: the cost of having a range of sizes, and the space that range takes up.

I agree, it must be a problem. I think that's why bikes ended up in "t-shirt sizes" with "heath robinson" spacer front ends; euphemistically marketed as an aid to changing position, but bonkers for the rider (heavier, less aero, weaker main triangle) and just more profitable for the industry. I can see the need for space when selling clothing, but I suspect that many riders are "showrooming" (ie paying a visit to their LBS and then buying on line); I know that's what I do, although I do it at a LBS that doesn't even have the courtesy to say hello when I come through the door, and charges top whack for some of the gear I've bought, so there's no guilt. One thing I won't do, though, is ask questions in a shop and then buy on line. That isn't right.
I can definitely see an LBS market for shoes, though, but I know at least one recent cycling convert who never visits his LBS, purely because the LBS took advantage of his naivety with prices, to sell him last year's shoes at this year's full rrp, just to clear old stock. And, as all LBS owners ought to be aware, inexperienced cyclists are just as likely to use social networks to "share" their LBS experiences as experienced ones.

@ thebungle - some good points. Thank you.

@ Chuck - I'm not suggesting bike shops sell at a loss, I'm suggesting that if they're not going to make the sale anyway, they might as well offer a pick-up service for a nominal sum, so they can at least have the oportunity to say hello to potential customers, and perhaps tuen those potential customers into actual customers through incidental purchases.

@ 700c - I'm not picking sides here, and I'm sure there are exceptions either way, but I've found the after sales service from CRC to be exceptional (I've purchased from Wiggle too, but haven't needed to use their after service). In contrast, two out my four local bike shops are owned by miserable sh*ts who think the world owes them a living. And one of the others exhorts customers to use email but then never replies. One, however, even though their shop is a right old mess, offers exceptional service. Asking for a "price match" is a really good tip - I did that in Staples a few weeks ago, and got a fiver off a cordless phone.

@ hh - But Sainsbury's isn't struggling against an overwhelming tide of on-line competitors, is it? What they are doing is bending over backwards to accommodate customers and, crucially, recognising the increasing trend for savvy buyers to do their shopping in more than one supermarket. In fact, you may have noticed that supermarkets, and many other outlets, often set price differentials between their on line prices and their store prices, which you can then pick up in the store using their version of "click and collect" In other words, they understand that some income from savvy customers is better than no income. If dual pricing, coupled with "click and collect", is good for the likes of Halfords and PC World, and now being introduced even by supermarkets, then it's a foolish LBS owner who doesn't at least look at the concept. And certainly, if your local grocery shop can act as an agent for Ebay, there's nothing to stop cycle shops doing the same thing too; and suddenly, your shop is full of potential customers you've never met before.

At the end of the day, it's just an idea that might appeal to bike shops struggling for survival in an increasingly on line retail environment.

Just curious - are you an LBS owner? If so, I'd be interested in your views about how you think things will pan out over the next few years and, in particular, how you view the (potentially) huge increase in utility cyclists who may want to get their bikes fixed, but not at the sort labour rates being charged at their costly to run, multi staffed bike shop?

"Hey..... Let's be visible out there."

Neil753's picture

posted by Neil753 [451 posts]
11th December 2013 - 19:37

4 Likes

My LBS works in this manner (kind of).
Does mainly repairs/wheel builds, buys parts in as and when people want them and usually from where ever is cheapest (Distro or CRC etc). As well as assembly of online bought bikes.

Seems to work well for him, he doesn't have capital tied up in stock, people buying components are getting them fitted by him, and I assume he makes the 'profit' on labour & doing repair work, when I was in last his rack was rammed full so can't be doing too bad for business really.
Also helps that he does the usual of a decent LBS of helping people out when they need it, he's chucked me a few Fulcrum spokes & nipples when I snapped one before a trip away, tweaked the gears for me when I went passed on a ride and so on.

I think it's the way for the LBS to go if they want to survive, take advantage of the next day delivery many online dealers offer, and make the money on fixing and fitting.

glynr36's picture

posted by glynr36 [402 posts]
11th December 2013 - 20:56

2 Likes

Receiving on-line purchases (admin fee applied) and then fitting parts in a workshop could work well for an LBS as long as workshop pricing reflects costs+margin

Additionally there would need to be a system between on-line retailers and LBS to make sure workshop can actually undertake jobs if tool-specific/skill specific (I.e. campag or di2) parts are being shipped

posted by hampstead_bandit [140 posts]
11th December 2013 - 21:30

2 Likes

Neil753 - i am a ibd owner, have been in the trade for 23 years..and have worked (indirectly) for chainreaction..

And hell yes, we have some plans for 2014 and beyond. I also have my thoughts on how things may well pan out in future..

I do believe that simply opening the doors to display and sell your wares may well not be enough in the future, and it would take a period of time and only a few big brands to change the way they sell, kickstarting a chainreaction that would begin the decline of IBDs.. i hope im wrong.

Regardless, we do run a very passionate business, its not been easy, but amazing fun! we do everything we can (whilst still trying to pay a million bills) and do actually have a positive attitude towards online sales. I lost a sale on a £1200 road bike today, we coulndt get it fast enough, so the guy bought the bike from wiggle. Would have been nice to get the bike for him, we have a vat bill due, paye to pay,and in a few days 3months of rent for next year.

However, with a smile i said its fine, you winyou lose, shit happens, even offered to set the bike upfor him. Of course i didnt give the above sob story, we always have to remain positive after all. He is a regular, and uses us lots.

Generally, i love the challenge of business, i love the risk element, the idea that everything we buy and stock and display is all a risk. And i love it when it works. Like when someone buys a bike from us,and love riding it. Just like i do.. there are so many varibles to bikeshops, its crazy. They bring people together! We have so many stories..

posted by cristiansupernova [6 posts]
11th December 2013 - 22:46

7 Likes

Uumm, sorry i got a bit carried away.

I did fit a disc brake today that one of our regulars had sent to us from crc, i charged him a tenner. (For the record)

posted by cristiansupernova [6 posts]
11th December 2013 - 22:50

4 Likes

@glynr36 - Re: "I think it's the way for the LBS to go if they want to survive, take advantage of the next day delivery many online dealers offer, and make the money on fixing and fitting."

As we move towards sustainable, localised economies, and as more and more people give up their cars (or purchase a utility bike for shorter trips), I have a hunch that basic repair workshops may become more common. Thanks for the input.

@ hampstead_bandit - "make sure workshop can actually undertake jobs if tool-specific/skill specific".

I agree. A bike mechanic qualification is a no brainer. Even "bread and butter" bikes can require specialised tools and knowledge. But, in a way, that is to the advantage of the trained mechanic; the more complex bikes become, the less likely bike owners are to have the tools. Thanks for your input.

"Hey..... Let's be visible out there."

Neil753's picture

posted by Neil753 [451 posts]
12th December 2013 - 14:37

2 Likes

I think that with traffic to online retailers constantly growing, LBS should take what ever advantage can be taken from that. As others have said, a lost sale is a lost sale. However if that sale that might have never come Anywhere near the lbs, to actually gain 10 or 15 quid for fitting and delivery surcharge might actually be beneficial. They way to do it might be to give conditions for the service, if it's delivered here it must be fitted here ( not thinking of bike fits here).that way the lbs has guaranteed money coming in from online sales, they get the chance to make new customers and add on sales and the online retailer losers nothing either.

Not sure, but I think it could be a salvation against the decline of the lbs

Canyon Roadlite Centaur/ Veloce groupset, Shamal wheels

Miles253's picture

posted by Miles253 [202 posts]
21st January 2014 - 4:54

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