• Road bike filth from De Rosa, Wilier, Argon 18, Cervélo, Deda, Time, Orbea, Ridley…11 hours 33 min agoIs it just me that was

    Is it just me that was slightly confused by Carrera bikes that aren't Halfords specials?

  • Great shared cycle path network in Edinburgh, shame about the cyclists.11 hours 34 min agoCould be the one here? Right

    Could be the one here? Right beside a school and plenty of walkers, sounds about right from how I know the area. Never cycled it though.

    http://www.strava.com/segments/5175360

  • Anatomy of a lie: How Guide Dogs London fabricated an attack on cyclists11 hours 38 min agoPretty shameful work by

    Pretty shameful work by GDBA's press office.

    I used to have links to them - we 'puppy walked' a couple of dogs when I was younger. I'd go so far as to say they were my favourite charity, as they deal in quality of life. Well, consider that goodwill "smashed into".

    Wouldn't it be ironic if they were fundraising money from cyclists? Oh. http://www.guidedogs.org.uk/microsites/events/find-an-event/cycling/prud...

  • Vuelta Stage 611 hours 40 min agoBreak looks like it will be

    Break looks like it will be caught. Orica working so obviously believe in Matthews. He could hold onto the jersey with 13 second lead. It's only about 3.75k!

  • Vuelta Stage 611 hours 43 min agoGot Martin Quintana Kelderman

    Got
    Martin
    Quintana
    Kelderman

    Plus
    Matthews
    Martens
    Mas

    Others won't figure. Wouldn't be surprised if Matthews does ok today although Montecassino was a touch easier but longer. Keeping him for tomorrow which suits him more as I don't want to take pens yet. Martens could make top 20 today, maybe, more for tomorrow as well. Keeping back a couple of cheap sprinters for 8 as well and need to get rid of Wyss soon.

  • Great shared cycle path network in Edinburgh, shame about the cyclists.11 hours 44 min agoThanks Poptart242, Roseburn

    Thanks Poptart242, Roseburn Craigleith

  • 1 in 4 guide dogs in London have been struck by a cyclist, says charity11 hours 51 min agoFluffyKittenofTindalos

    FluffyKittenofTindalos wrote:
    levermonkey wrote:

    Please look closely at the sign in the picture used to illustrate this story. It's a double negative. It says "You must only proceed past this point if you are riding a bicycle and/or have a dog with you, but the dog must not be a guide-dog." Laughing

    Huh? Surely it says 'no bikes or dogs past this point, except guide dogs'. The only question is whether the exception applies to the bike ban or just the dog ban, i.e. are guidedogs on bikes allowed?

    No. A sign saying "No dogs or cycles past this point" would be a circular sign with a red border and black pictograms of a cycle and a dog on a white field. The red diagonal cancels this and affirms the opposite. Have a look in your highway code, in particular those signs which ban motor vehicles or cycles. Big Grin

  • 1 in 4 guide dogs in London have been struck by a cyclist, says charity11 hours 54 min agoPete B wrote:brooksby

    Pete B wrote:
    brooksby wrote:

    One statistic I do find quite sad, is that in London there are 41,000 registered blind or partially sighted, but there are only 320 Guide Dogs. /quote]

    I am sure that they could use a few more. However, not all blind people or even partially sighted people want a guide dog. The subset of blind people that can usefully use and want a Guide dog is quite small. Most partially sighted or registered blind people are so because they are old. Then there are people suffering from other disabilities related to blindness. (some older diabetics for example are prone to suffer diabetic retinopathy).

    Some people are not mobile on foot. Some people are not suited to looking after a dog or live in accommodation that is not suitable for a dog.

    A dog is most useful to an otherwise fully fit responsible adult living in appropriate acommodation for keeping a dog and who want one. I bet there's more than a few hundred or so in London but your assumption that every blind person has use of, could keep or even wants a Guide dog is misplaced.

  • 1 in 4 guide dogs in London have been struck by a cyclist, says charity11 hours 54 min agoPete B wrote:brooksby

    Pete B wrote:
    brooksby wrote:
    ...

    Is that a serious question ? But I’ll give an answer.

    I thought it was universal knowledge that blind / visually impaired carry a white stick. Perhaps they might not have a white stick if they are been guided by a dog. In which case it is obvious that it is a Guide Dog, as instead of a lead the person will be holding what can be best described as a handle that is attached to a harness on the dog. Not always, but usually Guide Dogs also have some sort of hi-viz jacket or have a hi-viz band on the harness.

    It actually was a serious question.

    I know all about white sticks, and guide dogs. But someone can be visually impaired, and basically not able to see properly, and not have a stick or a guide dog. A bloke I know from college is like that (I know that sounds like a cliche, but it is true).

    I will try and look out for someone with a white stick or a guide dog on a harness by the side of the road (when also trying to look out for evil white van drivers), but I cannot know for certain whether someone intends to cross. It worries me that am I more likely to freak someone out, if they cannot see - properly, or at all - and suddenly a bell starts ringing close by?

  • Decisions for my new F812 hours 2 min agoIf you're going from a CAAD8

    If you're going from a CAAD8 and corresponding wheels, you're going from a 4 to a 9.8 with the Shamals, will you really notice the 0.05 extra that tubular a give you over decent clinchers?

  • Anatomy of a lie: How Guide Dogs London fabricated an attack on cyclists12 hours 3 min agoarmb wrote: Pedestrians

    armb wrote:

    Pedestrians crossings (at least some of them) make a noise precisely so blind users know when the lights are green for pedestrians.

    Going OT, a lot of lights no longer make any noise, the ones near me rely on a small cone under the box, if you feel it, it rotates when the lights change to alert that it is now safe to cross, i guess it helps deaf and blind in one step?????

  • Anatomy of a lie: How Guide Dogs London fabricated an attack on cyclists12 hours 22 min agoHmmmm. The stats are

    Hmmmm. The stats are certainly dodgy, to say the least. This is a reasonably good entry for anyone interested in telling good from bad stats.

    But I'm more interested in what the guide dog campaign group's agenda is - unlike, say, the Daily Fail's, I'm not predisposed to seeing evil here.

    Perhaps consider holding the cannons? The blind are not our natural enemies, if we can avoid a fight it might be best to do so.

  • Great shared cycle path network in Edinburgh, shame about the cyclists.12 hours 22 min agoEdinburgh cyclist here. Which

    Edinburgh cyclist here. Which path in particular are you talking about?

    There's one in particular from Hermiston Gait through to Stenhouse that I avoid like the plague - it's segregated use (with a huge white line and painted bikes every 20 feet) but try telling that to all of the pedestrians who happily veer across without looking. Even at low speeds you can come to grief if you're clipped in.

    Happy to flag up on Strava, I don't bother hunting when there are pedestrians using the same route. Just not cricket IMO.

    Edit: Just found one here.The KOM has an average speed of 50kmph. On a shared path that's lunacy.

  • 1 in 4 guide dogs in London have been struck by a cyclist, says charity12 hours 23 min agobrooksby wrote:"Guide Dogs

    brooksby wrote:
    "Guide Dogs says that cyclists should ... call out or use a bell to alert pedestrians waiting to cross the road to their presence."

    I'm a little confused here. How am I to know whether someone is blind/visually-impaired?

    Should I ring my bell for every person who is standing by the roadside, just in case they cannot see me and just in case they were going to cross the road? Many (presumably) not visually-impaired pedestrians will often just step out without looking or listening.

    In that case, should motorists also be driving around hooting their horn all the time too (oh wait, they do).

    Is that a serious question ? But I’ll give an answer.

    I thought it was universal knowledge that blind / visually impaired carry a white stick. Perhaps they might not have a white stick if they are been guided by a dog. In which case it is obvious that it is a Guide Dog, as instead of a lead the person will be holding what can be best described as a handle that is attached to a harness on the dog. Not always, but usually Guide Dogs also have some sort of hi-viz jacket or have a hi-viz band on the harness.

    Anyway no matter what the statistics are, I think it is awful that there are any people on bikes that are frightening blind people even to the point the blind person is fearful going out.

    One statistic I do find quite sad, is that in London there are 41,000 registered blind or partially sighted, but there are only 320 Guide Dogs. Perhaps the Guide Dog association have done a PR disaster by trying to use “sensationalism” to draw attention to their “Cycleyes Campaign” in a way that has got some cyclists backs up. I hope it doesn’t discourage cyclists taking part in sponsored rides ect to help them fund more Guide Dogs. All the campaign is asking for, is for cyclists to be considerate and appreciate the difficulties blind and partially sighted people have.

    On a positive note of blind people and cycling, where I am there is a group that regularly takes blind people out cycling on tandems Smile

  • Anatomy of a lie: How Guide Dogs London fabricated an attack on cyclists12 hours 25 min agoGood work John. From the way

    Good work John. From the way you were going on Twitter I was expecting this article to be a stream of profanities (well, "gonads" aside).

    I recently had the chance to do some visual impairment awareness training and I'd recommend it to anyone. I now know there are 7.5 million people in the UK who are blind or have some form of uncorrectable visual impairment. That's a MASSIVE chunk of the population who have to face hostile street conditions every time they venture out of the door.

    Blind people are concerned about a lot of the same things as cyclists, such as "traffic flow smoothing" measures aimed at forcing through yet more traffic, or fashionable "shared space" schemes which advocate switching off traffic lights and ripping out kerbs. When they try and get something done about these, they get the same response cyclists get, or parents who want their kids to be able to play in the street - Eric Pickles and his ilk telling them that cars drive the UK's economy, and constraining them to improve everyone's quality of life would be economic suicide.

    I fully expect whatever spotty whizzkid thought up this survey to go on to a successful career in the charity sector, and probably end up as an advisor to a mainstream political party.

  • Anatomy of a lie: How Guide Dogs London fabricated an attack on cyclists12 hours 25 min agobabybat wrote:it seems like

    babybat wrote:
    it seems like Guide Dogs have set out to set one group of vulnerable road users against another, and make out that all cyclists are guilty of this kind of behaviour.

    Yet there are some tossers on road.cc who seem to think that all motorists are as guilty as each other.

    Funny ol' world, innit?

  • Eurobike show: The novel, the quirky & the downright daft12 hours 28 min agoAs usual folk think that

    As usual folk think that anything not a mountain bike or a racer is crap and inferior to everything else, wake up, not everybody wants to ride the above, some have other tastes, just because some bikes have an electric motor don't assume its only good for folk with disabilities, it pisses me off the small mindedness of some of the comments on this site, I have a beach cruiser, a 20 inch tricked up folding xootr swift which is very fast, a Raleigh shopper I just done up for sale and awaiting some old Moultons to do up, I love mini velo's but uk dealers are too scared to be different and break the trend to get any in the shops as they think EVERYBODY wants mtb's and race bikes, we don't, I have never and will never own a racer, mountain bikes I find uncomfortable also, I have arthritis in my back and knees and I am 42, trained for years in fitness and taught kickboxing the lot, please search the web, try to understand others needs in bikes, don't dismiss 20 inch wheeled bikes as being kids bikes, I still believe a vintage moulton bike is still banned from the velodrome since the 1960s as it embarrassed bikes with bigger wheels with the speeds it can do and recently a modern version has done just the same, what about the unfit overweight people who would like to get fitter, why cant they have a voice, is their money not good enough? cant old folks and less able bodied people who think they have to give up cycling be left to do so if there is an aid like electric bikes that would allow them to keep out in the great outdoors! snobbery and small minded comments is what further alienates peple against cycling in the first place and we have enough to deal with from other road users, everybody has a place on the roads, deal with it, maybe you may have an accident someday and need one of these bikes to get round on, I would love to see more mini velo's in the UK, gives people and kids other options from the norm. Happy cycling.

  • 1 in 4 guide dogs in London have been struck by a cyclist, says charity12 hours 30 min agodrfabulous0 wrote:If one in

    drfabulous0 wrote:
    If one in four guide dogs gets hit by a bikes then maybe they should get better guide dogs. It's not as if they can't hear them coming a lot sooner than a human.

    I believe you are thinking in terms of a quiet path. In that situation the dog will be able to hear a cyclist approaching and even the blind person would hear a cyclist before a sighted person would, as hearing is their primary sense to detect what is going on in the world around them.

    Though have a quick look at the video that goes with the Guide Dog association “Cycleyes Campaign”. It literally shows what a blind person waiting at a crossing on a busy city road sees (of course unlike you and I, it is nothing) and what their primary sense (hearing) detects. Then it repeats the scene and shows at the crossing there are dozens of cyclists that can’t be heard above all the background noise from traffic etc. Of course the dog can see the cyclists and knows they are there, but the dog relies on the cyclists stopping at the crossing when in theory it is safe to walk across.

    http://www.guidedogs.org.uk/cycleyes

  • Anatomy of a lie: How Guide Dogs London fabricated an attack on cyclists12 hours 32 min ago> " ... skip red lights at

    > " ... skip red lights at pedestrian crossings."
    > The reaction of one guide dog user I mentioned this to was: "How did they know, they're blind?" Well, quite.

    Pedestrians crossings (at least some of them) make a noise precisely so blind users know when the lights are green for pedestrians.
    If you're narrowly missed by a cyclist, especially a yelling one, it's not that hard to work out what they are just by sound, or with the sort of minimal vision that still counts as legally blind.
    Or there could simply have been sighted pedestrians on the same crossings at the same time who reported what they saw to the blind user.

    The story massively and unfairly exaggerated a handful of reports of cyclists behaving badly; that doesn't mean no cyclists at all ever behaved badly.
    Plenty of cyclists do sometimes go through red lights at crossings; a smaller number of them sometimes do so uncomfortably close to pedestrians, and without considering that a pedestrian might not be able to see them coming.

  • Anatomy of a lie: How Guide Dogs London fabricated an attack on cyclists12 hours 32 min agoI think we can all agree that

    I think we can all agree that riding on pavements, through red lights, and into blind people is bad, and should not be accepted. However, it seems like Guide Dogs have set out to set one group of vulnerable road users against another, and make out that all cyclists are guilty of this kind of behaviour.

    I really don't understand why LCC didn't think more carefully before getting involved - if they wanted an opportunity to work with Guide Dogs on a cooperative campaign and overcome some of the opposition within the organisation to good cycling infrastructure, why not try and show how really effective protected bike lanes reduce the risk to blind and partially sighted people? Why not campaign against rubbish shared pavements and road design that puts us in conflict?

    As you say, the elephant in the room is traffic - it's time to stop accepting it as an inevitability, and start seriously pushing for changes in the way our roads are designed, to make them safer and more welcoming for everyone, even if they're not on a bike.

  • Anatomy of a lie: How Guide Dogs London fabricated an attack on cyclists12 hours 33 min agoQuote:42 percent of 33 is

    Quote:
    42 percent of 33 is 13.86
    Ummm, while correct, the proper way of looking at it is that 14 out of 33 is 42.42424242%, which rounds down to 42%. Magic!

  • Anatomy of a lie: How Guide Dogs London fabricated an attack on cyclists12 hours 33 min agoWell done John for debunking

    Well done John for debunking yet another anti-cycling falsehood based on dubious evidence.

    Please send this to Tim Hartford on Radio 4's More or Less program, they will love ripping this little survey apart....

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006qshd

  • any good kit design websites?12 hours 39 min agoGive this a go:

    Give this a go: http://galibier.cc/custom-clothing/

  • what are the benefits of shaving your legs....seriously12 hours 39 min agoTo shave or not to shave.

    To shave or not to shave. Each to their own.

    I prefer to use leg and arm warmers instead of shaving. From very light warmers/sun guards in summer, to more warmer (Roubaix, Vuelta fabric etc) ones in winter. I wear them all year round.

    For me, this is a much easier way to achieve the same effect as shaving. Vanity doesn't interest me one iota.

    I also like the warmers/sun guards for their aero effect. As I live in a hot climate the warmers/guards also protect against sunburn. In addition, they wick moisture from the skin into the air - except when the humidity is high. They are perfect for days when the humidity is low or the air is dry.

    The warmers make my fat legs look slimmer (black colour only!) Devil

    On some rides other riders have tried to take the piss out of me. I honestly don't care what people think, it works for me Wink

  • First Ride: Ridley Fenix Disc combines cobble-munching comfort, speed & instant stopping12 hours 40 min agoQuote:As a way of

    Quote:
    As a way of highlighting the differences between the new pretenders with disc brakes and the old guard sticking to rim stoppers it’s totally effective.
    I'll admit to being not a fraction as knowledgeable on this subject as most/all here, but can anyone name the "old guard" that are not bringing out disc braked bikes? I thought that pretty much all of the majors had at least some of their line up with discs.

    The /real/ differentiator (IMO) is full adoption of through-axles. And in that regard at least, Ridley is distinctly old guard.