Home
From race-day-only tubulars to everyday clinchers, there’s a road bike tyre for all uses and prices in the Continental range

Continental is one of the most recognisable and trusted tyre brands in the cycling world, and if you’re in the market for a new tyre for your road bike, the German company offers a wide range of choices to meet different requirements and price points.

Continental categorises its tyres into winter/training/commute, sportive, race/triathlon and time trial/sprint tri, but there’s a lot of overlap in the range, as you can see from the graphic below. It’s a good place to start if you’re not sure which tyre is right for you. It also handily groups the tyres by price, with premium, performance and sport.

continental 2017 tyre range.png

continental 2017 tyre range.png

Read more: Trend spotting: Why you need to switch to wider tyres

Clinchers

if you're reading this it's highly likely you're more interested in clincher tyres as opposed to tubular tyres for their ease of use. Continental doesn't currently produce tubeless tyres and that's unlikely to change for a while.

Grand Prix Supersonic — £32.99

grandprixsupersonic.jpg

grandprixsupersonic.jpg

Conti's lightest clincher at 150g in the 23mm version, the Supersonic is also the fastest-rolling tyre in the stable thanks to its smooth tread and very lightweight construction. There's no built-in puncture protection and tread wear is rapid because there's just not much tread there in the first place. This is a tyre to pair with the lightest inner tubes you can find for time trials and other short events. As Conti themselves say "Riders should weigh up the compromises that they are willing to take before selecting this tyre". Available in 20mm and 23mm widths.

Continental Attack and Force — £59.99

 Continental Attack and Force III.png

Continental Attack and Force III.png

This is Continental’s top-end clincher tyre and has been designed for racing duties. It combines two different width tyres, a 23mm Attack on the front, and a wider 25mm Force on the back, which also utilises Vectran puncture protection for added toughness. You can buy them as a pair for £99.95 or individually for £54.95.

The Attack and Force are also available in a tubular version costing £129.95 for the pair and combines a 22mm front tyre with a 24mm rear tyre.

Continental Grand Prix 4000 S II — from £28.99

Continental Grand Prix 4000 S II .png

Continental Grand Prix 4000 S II .png

This is one of the company’s most popular high-end road tyres and has a lot of fans, you’ll always hear people recommend it in any conversation about buying new tyres.

It’s intended as a race tyre but a Vectran puncture breaker and Black Chilli rubber compound provide good all-round performance away from the race circuit. It comes in a wide range of widths from 20mm all the way up to 28mm, the latter weighing a claimed 260g.

"Out on the road they feel extremely smooth and fast," said Dave Atkinson in his review of the 28mm version. "Continental's Black Chilli rubber is predictable in both the wet and dry. I've used these tyres for everything up to a 300km cross-country day trip and I've never found them to be wanting for grip,' he adds. Read the review here.

Continental Grand Prix 4 Season — £31.99

Continental Grand Prix 4 season.png

Continental Grand Prix 4 season.png

If you want a slightly tougher and more durable tyre than the GP4000, the 4 Season is the tyre for you. Conti has manufactured the tyre with two Vectran anti-puncture strips and added a DuraSkin anti-tear fabric to boost its toughness and longevity, it’s a tyre for conquering the cobbles and thanks to a Max Grip Silica compound, wet winter roads as well. It’s available in four widths from 23 up to 32mm making it a good all-rounder.

Continental Grand Prix GT — £44.99/pr

Continental Grand Prix GT .png

Continental Grand Prix GT .png

The GT stands for Grand Tour, this is a tyre designed to do survive UK sportives, but any long ride where you want reliability without sacrificing performance is where this tyre shines. Continental has combined the toughness of its Gator Hardshell tyre and the performance of the GP4000S and its Black Chilli compound. There’s a wider PolyX Breaker to protect against punctures and extra sidewall thickness provides added reinforcement. It comes in just two 700c widths, 25 and 28mm, and a 26x1in option.

Continental Grand Prix — from £21.79

Continental Grand Prix.png

Continental Grand Prix.png

The Grand Prix is the original tyre, the one that spawned the GP4000 S II, but Continental has kept it in the range and at £30 it’s one of the cheapest tyres to utilise the company’s Black Chilli rubber compound. It comes in 23, 25 and 28mm widths and is a good road race tyre. You'll sometimes see a Grand Prix SL listed as spec on bikes. Don't get too excited, this is just a Grand Prix with a silver label instead of yellow for bikes with more subdued colour schemes.

Continental Grand Prix Classic — £21.78

Continental Grand Prix Classic.png

Continental Grand Prix Classic.png

Based on the Grand Prix but given a brown sidewall and retro label, this is the tyre to choose for a retro build. The tread pattern has actually been taken from a tyre Continental produced back in 1982 but still features the latest Black Chill compound and PolyX Breaker for avoiding flats.

Read more: How to choose your tyre pressure

Continental Gator Hardshell — £27.99-£38.99

Continental Gator Hardshell .png

Continental Gator Hardshell .png

If you want a supremely tough tyre for commuting and city riding, Continental’s Gator Hardshell is a tyre with plenty of protection. It uses a 3-ply casing with an extra layer of Polyamide protection, a wider PolyX anti-puncture belt under the tread and down the sidewall, and a Duraskin anti-tear mesh on the outside of the casing, all to produce a tyre that can withstand the rigours of daily commuting. Available in widths from 23mm to 32mm and choice of rigid or folding bead, the latter being the lighter, but more costly, option.

Continental Gatorskin — £21.95-£32.99

Continental Gatorskin .png

Continental Gatorskin .png

A popular training tyre, the Gatorskin is designed to be a reliable and hard-wearing tyre for going the distance and preventing punctures. It’s made with a Duraskin cut-resistant layer that stretches from bead to bead, features a PolyX Breaker for stopping thorns and glasses cutting through the carcass, and uses a natural rubber tread. A full range of width options from 23mm up to 32mm is available, with rigid and folding bead versions.

Continental Grand Sport Race — £21.49–£23.99 

Continental Grand Sport Race.png

Continental Grand Sport Race.png

The first of Continental’s performance line tyres, the Grand Sport Race swaps the expensive Black Chilli compound for a newer PureGrip compound that the company developed to keep the price more reasonable, and at £30 it’s an attractive price. It uses a folding bead to keep the weight down, and new NyTech puncture belt and comes in 23 to 32mm width options. It’s also available in three versions using different casing builds, Light, Race and Extra, aimed at competition, sportives and heavy duty use respectively.

"They roll well too, to the extent that it's possible to judge such things without a lab available. I don't know that they'd be my first choice for racing, but they wouldn't really hold you back much if you did decide to press them into such service, and for general road riding or commuting they are just fine. I used them on the club chaingang as racing didn't really happen for me this year, and I had no complaints in terms of speed," said Jez Ash in his review. You can read the review here.

Continental Ultra Sport II — £9.99

Continental Ultra Sport II.png

Continental Ultra Sport II.png

This is a tyre you’ll see on a quite a lot of new road bikes as it’s popular with bike brands wanting to offer a quality tyre without a big price tag. It’s billed as a trainer and entry level tyre using Continental’s PureGrip compound and a supple 180 TPI (threads per inch) casing. It’s available in 23, 25, 28 and 32mm widths and rigid and folding beads.

Supersport Plus — £13.56-£20.93

Supersport Plus.png

Supersport Plus.png

This is a tyre designed to be tough enough for the most demanding commuters, bicycle messengers and fixie riders. It uses the same tread pattern as the more expensive Grand Prix tyre with a thick elastomer belt under the tread to provide a high level of puncture protection, and a robust casing with added sidewall durability. Built to survive anything, it comes in 23, 25, 28mm, 27 x 1 1/8in and 27 x 1 1/4in widths with rigid or folding beads.

Read more: What width tyres are best for you? You've never had a wider choice of high-performance road bike tyres, but how do you decide how wide to go?

Tubulars

So far we’ve focused on clincher tyres as that’s the most popular choice with road.cc readers, but Continental produces a raft of tubular tyres, tyres that glue directly onto the rim.

Attack Comp (£57.99) and Force Comp (£69.99)

Continental Attack Comp and Force Comp.png

Continental Attack Comp and Force Comp.png

The Attack and Force employ the same basic idea of a narrower front tyre and wider more reinforced rear tyre as the clincher version of the same name but step down to 22mm at the front and 24mm at the rear.

Competition — £61.99-£70.99

Continental Competition.png

Continental Competition.png

Continental is one of the most popular tyres in the professional peloton, and while the pros get the special Pro Ltd version, this is essentially the tyre that has been riding to multiple race victories, including the 2016 Tour de France at the hands of Chris Froome. Handmade in Germany with a Black Chilli compound and four layers of puncture protection, and available in 19, 22 and 25mm widths, these are race-ready tyres.

Grand Prix 4000S II Tubular — £59.95

Grand Prix 4000 Tubular .png

Grand Prix 4000 Tubular .png

The tubular version of the popular GP4000 clincher, on which this tyre is actually modelled with the same Black Chill tread compound and Vectran puncture protection. Is only sold in 22mm width, though.

Continental Sprinter — £36.99

Continental Sprinter.png

Continental Sprinter.png

A tyre designed solely for short road races and criteriums, the Sprinter uses a nylon puncture protection breaker and is handmade in Germany using the German company’s Black Chilli compound with an additional nylon ‘safety system’ puncture belt.

Olympic II — £193.69

continental-olympic-ii-28-x-19mm-black-chili-tubular-tyre-p4440-8535_image.jpg

continental-olympic-ii-28-x-19mm-black-chili-tubular-tyre-p4440-8535_image.jpg

The most expensive tyre in the Continental range, this is a tyre produced for the velodrome and represents the company’s pinnacle of hand sewn tubular tyres. Features the same Black Chilli compound as the road focused tyres but a 220 TPI carcass with two aramid plies provides a recommended inflation of 170psi.

Podium TT — £59.99

Continental Podium TT.png

Continental Podium TT.png

A tubular tyre designed for time trial events, hence the name, this one is favoured by some of the top professional cycling teams from BMC to Movistar. It’s a 19mm width to maximise aerodynamic efficiency and the 0.7mm tread rubber minimises weight, yet Continental is confident the tyre will last a full British club time trial programme. Available in 19, 22 and 25mm widths.

Giro — £17.99

Continental Giro.png

Continental Giro.png

This is Continental’s most affordable tubular tyre. It’s intended for training rides rather than competition events, and the cost is kept down because it’s made in Asia rather than Germany.

From Mat Brett's 2010 review: "There aren’t too many tubulars out there that are cheaper than the Continental Giro. Sure, you can find some, but this is certainly at the budget end of the market and it’s billed as an ‘inexpensive training tubular’. Bear that in mind and don’t go expecting a top level racing performance. But as an off-season run-around, it’s fine."

Read more: 18 of the best road cycling tyres

About road.cc Buyer's Guides

The aim of road.cc buyer's guides is to give you the most, authoritative, objective and up-to-date buying advice. We continuously update and republish our guides, checking prices, availability and looking for the best deals.

Our guides include links to websites where you can buy the featured products. Like most sites we make a small amount of money if you buy something after clicking on one of those links. We want you to be happy with what you buy, so we only include a product in a if we think it's one of the best of its kind.

As far as possible that means recommending equipment that we have actually reviewed, but we also include products that are popular, highly-regarded benchmarks in their categories.

Here's some more information on how road.cc makes money.

You can also find further guides on our sister sites off.road.cc and ebiketips.

Road.cc buyer's guides are maintained and updated by John Stevenson. Email John with comments, corrections or queries.

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

31 comments

Avatar
sergius [548 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

It's worth noting that as per a notification I received from Hunt recently - continental have now issued guidance that their tyres should not be used with tubeless wheels where there is no lip on the rim.

 

This is a bit of a bummer as I've been using continental tyres for years - but can (or rather should) not use them with my new wheels.

 

I've not seen anyone else publicise this, and can't imagine it's only Hunt rims that are affected; they listed a couple of others:

 

<quote>

These wheels feature our Hunt H-Lock Wedge (HLW) sidewalls which are similar in design to those found on Enve SES AR4.5 Disc road wheels and Stans Avion Disc road wheels. The Hunt H-Lock Wedge sidewalls have stronger impact resistance and lock the bead in place whilst allowing the tyre to reach a wider overall size reducing rolling resistance and providing more grip.

</quote>

Avatar
StraelGuy [1439 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

The Grand Prix GT is my go to summer tyre. Lightish, buttery smooth and tons of grip, wet or dry.

Avatar
Simon E [3330 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

Continental's tyre chooser is probably a good place to start. Once in a category you get a handy graphical indication of each tyre's intended use:

http://conti-tyres.co.uk/tyre-chooser

@sergius - there's no mention of any issues with Conti tyres on the Hunt website, in fact they list several Contis to buy with your wheelset.

Avatar
sergius [548 posts] 1 year ago
1 like
Simon E wrote:

Continental's tyre chooser is probably a good place to start. Once in a category you get a handy graphical indication of each tyre's intended use:

http://conti-tyres.co.uk/tyre-chooser

@sergius - there's no mention of any issues with Conti tyres on the Hunt website, in fact they list several Contis to buy with your wheelset.

 

Yeah it's recent, on Monday they sent me a big email about it and have now shipped me some Schwalbe Pro Ones to replace the Continentals.  I suspect the website just hasn't caught up yet.

Avatar
drosco [428 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

The price for the 4 seasons are eye wateringly high. £110 for a pair!?

Avatar
StraelGuy [1439 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

4 Seasons are always very expensive for some reason. I replaced mine recently with the new Michelin Power Endurance. The Michelins roll way faster and seem to be just as puncture resistant, if not more so. They're a very good winter tyre and easier to fit than the Conti's, despite what the review on here and other websites have reported.

Avatar
check12 [219 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

It's great having a big range but when most of the tyres end up at about £23-£27 including the 4000S then it's hard to look past the 4000S even if it is a touch more  

The Grand Prix GT is a nice idea, good rolling black chilli and bead to bead puncture protection, but the folding tyre is tricky to find in 28mm because why would you want a wire bead. 

But then the Michelin pro4 endurance v2 28mm is available at chain reaction with tube for £28 which negates the gp gt in my eyes. 

4 season is supposed to be tough but slow rolling and again pro 4 end v2 is a lot cheaper. 

Just my thoughts, your rubber may vary. 

Avatar
Simon E [3330 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

@ chec12 - agreed, the Michelin Endurance is hard to beat for performance and value. 4 Season is overpriced IMVHO.

Avatar
Simon E [3330 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
check12 wrote:

4 season is supposed to be tough but slow rolling and again pro 4 end v2 is a lot cheaper.

I agree. I've found that the Michelin Endurance is hard to beat for performance, wear and value. 4 Season is overpriced/overrated now IMVHO, things have moved on a bit.

Avatar
Bungle73 [10 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
drosco wrote:

The price for the 4 seasons are eye wateringly high. £110 for a pair!?

You're looking in the wrong place. I paid £61.96 for a pair of 28s from Wiggle at the beginnng of the year.

Avatar
ChrisB200SX [769 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

I believe most/all of the Continental tyre designers are now employed by Specialized to develop their new/recent tyres?

Cheapest price I saw recently (I have previously ordered them a bit cheaper) ... Continental Grand Prix 4000S II Folding Tyre ... £26.99

https://www.acycles.co.uk/continental-grand-prix-4000s-ii-folding-tyre-1...

Avatar
matthewn5 [1201 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

Conti list the Sprinter as a Sportive - Race tyre, not a crit tyre:

http://conti-tyres.co.uk/road-and-track/tubulars

Avatar
Redvee [400 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
Bungle73 wrote:
drosco wrote:

The price for the 4 seasons are eye wateringly high. £110 for a pair!?

You're looking in the wrong place. I paid £61.96 for a pair of 28s from Wiggle at the beginnng of the year.

 

I've never paid more than £35 for a GP4Season, usually £31/£32. Best deal I got was a pricematch and BC discount which brought a pair of tyres down to £27 each. Based on the price I pay per tyre I like to get close to 3000 miles from a tyre so the actual cost is as close to 1p/mile as possible.

Avatar
PaulBox [681 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
drosco wrote:

The price for the 4 seasons are eye wateringly high. £110 for a pair!?

There are always deals to be had, I bought two with three conti tubes for about £66 from Sigma Sport recently.

A quick google shows the 28mm's at £32.49 a pop on Wiggle.

Avatar
StraelGuy [1439 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

Agree with Paul. My GP GTs are fairly scragged so I'm going to replace them with GP4000S IIs so I'm doing a lot of searching. Ribble are doing best so far at £58 a pair. A lot of shops are doing twin pack deals on them but only in 23 and 28 size which is weird.

Avatar
StraelGuy [1439 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

Changed my mind. Just replaced the 25 mm Grand Prix GTs with the same but in 28mm. Used to run 75/85 so I'm going to try 65/75 when I take it out tomorrow. For anyone with the same bike, 2015 Giant Defy Advanced 2, there's still a ton of room left around the tyres, a good 4-7 mm depending on where you look.

Avatar
gunswick [131 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

The lack of tubeless for Conti is bizarre. It's a deliberate denial and makes no sense to me.

Schwalbe Pro and S-one etc are seriously impressive and must be taking a good chunk of business from them.

I agree GP4S are pricey for pretty average protection, they aren't that fast, grippy or that puncture proof. They are OK but the rest of the manufacturers have caught up and moved on, where as Conti havent changed their tyres in years. For me race tyres run tubeless beats them and gives best of both worlds.

Avatar
Anthony.C [263 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
ChrisB200SX wrote:

I believe most/all of the Continental tyre designers are now employed by Specialized to develop their new/recent tyres?

Cheapest price I saw recently (I have previously ordered them a bit cheaper) ... Continental Grand Prix 4000S II Folding Tyre ... £26.99

https://www.acycles.co.uk/continental-grand-prix-4000s-ii-folding-tyre-1...

I think that is a French website and you have to factor in postage which is £3.99 minimum.

Avatar
kevvjj [384 posts] 10 months ago
0 likes
gunswick wrote:

"They are OK but the rest of the manufacturers have caught up and moved on, where as Conti havent changed their tyres in years. For me race tyres run tubeless beats them and gives best of both worlds."

Michelin?

Avatar
OR_biker [41 posts] 10 months ago
0 likes

I really need to try some more Michelin tires.  I've had good luck commuting with their Krylion Carbon on my rear wheel.  Last tire went over 1,600 miles for me without a flat, though it had plenty of serious-looking cuts.  Changed it out becuase it was wearing down pretty bad and the profile was starting to square.  BTW, 1,600 miles is quite a bit for me with tires.  Typically I'm lucky if a tire gets much over 1,000.  Not sure if it's my weight (down to around 88kg's currently) or what, but tires just don't last long for me.

Have tried a few Conti's, and surprisingly the one that has been the most durable for me was the Ultra Sport.  Went over 1,800 miles (record for me) before tread started fraying and I replaced it.  No flats on it either, though.  Could have maybe squeezed another few hundred miles out of it but when I only paid $17 for it it didn't seem worth the risk.  Only used it on my front wheel - I've found my best combo for commuting while not feeling like I need to put on different tires for group rides is a thicker, puncture-resistant back tire with a lighter training/racing tire on the front.  Tried a GP4-Season on my back wheel one time and barely got 600 miles out of it before tread looked real thin and I started getting flats.  Trying a Gatorskin on the rear of my new wheels to see how it goes.  Used one several years ago on a hybrid I converted into a drop-bar and wasn't a fan, but want to give it another chance with my lighter body weight/nicer bike/more experience.

Avatar
kil0ran [917 posts] 10 months ago
0 likes

I'm guessing the 4 Season is that little bit more expensive because its hand made - most of the other tyres aren't.

Interested to read the spec of the Grand Prix GT, tempted to give those a go.

Currently have some 25mm 4 Seasons and 32mm Gators. Not a fan of the Gators in that size, surprisingly skiddy on manhole covers and cattle grids compared to the GravelKings I have on at the moment.

Too many tyres! That'll teach me for going from a 25mm max rim-brake bike to a disc-equipped that can run 32mm+ under guards.

Avatar
Christopher TR1 [195 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

The last pair of Supersonic 20mm tyres which I bought came up at 23mm and had a very fine tread instead of the totally slick finish. Has anyone else had a similar experience, or can anyone explain why this might be? I wrote to Continental using the contact formula ontheir website but they never bothered to reply (which doesn't make me keen to give them my hard-earned).

The tyres in question were marked "Supersonic" and "20mm", so all I want to know really is if this was a munufactirung mistake or if they have changed the design of the tyres.

I have also tried the very popular GP 4000 SII and, although fast and grippy, I found the puncture protection to be very poor - I would not buy them again because if I want to choose performance at the expense of puncture protection, then I will choose the Supersonics.

 

Avatar
gary p [8 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

I appreciate choice, but, man, there's a lot of overlapping product here.  Is there really a need for the 4000S II, Supersonic, TT, and Force/Attack combo?  Seems to me you could consolidate that to three models, easily, and maybe just two.    And is there really a need for the Grand Prix, Grand Prix GT, Grand Sport Race, and Ultra Sport II?   That seems about two models more than neccesary to cover the semi-performance segment.   

Avatar
Richard1982 [102 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

Ah you missed out my favourite tyre, Tempo II tubular, it's great for outdoor velodromes and TT's - fantastic tyre. There's also the Sonderklasse II tyre for indoor velodrome use  1

Avatar
andyspaceman [255 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

I think the Grant Prix GT is a fabulous tyre, quick and tough enough for winter on all but the worst back lanes.

For summer I go back to GP4000S2's (or tubeless Maxxis Padrones)

Avatar
ShinyBits [8 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
sergius wrote:

It's worth noting that as per a notification I received from Hunt recently - continental have now issued guidance that their tyres should not be used with tubeless wheels where there is no lip on the rim.

 

This is a bit of a bummer as I've been using continental tyres for years - but can (or rather should) not use them with my new wheels.

 

This concerns me too, and I can't find anything about it online at all. I'm just about to put Contis on some Prime carbon wheels (I'm sure this is a fairly common set up) and it would be good to know it's all above board. Hopefully Conti is just being super-cautious.

Avatar
bikerchickie [4 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
sergius wrote:

It's worth noting that as per a notification I received from Hunt recently - continental have now issued guidance that their tyres should not be used with tubeless wheels where there is no lip on the rim.

 

This is a bit of a bummer as I've been using continental tyres for years - but can (or rather should) not use them with my new wheels.

 

I've not seen anyone else publicise this, and can't imagine it's only Hunt rims that are affected; they listed a couple of others:

 

<quote>

These wheels feature our Hunt H-Lock Wedge (HLW) sidewalls which are similar in design to those found on Enve SES AR4.5 Disc road wheels and Stans Avion Disc road wheels. The Hunt H-Lock Wedge sidewalls have stronger impact resistance and lock the bead in place whilst allowing the tyre to reach a wider overall size reducing rolling resistance and providing more grip.

</quote>

It is worth noting that this only applies to the carbon rims manufactured by Hunt prior to December 2017. This is stated on their website (bottom of this page) and has been confirmed by Hunt themselves when I emailed them. 

Avatar
kiwiglider [27 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Ridden on GP4000s for years. Had two side walls fail which has made me question their quality. Hear I'm not the only one to experience problems. 

Avatar
kiwiglider [27 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Ridden on GP4000s for years. Had two side walls fail which has made me question their quality. Hear I'm not the only one to experience problems. 

Avatar
kiwiglider [27 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Ridden on GP4000s for years. Had two side walls fail which has made me question their quality. Hear I'm not the only one to experience problems. 

Pages