Where's daddy going?

The 2014 season is going to have to wait. There's more important things than racing.

by SamShaw   March 6, 2014  

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Every morning I disappear sometime between 7-7.30, I live 4 miles from work, I could feasibly leave at 8.45 and arrive on time but I want to get an hour or more on the bike before I get to the office.  On Saturdays I disappear for half the day... it's accepted.  My kids are used to seeing me dressed in my lycra, sloping off down the shed to get my bike.  Despite all this, they still ask: “Where's daddy going?”...  I don't want it to be the only thing they remember about early childhood. 

I like racing.  But this year I'm not (at the moment) planning on pinning on a number.  Last year I was going well early season, scored a point (whoop!), got ill, tried to power through, coughed up blood at a crit, had a long time off the bike during the best of the summer, got depressed about being off the bike, got depressed about losing form, never regained it, moped around a lot.  2013 didn't go well.

What's changed?

I like riding my bike.  Just riding... not unlike VecchioJo's recent blog.  Targeted sessions, structured training, specific work to improve weaknesses?  I've learned over the last few years that they're not my thing.  I'm not a big fan of the dreaded turbo either... I've always been doomed to fail.

Partly my avoidance of structure is down to not knowing how to improve the areas in which I am weak.  I've got mates that do the structured sessions; they're focussed; they investigate and plan well, it shows in their results.  They've got jobs, they've got kids, they've got commitments like I have; whatever they do to fit it all in is admirable (see my mate Owen's handy blog about such matters).

Then there's the time spent scouring the British Cycling website for races, entering, hoping you get a start, not planning anything for those weekends, declining social invitations just in case.  Then when you get a start, it's generally a whole day taken out of the weekend.  Daddy's disappeared again.

Excuses

I've been putting off writing this blog for a few months, mainly because it feels like a failure to admit that I'm not going to be racing.  There's been more than one thing that's contributed to this decision, but this is how I felt last year:

If I was getting enough time on the bike, I was feeling guilty about not spending enough time with the kids... If I felt I was spending some quality time with the kids, I was worrying about all the work that my friends/rival racers were putting in while I was building towers out of Lego.

It's not concrete that I won't race this year, if there's a feeling like I could do something useful in a race, then I'll consider it.  As it is, the Category 4 (and 3 / 4) events in Scotland are generally oversubscribed so someone who's really dedicated to it should get a start, not me.

Looking forward

Despite how this blog reads, I'm feeling pretty confident and happy about cycling this year.  It feels like a pressure has been lifted and I can do what I want without worrying about whether I'm riding enough or if I'm spending too much time with the kids.  Racing is something I will come back to when the children are older (who knows, it might be next year) and they're more interested in knocking about with their mates than their dad, but at the moment, they're the priority. 

Bloody hell... this must be how David Millar felt when announcing his retirement! (Now how do I make that read as a joke, without using a Wink smiley?)

For 2014, I will mostly be just enjoying riding my bike...

...and playing with Lego.

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Great post! Despite my wife give me a pass to go riding whenever I want, I leave some Saturdays or Sundays off the bike, however, just to spend some time with her and kids.
Therefore, I have some luxury, that I work part time only and I use to go for a ride, when kids are in school. Good 2 o 3 hours in the saddle.

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posted by ciulabula [2 posts]
8th March 2014 - 8:17

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Whatever next ?

I suppose you'll be joining a cycling club and going on clubruns and stopping in cafes and chatting and just enjoying your cycling instead of head banging the whole way round your Strava segment.

Cycling doesn't have to be all about "Macho" stuff.

Binky

posted by davebinks [125 posts]
8th March 2014 - 17:09

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davebinks wrote:
Whatever next ?

I suppose you'll be joining a cycling club and going on clubruns and stopping in cafes and chatting and just enjoying your cycling instead of head banging the whole way round your Strava segment.

Cycling doesn't have to be all about "Macho" stuff.

So....

I'm in a club.
I go on club runs.
I stop at café's.
I chat.
I enjoy cycling.
I don't do Strava.
I'm not very macho.

Any more myths you need busting so that I can conform to your ideals? Rolling Eyes

Twitter: @velosam

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posted by SamShaw [252 posts]
10th March 2014 - 10:12

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I don't know how old your kids are, but mine are 6 & 7, and it does get a bit better. If nothing else you can go our riding with them!

My eldest reckons he can trackstand better than me, and my youngest was racing 'cross in the Yorkshire Points and BSCA events when he was 5!

Actually, I know we are now on the wrong time of year but cyclocross is really family friendly, often only taking up a morning and you don't need lots of endurance from long trainng rides. Likewise club 10s in the summer.

posted by Chris James [177 posts]
10th March 2014 - 14:19

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Chris James wrote:
I don't know how old your kids are, but mine are 6 & 7, and it does get a bit better. If nothing else you can go our riding with them!

My eldest reckons he can trackstand better than me, and my youngest was racing 'cross in the Yorkshire Points and BSCA events when he was 5!

Actually, I know we are now on the wrong time of year but cyclocross is really family friendly, often only taking up a morning and you don't need lots of endurance from long trainng rides. Likewise club 10s in the summer.

That's good to hear, mine are 5 & 2, the bike trailer is my friend at the moment!

5yo is more into ballet at the moment, 2yo definitely needs a high-energy outlet - he's an animal! Smile

CX is definitely a thought for the future, I know a few people in the club who race on the same day as their kids, and also get involved with the coaching side of things too. We've got a really popular junior club so I need to get the kids on the waiting list shortly!

Twitter: @velosam

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posted by SamShaw [252 posts]
10th March 2014 - 14:46

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I have wondered whether my missus wants me to sacrifice more than other guys have to, so it's nice to hear of others juggling to manage their priorities. My 4 month old twins are hard work, so I'm currently lucky to squeeze 2 30mile rides into a week.

I enjoy club rides, but think even when they're a little older, I'm not that optimistic about being able to devote an entire Sunday morning to riding. Maybe the commute, the mid-week evening club ride and a few evening club 10s are where my future is. I'd be happy with that.

Last night I would have considered trading a very loud baby for a really nice bike.

posted by notfastenough [3066 posts]
10th March 2014 - 14:50

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notfastenough wrote:
I have wondered whether my missus wants me to sacrifice more than other guys have to, so it's nice to hear of others juggling to manage their priorities. My 4 month old twins are hard work, so I'm currently lucky to squeeze 2 30mile rides into a week.

I enjoy club rides, but think even when they're a little older, I'm not that optimistic about being able to devote an entire Sunday morning to riding. Maybe the commute, the mid-week evening club ride and a few evening club 10s are where my future is. I'd be happy with that.

That's pretty much where I'm at too. Usually commutes 4 days per wk (25miles ish per day), one evening chaingang on a Tuesday (in summer) then one Saturday morning ride. Maybe totals 8hrs tops. The Saturday club ride is usually cut out a weekend or more per month, the commute is usually trimmed depending on work deadlines too.

Twitter: @velosam

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posted by SamShaw [252 posts]
10th March 2014 - 15:00

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There is nothing nicer than seeing your children following you at a sport of their choice and their liking (rather than being Mini-Mees, "...I never made it me lad.... but you will make it instead") and if they do choose cycling (assuming their tribe colours matches yours, i.e., them liking cross or track when you prefer Audax or road), then you could be looking forward to the green shoots of decades of shear pleasure of cycling with your kids and a bond beyond kinship and the perpetually open chequebook. Funnily enough, I got into cycling after my kids got into it, envying their Islabikes when all I had was a rusty mountain bike off eBay, and yesterday I did 17.6m with my 11y, whilst he was trying to teach me how to trackstand at every country crossroad, insisting that his MTB cleats trump my SPDs. My 13y old doesn't like riding. My 7y old is desperate to get into her cleats and do the rollers unaided.... Beats me beating myself with LSSE (low Strava Self Esteem).... I'd rather have that, than obsessive striving to convert my 16 mph average to 17mph.... But I was never good enough, let alone a racer.... And btw tennis is their primary sport.... So, for me, kids may well become my next "pass".... "We are off now darling, I got the lime for the G&Ts when we get back" (for our pre-Sunsay roast recovery grub....). Happy days....

posted by Konstantine [13 posts]
11th March 2014 - 1:48

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Was in the LBS recently picking up some bits and bobs. Guy at the counter was getting his two year old son a small-person bike, because the kid kept trying to climb up onto dad's road bike.

Had had a crappy day at work, and this made my day.

posted by Argos74 [284 posts]
11th March 2014 - 8:21

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Konstantine wrote:
There is nothing nicer than seeing your children following you at a sport of their choice and their liking (rather than being Mini-Mees, "...I never made it me lad.... but you will make it instead") and if they do choose cycling (assuming their tribe colours matches yours, i.e., them liking cross or track when you prefer Audax or road), then you could be looking forward to the green shoots of decades of shear pleasure of cycling with your kids and a bond beyond kinship and the perpetually open chequebook. Funnily enough, I got into cycling after my kids got into it, envying their Islabikes when all I had was a rusty mountain bike off eBay, and yesterday I did 17.6m with my 11y, whilst he was trying to teach me how to trackstand at every country crossroad, insisting that his MTB cleats trump my SPDs. My 13y old doesn't like riding. My 7y old is desperate to get into her cleats and do the rollers unaided.... Beats me beating myself with LSSE (low Strava Self Esteem).... I'd rather have that, than obsessive striving to convert my 16 mph average to 17mph.... But I was never good enough, let alone a racer.... And btw tennis is their primary sport.... So, for me, kids may well become my next "pass".... "We are off now darling, I got the lime for the G&Ts when we get back" (for our pre-Sunsay roast recovery grub....). Happy days....

Sounds great! Especially that they influenced you!

The idea of "encouraging" the kids so you can get out is one to remember too. Big Grin

Twitter: @velosam

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posted by SamShaw [252 posts]
11th March 2014 - 10:11

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Argos74 wrote:
Was in the LBS recently picking up some bits and bobs. Guy at the counter was getting his two year old son a small-person bike, because the kid kept trying to climb up onto dad's road bike.

Had had a crappy day at work, and this made my day.

That was me 3 weeks ago...

Twitter: @velosam

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posted by SamShaw [252 posts]
11th March 2014 - 10:11

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If I was getting enough time on the bike, I was feeling guilty about not spending enough time with the kids... If I felt I was spending some quality time with the kids, I was worrying about all the work that my friends/rival racers were putting in while I was building towers out of Lego.

I don't really race, but know exactly where you are coming from here. In September 2012 I rode across the Alps, and spent much of the preceding year training for that, with a string of big sportives as prep events beforehand - also putting in mileage on days before and after those.

From late Winter onwards I was putting in a 70 or 80 mile ride every weekend - religiously. My wife and children (6, 4 and 1 at the time) were very patient with me, but 50-60 miles into a ride, knowing I was going to be out for another hour or so, I would start to worry about whether the kids were behaving, feeling the guilt of leaving my wife to deal with it all. And missing my kids.

That kind-of carried on through early last year, but then my very-tolerant wife asked me to take a year out - no sportives, no trips, nothing I would need to train for. That year started the day after the RideLondon100, and is being affectionately referred to as my 'doping ban'.

I'm a stone heavier, have only been over 50 miles once or twice since last August, but it's not been quite the torture I feared it was going to be. I guess the recent weather keeping all my mates indoors too has given me some solidarity.

I've rediscovered my mountain bike, now maintaining a happy balance between fat and skinny. I've been riding with the kids more. And I've taken on a voluntary MTB secretary role with my club, as well as getting involved with the youth coaching - my eldest attending.

I'm looking forward to my doping ban ending, but don't think I'll be planning anything that requires quite the amount of training mileage for some time.

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posted by andyspaceman [216 posts]
12th March 2014 - 18:11

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So many things I'd like to say having read this.

On one level its great to know I'm not alone in the battle of guilt... Guilt that self generated, guilt that the missus generates in abundance...

On the other level its depressing to know that we are all in the same boat... and that actually, from that, the consensus must be that yes, we are extracting the urine from the family unit with our selfish activities. I'd always clung to the idea that I had a high maintenance missus, and if everyone else did it, then its OK.

I've seen some gents hang up the hoops, I've seen others put their foot down, whilst others have striven for a suitable compromise. The irony of it all, is that no matter what action these gents have taken, the ones that have ultimately separated from the other half have ended up happier, with more time for the bike, and curiously, with more dedicated time with their kids.

Spending more time with the kids is why I'm hanging up the safety pins at the end of this season, but at the same time, I am already feeling guilty that by stopping the sport, I won't be showing them the joy of sport, and the importance of dedication.

You honestly can't win... I think is my point, just do what feels right and fair. Have fun.

posted by Jimmy Ray Will [248 posts]
13th March 2014 - 17:59

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Jimmy Ray Will wrote:
I think is my point, just do what feels right and fair. Have fun.

Nail on the head. Although the kids will still see the joy of it and dedication - I'll still be out training in the mornings and riding with the club at weekends. Even at 2, my lad tells me he's exercising (whilst jumping off the back of the sofa Worried ).

My wife's not pressuring me on this, it's a decision that I made - obviously she's happy about there being less days away. I'm not one of those who would end up happier without their wife!

Twitter: @velosam

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posted by SamShaw [252 posts]
13th March 2014 - 18:15

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Jimmy Ray Will wrote:

On the other level its depressing to know that we are all in the same boat... and that actually, from that, the consensus must be that yes, we are extracting the urine from the family unit with our selfish activities. I'd always clung to the idea that I had a high maintenance missus, and if everyone else did it, then its OK.

I've seen some gents hang up the hoops, I've seen others put their foot down, whilst others have striven for a suitable compromise. The irony of it all, is that no matter what action these gents have taken, the ones that have ultimately separated from the other half have ended up happier, with more time for the bike, and curiously, with more dedicated time with their kids.

Spending more time with the kids is why I'm hanging up the safety pins at the end of this season, but at the same time, I am already feeling guilty that by stopping the sport, I won't be showing them the joy of sport, and the importance of dedication.

You honestly can't win... I think is my point, just do what feels right and fair. Have fun.

I wouldn't be happier without my family, and I love seeing my babies every day. Twice a week or whatever would do me in.

Importantly though, I really don't think we are taking the pi$$ with our selfish hobby. Everyone needs a bit of personal space to clear their head. I've ALWAYS been very clear to my wife that exercise and training (in whatever sport) are in important part of my life, and while my missus isn't as keen on exercise, she is massively keen that the babies take after me rather than her when it comes to physical activity. Keep plugging away at the compromises.

Last night I would have considered trading a very loud baby for a really nice bike.

posted by notfastenough [3066 posts]
13th March 2014 - 18:50

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This is a lovely post. Pre-kids i remember wondering what all the fuss was about, and couldn't quite understand how those of my mates who'd become dads suddenly found it so hard to get out for a ride. Now, much as i enjoy 5 hours in the saddle, it does tend to feel like a waste of some good quality time with the kids.

As for the suggestion above about getting out for a ride before the kids get up in the morning, in my case that would involve heading out for a ride at about 3am!!!

(come on...a bit of sympathy for 3 years without a lie in!! Yawn )

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posted by ragtimecyclist [125 posts]
13th March 2014 - 21:17

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I distinctly remember the shift from waking up on a Sunday morning and seeing a beautiful summers day and instead of a sensation of joy at the prospect of the bike ride ahead, you feel bad about not being able to share that time with the kids... in many ways I prefer going out in the cold now.

posted by Jimmy Ray Will [248 posts]
14th March 2014 - 12:33

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Really great post. I don't race, but am in a similar situation with fitting rides (and running) in with family time. I can never seem to drag myself out of bed early enough at the weekends to get a proper early start for my ride though Confused

When my wife went back to work after having our first (who's now 6) we decided to both reduce our hours at work and switch to 4 days. I stay home on a Monday and my wife's home on a Friday. That worked brilliantly and gave us both quality time with our daughter before she started school, and now our son (2.5yrs). When he starts school in a couple of years, I'm going to carry on with a 4 day week, and I'll have a day to myself every week when I can go out riding all day without it affecting anyone else Smile

posted by graham_f [95 posts]
21st March 2014 - 18:02

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Ross K wrote:
It's a tough one. My kids are 1 and 4, so I want to spend as much time with them as possible (as my wife wants me to too!).

My solution has been mentioned already which is more or less the only one available to me - a decent light (Exposure Toro in my case) and the rather underrated experience of night time training, all on rural backroads, after kids' bedtime.

Here, here. There is something very special about night riding. I'm very lucky in that I'm surrounded by quiet rural back roads with very little light pollution. There is something mesmerising about cycling in that tiny bubble of light with total isolation from every other distraction. It's about you, the bike and the next few seconds; requiring total concentration. Maybe I just need better lights?

As a bonus in this total darkness a car can be seen coming from miles away so no (less) nasty surprises around the next bend. Just watch out for the rabbits!

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posted by brokenorange [15 posts]
22nd March 2014 - 1:30

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change your plan, start doing audax? why take one day away from the kids when you can do three!

posted by VeNT [37 posts]
31st March 2014 - 13:13

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I adopt the late night ride approach too, that way I get to do all the fun stuff like bath time, story time and bedtime. Then I don my lycra and head out for a couple of hours. I live in a fairly rural area so can see any cars from miles away, just have to keep a keen eye for foxes, badgers and bunnies.

posted by jgmacca [10 posts]
4th April 2014 - 9:46

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I went from training 5 times a week in one sport, to doing nowt as I got to the age where 'life' takes priority. Just make sure you plan in your time to still enjoy cycling and keeping fit, as it will benefit you and your kids when they're old enough to go out with dad. I just stopped completely for almost 2 years, got fat and right miserable! Now I know it's important to plan in advance and find time; to get in some exercise and to keep periodically doing something you enjoy.

I have a question for you though Sam; I just read your blog entry on your BC point gained last year, saw you mention your physical turnaround. I'm on a similar turnaround, going from rugby player to cyclist.
At what point did you join a club, and feel comfortable to keep with their weekly routes? I'm out around the Bathgate hills, 40-50k every Sunday, climbing around 500m gain but doing it at a casual 22/23 kph. No real reason to hurry - I like to cycle and look around as I do it.

I think I would struggle to ride at 24 mph for example, as you mentioned is the speed of your chaingang. How did you bridge from the point where you were losing weight and able to get up climbs, to being able to maintain a high pace and being competent at climbs?
Right now I think I need the challenge of a group and pace-setting to push me, but if I joined a club I'd get dropped on the climbs so it'd be kind of pointless.

posted by ike2112 [8 posts]
9th April 2014 - 1:18

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+1 for night riding - we now have a group of 5 or 6 who head out on Thursdays at 8pm for 2 - 2 1/2 hrs. Most of us have the £20 eBay Cree LED's. Nightriding is far more relaxed - hardly any traffic, and they don't know what you are or think you're a combine harvester or something so often pull right over and stop. Heh.

I was told there would be Cake. Luckily there's http://TestValleyCC.org.uk

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posted by KiwiMike [463 posts]
9th April 2014 - 7:49

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ike2112 wrote:
I have a question for you though Sam; I just read your blog entry on your BC point gained last year, saw you mention your physical turnaround. I'm on a similar turnaround, going from rugby player to cyclist.
At what point did you join a club, and feel comfortable to keep with their weekly routes? I'm out around the Bathgate hills, 40-50k every Sunday, climbing around 500m gain but doing it at a casual 22/23 kph. No real reason to hurry - I like to cycle and look around as I do it.

I think I would struggle to ride at 24 mph for example, as you mentioned is the speed of your chaingang. How did you bridge from the point where you were losing weight and able to get up climbs, to being able to maintain a high pace and being competent at climbs?
Right now I think I need the challenge of a group and pace-setting to push me, but if I joined a club I'd get dropped on the climbs so it'd be kind of pointless.

First thing for me was putting in time on the bike; 1 hour or so per day before work, then 3-4hrs on Saturday, usually racking up 8-9hrs per week. When I got to the point I was cycling at 17-18mph average on my own, I then started riding with the club. I started in the middle group but soon moved up to the faster guys. Riding a club ride isn't too difficult, but a chaingang is a different beast altogether, it's like one massive interval session, without recovery! Essentially it's like a race, but clubs run development groups which will teach you good bike handling skills and there should be a pace to suit your ability.

Best thing to do is find a local club and go out on their slowest ride, our club has rides that go at 13-14mph for about 35-40miles, it's a great way to get people into cycling without the fear of getting dropped. Nobody gets left behind. Pedal Power (West Calder) have rides to suit everyone, check out this thread, and also look for their Facebook page http://www.pedalpowerrt.site50.net/showthread.php?tid=101 I also think West Lothian Clarion have a good range of rides. Don't be fearful of trying out clubs and seeing which one you like before you join.

One thing you should do is have a go - you'll find that people are welcoming and will be happy to pass on what they know and enjoy seeing you develop.

PS. we went up the Bathgate Alps on Saturday - the first time for me and it was an eyeopener - the ride up to Beecraigs out of Linlithgow is brutal!

Twitter: @velosam

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posted by SamShaw [252 posts]
9th April 2014 - 9:56

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@ ike2112

It would also be good if you posted up on the forum how you get on - I'm sure people would be interested to read of your experience, I would anyway!

Twitter: @velosam

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posted by SamShaw [252 posts]
9th April 2014 - 10:19

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ike2112 wrote:
I went from training 5 times a week in one sport, to doing nowt as I got to the age where 'life' takes priority. Just make sure you plan in your time to still enjoy cycling and keeping fit, as it will benefit you and your kids when they're old enough to go out with dad. I just stopped completely for almost 2 years, got fat and right miserable! Now I know it's important to plan in advance and find time; to get in some exercise and to keep periodically doing something you enjoy.

I have a question for you though Sam; I just read your blog entry on your BC point gained last year, saw you mention your physical turnaround. I'm on a similar turnaround, going from rugby player to cyclist.
At what point did you join a club, and feel comfortable to keep with their weekly routes? I'm out around the Bathgate hills, 40-50k every Sunday, climbing around 500m gain but doing it at a casual 22/23 kph. No real reason to hurry - I like to cycle and look around as I do it.

I think I would struggle to ride at 24 mph for example, as you mentioned is the speed of your chaingang. How did you bridge from the point where you were losing weight and able to get up climbs, to being able to maintain a high pace and being competent at climbs?
Right now I think I need the challenge of a group and pace-setting to push me, but if I joined a club I'd get dropped on the climbs so it'd be kind of pointless.

Although I wasn't looking to lose weight, when I got back into cycling I was lacking general fitness. I built up to joining a club by doing a combination of long steady rides and shorter rides (1 hour) where I would take it easy for the first 15 minutes, then do a few bursts of a couple of minutes at a higher pace with a few minutes break in between, then as quick as I could sustain for the last 20 minutes. Also, practise pedalling fluidly - rather than pushing down on the downstroke (this happens anyway), pushforwards in the top third of the pedal stroke, and drag your foot backwards (like you're scraping dog muck off your shoe) in the bottom third of the pedal stroke.

When I joined a club, it was a bit of an eye-opener. The pace generally was on the quick side for me, but just about manageable. I'd get dropped on the climbs, but that's ok because the group strings out a bit anyway, then regroups at the top or the next turn-off. The shock to the system, though, was the mental aspect of focusing on holding a wheel, considering the riders behind when navigating potholes etc.

I thought I didn't have weight to lose, but dropping 4kg and riding a lot did wonders for my climbing (no surprise there!).

To be honest, you just need to crack on and try it, because here's the thing: If it turns out that the group suits you and don't mind waiting at the top if you get dropped, then you'll have your target to aim for. First, you'll be trying to keep the next guy in front just in sight. Then you'll try and stay with him. Then you'll try and keep the next guy in sight... etc. You'll find who climbs at what pace - I know that I used to be happy to be able to climb with Paul, but once I started to add cycle commutes to my routine, a couple of months later I could suddenly climb with Kevin, etc.

One other thing - I always read that the fat-burning intensity is surprisingly low, but I could swear that my weight started to come off once I had the legs for the 20-30min chaingang at the end of the club run. That's really quite intense, but don't fear it (if the club you choose does this) because the main thing is that once you can keep up, it's such a buzz that it's addictive. You look forward to the mad painful scrap at the end!

Good luck, let us know how you get on.

Last night I would have considered trading a very loud baby for a really nice bike.

posted by notfastenough [3066 posts]
9th April 2014 - 11:05

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notfastenough wrote:
One other thing - I always read that the fat-burning intensity is surprisingly low, but I could swear that my weight started to come off once I had the legs for the 20-30min chaingang at the end of the club run. That's really quite intense, but don't fear it (if the club you choose does this) because the main thing is that once you can keep up, it's such a buzz that it's addictive. You look forward to the mad painful scrap at the end!

Completely agree with this.

The other thing I used to do, up until a couple of weeks ago, was to sit on and try to wait for the sprint at the end... not sure for what reason other than to try and "win". Recently, I've started to stick in some do-or-die attacks, try to ride off the front, get people behind you working hard, put them under pressure. It doesn't work, but it really is bloody good fun and much better than sitting in trying to conserve energy for the last 100m to the 30 signs!

Twitter: @velosam

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posted by SamShaw [252 posts]
9th April 2014 - 11:20

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A lot of our guys sit in the wheels and wait for the sprint at the end. That's all over too quickly, much better to get a proper move on 20 minutes before - when cars don't pass anymore I know we're flying!

Last night I would have considered trading a very loud baby for a really nice bike.

posted by notfastenough [3066 posts]
9th April 2014 - 11:54

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The more you do, the more you try, the stronger you get, so it's worth putting in the effort to keep on attacking. The buzz of really pushing yourself, instead of sitting there worrying about when to put your effort in, is much more satisfying.

Twitter: @velosam

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posted by SamShaw [252 posts]
9th April 2014 - 12:15

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to get back to the original post..
our kids are a little older (13+) my wife now comes out with me, so it's a case of "where are mummy and daddy going"..snigger , guffaw , etc. this is great for all of us, as the kids get some freedom from we parents and we get some freedom from the kids!
my missus has lost weight, gained fitness and descends like a demon...on the bike. the kids are more independent and we are all seeing the benefit of getting out on two wheels and doing something outside of the general family stuff. We don't belong to a cycling club , but we do ride with a Triathlon club which adds some pep to our rides..we have to push to keep up,they're a competitive bunch..but it's good to push hard and we both know we have improved. and the kids wonder what all the fuss is about....

keith roberts's picture

posted by keith roberts [179 posts]
14th April 2014 - 22:33

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