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Not rolling in cash? These bikes will get you on the road without busting the bank

Road bikes are the fastest and most fun way of getting around under your own power, zooming you to the office during the week and taking you out to explore the lanes at the weekends.

What if you're dying to join the cycling revolution, but can't afford the four-figure price tags of those featherweight carbon creations in your local bike shop? We've combed the catalogues for a selection of decent bikes that'll get you started without breaking the bank.

Fortunately almost every bike out there meets what we'd consider the rock-bottom minimum spec for a bike to be safe and pleasant to ride. Horrors such as hard-to-repair cottered cranks and steel rims with useless wet-weather braking are things of the past. Most of these bikes have efficient, easy-to-use gears from Japanese firm Shimano, the world's biggest maker of bike components.

We've looked for bikes with drop handlebars — the defining feature of a road bike — indexed gears that click into place to make changing easier and at least 14 speeds so you get a decent range of gears for riding up and down hills.

If you want to know more, we've an in-depth article about choosing and buying your first road bike. Go have a thorough read, we'll wait here.

£200 and under

If your budget is this tight looking for a second hand bargain is something you should seriously consider (see below for more), but if it has to be new if you shop around for discount bargains during the winter you might find something.

Vittesse Sprint —  £165

Vitesse.jpg

Vitesse.jpg

 

The Vitesse Sprint is typical of what you'll find for well under £200, with an aluminium frame and 18-speed gears. You're not going to win any races on this (unless you're little short of superhuman) but it'll get you started, and the triple chainset gives you low gears for hills.

Avenir Aspire — £184.99

avenir.jpg

avenir.jpg

Head to Amazon and you can get this Avenir Aspire for just £185. Unlike some inexpensive road bikes, it's available in several sizes, which is immediately far more appealing, as getting the right size bike is so important to cycling happiness.

You'll have to do some assembly to get the Aspire on the road. If this is your first road bike and you're unfamiliar with setting up bikes, we suggest getting a mechanically inclined friend to help.

£200-£300

B'Twin Triban 100 — £220

B'Twin Triban 100.jpg

B'Twin Triban 100.jpg

A new model for 2017 from French-based sports superstore chain Decathlon, the B'Twin Triban 100 has an aluminium frame and seven-speed gears with 32mm tyres so it can tackle the odd dirt track or towpath without any fuss. It'll take mudguards and a rack so will make a serviceable commuter that can take you pootling round the lanes at the weekend. 

Wiggle Road Bike — £250

Wiggle-Road-Bike-Road-Bikes-Black-1WGMY16R7048UK0001-0.jpg

Wiggle-Road-Bike-Road-Bikes-Black-1WGMY16R7048UK0001-0.jpg

Wiggle's own-brand range of basic cycling gear includes this entry-level road bike, which looks pretty decent, on paper at least. It has an aluminium alloy frame with 14-speed Shimano gearing and combined brake/gear levers for easy shifting.

Unusually at this price its available in five sizes, so you should be able to get one that fits well unless you're very tall or short.

Raleigh Airlite 100 — £299.00

Raleigh Airlite 100

Raleigh Airlite 100

The Airlite 100 boasts an unusually good frame for the price, which means you could upgrade components such as the wheels later and you wouldn't be putting lipstick on a pig. You even get an alloy fork where most bikes in this range use steel.

B'Twin Triban 500 SE — £299

BTwin Triban 500SE.jpg

BTwin Triban 500SE.jpg

French-based international sport store chain Decathlon has a wide range of keenly-priced road bikes of which the Triban 500 SE stands out if you're strictly limited to £300.

You get a good quality aluminium alloy frame and lightweight components. Most significantly you get a really wide range of gears thanks to the triple chainset and eight rear sprockets, and the frame is available in five sizes.

On paper the gearing means you get 24 ratios, but in practice there is lots of overlap between ranges from the three chainrings. What matters isn't the number, but that the small ring gives you lower gears for easier hill-climbing.

Dawes Giro 200 — £296.99

Dawes Giro 200

Dawes Giro 200

Dawes is one of the most famous names in British cycle manufacturing. For decades its Galaxy and Super Galaxy have been the choice of luggage-toting touring cyclists.

That heritage shows in the Giro 200, which uses the same lightweight aluminium frame as higher-spec models in the Giro range, which goes to the £800 Giro 700.

The downside of getting a top-quality frame at this price is that the components are somewhat down-specced; the Giro 200 has the same rocker shifters usually found on cheaper bikes. But with Evans's ten percent off it's a decent deal on a bike that will stand upgrading when your budget allows.

Carrera Zelos — £249

carrera zelos

carrera zelos

There are plenty of bikes costing under £300 at Halfords, and pick of the bunch is this Carrera Zelos. It's currently discounted to £250 from the £300 it usually sells for, so it's a good deal if you act quickly. It features an aluminium frame built up with a 14-speed Shimano groupset and Tektro dual pivot brakes.

The secondhand alternative

If you've got champagne — or maybe prosecco — tastes but only a beer budget, there are bargains to be had in the secondhand market.

The places to look are eBay, Gumtree and our own classified ads.

Gumtree has a good guide to staying safe and not getting scammed or lumbered with a stolen bike, and eBay has a thorough guide to the intricacies of buying safely through its auction system.

Plucked from the obscurity of his London commute back in the mid-Nineties to live in Bath and edit bike mags our man made the jump to the interweb back in 2006 as launch editor of a large cycling website somewhat confusingly named after a piece of navigational equipment. He came up with the idea for road.cc mainly to avoid being told what to do… Oh dear, issues there then. Tony tries to ride his bike every day and if he doesn't he gets grumpy, he likes carbon, but owns steel, and wants titanium. When not on his bike or eating cake Tony spends his time looking for new ways to annoy the road.cc team. He's remarkably good at it.

7 comments

Avatar
Hipshot [61 posts] 10 months ago
2 likes

Good article, it's remarkable what a couple of hundred quid can buy, the BTwin in particular looks amazing.

My advice is save up just a little bit more and get a slighly better model with carbon forks and Shimano Sora or similar. £400 or so is a sweetspot. Much cheaper than upgrading later on.

It is right to mention buying second hand too , get someone to who knows a bit about bikes to help and you can get some real bargains. I recently bought an immaculate 2012 Wiler Triestina  with Campagnolo for £200 on ebay. Stupidly cheap, and I actually prefer it to my Cervelo.

 

 

Avatar
davkt [43 posts] 10 months ago
4 likes

"you even get an alloy fork where most bikes in this range use steel" Hmm I'd far rather have a good steel fork than cheap aluminium one, much nicer to ride!

Avatar
80sMatchbox [35 posts] 9 months ago
1 like

I was out on my winter bike, my Allez on Saturday and this young lad asked me how much it costs... He was surprised when I told him that it was £350. He thought that it was an expensive bike until I told him. Admittedly he didn't know much about bikes..

It was second hand a number of years ago but if I could have bought some of the bikes in this list at the time, I would have been tempted to buy new.

Avatar
unconstituted [2275 posts] 9 months ago
0 likes
80sMatchbox wrote:

I was out on my winter bike, my Allez on Saturday and this young lad asked me how much it costs... He was surprised when I told him that it was £350. He thought that it was an expensive bike until I told him. Admittedly he didn't know much about bikes.. It was second hand a number of years ago but if I could have bought some of the bikes in this list at the time, I would have been tempted to buy new.

 

Bit off-topic but I saw the 2017 Allez Sprints on Instagram last night. WOW

 

Look like pure baller machines. I'd love one. Though they are actually still a tad pricey I bet. Can't find any word on UK prices but definitely gonna be over a grand..

 

https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/allezsprint/

Avatar
Griff500 [207 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
Hipshot wrote:

My advice is save up just a little bit more and get a slighly better model with carbon forks and Shimano Sora or similar. £400 or so is a sweetspot. Much cheaper than upgrading later on.

It is right to mention buying second hand too , get someone to who knows a bit about bikes to help and you can get some real bargains. I recently bought an immaculate 2012 Wiler Triestina  with Campagnolo for £200 on ebay. Stupidly cheap, and I actually prefer it to my Cervelo

But therein lies the problem! If you get the bug, you will always want to upgrade later on. There are a bunch advantages of buying second hand. First, you get more bang for your buck now. Second, if you decide to sell later to fund an upgrade later, you will suffer less depreciation on a second hand bike. A budget spec alloy Trek or Giant will always be easier to offload than a Carrera. Third, the hydroforming on an alloy Trek or Giant looks, and performs proper, to the point where you pass one in the street and find yourself looking for the welds to see if it is carbon! 

Avatar
SingleSpeed [233 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
unconstituted wrote:
80sMatchbox wrote:

I was out on my winter bike, my Allez on Saturday and this young lad asked me how much it costs... He was surprised when I told him that it was £350. He thought that it was an expensive bike until I told him. Admittedly he didn't know much about bikes.. It was second hand a number of years ago but if I could have bought some of the bikes in this list at the time, I would have been tempted to buy new.

 

Bit off-topic but I saw the 2017 Allez Sprints on Instagram last night. WOW

 

Look like pure baller machines. I'd love one. Though they are actually still a tad pricey I bet. Can't find any word on UK prices but definitely gonna be over a grand..

 

https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/allezsprint/

Yeah they were for a while a Specialized US product but I know any Specialized UK dealer can order them, from top of my head £1600 springs to my mind.

The perfect Crit Racing bike, fast but relatively disposable when some Cat 3 nodder decides to take everyone down running out of talent.  1

Avatar
shewy [1 post] 5 days ago
0 likes

you won't go wrong with the btwin, it has carbon forks and the micro shifters are just as good as my Shimano tiagra shifters on my boardman. Also has a wide spread of gears with the 3 ring front and 8 ring rear, great for hills.