• Team GB stars shine at Revolution in Manchester1 year 16 weeks agoA great evening of racing.

    A great evening of racing. The men's scratch race was superb.

  • road.cc Superbike Shootout 2013-141 year 16 weeks agoWhat! No Spesh or Pina!? Then

    What! No Spesh or Pina!? Then I'm not talking to you Silly

    Wink

  • New Team Sky kit - would you wear it?1 year 16 weeks agoLooks like some sort of Ann

    Looks like some sort of Ann Summers role play kit. Lets play cyclists and....(?)!

  • crap drivers1 year 16 weeks agoI call them the 'getting away

    I call them the 'getting away with its'. Road safety, tax, law, benefits etc; there's always someone getting away with it. Numerous cars drive past you and you wonder how they passed an MOT. Unless the authorities 'grow some b#ll#cks' it won't change; all under the 'far too difficult' category.
    I was pulled over in the USA (Georgia) a few years ago for going slightly over the speed limit. The policeman scrutinised my licence and picked up on the fact that I had 3 speeding points that had long since expired. Ticked me off for not getting my licence updated. I was slightly speechless and promised to sort it out on my return to the UK. Mind you, a friend of mines over there for a few years and won't go out road cycling as the general opinion is that cyclists don't pay road tax and shouldn't be there. Nowhere's perfect.

  • New member with a broken arm1 year 16 weeks agoI broke a thumb a couple of

    I broke a thumb a couple of years back and ended up with a comically large plaster up to my wrist (no doubt to teach me to be more carfel in future).

    Anyway, i was recklessly impatient and went out on my bike again almost immediately - i didn't come off or anything, but the sweat that was generated in the plaster made for a pretty unpleasant and very itchy 4 weeks in the cast.

    Not recommended!

  • New member with a broken arm1 year 16 weeks agoFrom my experience of

    From my experience of breaking my wrist last year - you can't rush it. Definitely a case of resting it. Eat lots of calcium-rich foods (dark green veg like watercress, nuts etc) and get lots of vitamin D (synthetically or by sunshine) as that helps your body absorb it.

    And get a knitting needle or similar for those annoying itches.

  • Two thirds of lorries stopped by police are driven illegally or lack basic safety features1 year 16 weeks agoGizmo_ wrote:OldRidgeback

    Gizmo_ wrote:
    OldRidgeback wrote:
    I've also seen a paper revealing the crash rates for young males in the 17-24 age category that says 24% will have a crash of some sort. Seeing that sort of data does make you wonder why young males are allowed to drive at all. Sad

    If you banned males <25 from driving you would have to do so for females also. And then accident rates for 25-30 year olds would rise due to inexperience...

    Completely off topic, but one of the daftest ever Euro regulations was enforcing equal insurance rates for men and women. Women having cheaper insurance (in most cases) was 100% statistically defensible...

    Another vote that a vehicle found to be unroadworthy should be interrupted and impounded, and the owner given 30 days to effect repairs. It's simply unacceptable to have a 40-ton object on the roads that is not safe at any time.

    To be honest the law change made no real difference because now generally insurance companies just changed the way they apply it, in a sense it is based purely on risk and since a male will be at a higher risk they will still generally get charged more.

    It is no surprise this many lorries were caught with various issues, however it still won't stop cyclists ignoring the fact they should keep well clear of lorries and never ever go down the left side of one near junctions....rightly or wrongly there is only one looser in this scenario.

  • Pippa Middleton ditches the tennis skirt and learns to ride a bike1 year 16 weeks agothat conjures many images in

    that conjures many images in my head, all of them good....

  • Two thirds of lorries stopped by police are driven illegally or lack basic safety features1 year 16 weeks agoOldRidgeback wrote:I've also

    OldRidgeback wrote:
    I've also seen a paper revealing the crash rates for young males in the 17-24 age category that says 24% will have a crash of some sort. Seeing that sort of data does make you wonder why young males are allowed to drive at all. Sad

    If you banned males <25 from driving you would have to do so for females also. And then accident rates for 25-30 year olds would rise due to inexperience...

    Completely off topic, but one of the daftest ever Euro regulations was enforcing equal insurance rates for men and women. Women having cheaper insurance (in most cases) was 100% statistically defensible...

    Another vote that a vehicle found to be unroadworthy should be interrupted and impounded, and the owner given 30 days to effect repairs. It's simply unacceptable to have a 40-ton object on the roads that is not safe at any time.

  • Alberto Contador insists Michael Rogers is victim of food contamination1 year 16 weeks ago"The UCI needs to introduce

    "The UCI needs to introduce more robust measures to protect riders competing in China against tainted food."

    Here's a suggestion. Don't race in a country with an appalling human rights record, a lack of food safety standards and a complete lack of respect for international copyright.

  • Pippa Middleton ditches the tennis skirt and learns to ride a bike1 year 16 weeks agoSideBurn wrote:"Bike for a

    SideBurn wrote:
    "Bike for a better bum" I think this means something else in America Thinking Their bums need all the help they can get Smile

    I suppose in the US they would "Bike for a better fanny".

  • Pippa Middleton ditches the tennis skirt and learns to ride a bike1 year 16 weeks agoOf course.

    Of course.

  • road.cc Superbike Shootout 2013-141 year 16 weeks agoOne of the teams in the Tour

    One of the teams in the Tour Series rode the Raleigh this year, so if its good enough for them, I dare say its good enough for most of us.

    Its had some good write ups elsewhere too.

  • Pippa Middleton ditches the tennis skirt and learns to ride a bike1 year 16 weeks agoAnd there was I just hoping

    And there was I just hoping for a glimpse of a backside that, certainly at the time of the Royal Wedding, needed no improvement at all.

    Having said that, similarly well toned backsides would be an extraordinarily successful means of persuading more people to ride bikes. Day Dreaming

  • Two thirds of lorries stopped by police are driven illegally or lack basic safety features1 year 16 weeks agostumps wrote:Oldridgeback, i

    stumps wrote:
    Oldridgeback, i could have expanded the comment i made in that all cops can stop a vehicle for minor infringements such as lights out just in case it confused people. What i meant was serious offences to get a vehicle off the road.

    With your degree you are probably more highly qualified than most cops when it comes to defects but the training courses are just not available due to budgets and also they wont train a non motor patrol officer in PG9.

    It's a pity more police aren't given that training - a lot of those badly defective vehicles tend to be uninsured and also are being driven by people with no licences and who are engaged in criminal activity and who may be under the influence of drink or drugs. I've seen a paper that shows links between repeated driving offences and criminal activity and drug use. And such people have scarily high crash rates.

    I've also seen a paper revealing the crash rates for young males in the 17-24 age category that says 24% will have a crash of some sort. Seeing that sort of data does make you wonder why young males are allowed to drive at all. Sad

  • road.cc Superbike Shootout 2013-141 year 16 weeks agoI'm feeling a bit of

    I'm feeling a bit of nostalgic love towards that Raleigh at the moment.... I just wonder if it's nasty low grade carbon though, it's pricing seems too good!

  • Two thirds of lorries stopped by police are driven illegally or lack basic safety features1 year 16 weeks agoOldridgeback, i could have

    Oldridgeback, i could have expanded the comment i made in that all cops can stop a vehicle for minor infringements such as lights out just in case it confused people. What i meant was serious offences to get a vehicle off the road.

    With your degree you are probably more highly qualified than most cops when it comes to defects but the training courses are just not available due to budgets and also they wont train a non motor patrol officer in PG9.

  • Two thirds of lorries stopped by police are driven illegally or lack basic safety features1 year 16 weeks agostumps wrote:Just on a side

    stumps wrote:
    Just on a side note - you have to be qualified as A: a vehicle examiner to be authorised to identify defects and B: have to be whats commonly called PG9 trained to get a vehicle uplifted - daft i know but thats the type of red tape we have to deal with.

    I'm a vehicle examiner and undertook a 2 week course to qualify but i'm not PG9 trained (only motor patrols and a few ARV drivers are in our force) and as such i cant automatically get a vehicle uplifted.

    So if i see a dodgy vehicle i can stop it point out the defects and either report, arrest or ticket the driver but i then have to get a PG9 authorised cop, if they are available, to come along and serve the paperwork on the driver to get the vehicle uplifted.

    I cant comment on the Met as they might do things differently but when you see a cop at the roadside talking to a driver it does not automatically mean they have the power to get a vehicle uplifted. Bureaucracy at its best.

    Interesting bit of insight Stumpy as ever - it does sound like bureaucracy getting in the way of common sense. I've no training like yours but I'm an engineering graduate with a lot of experience of the road safety field and I see what I know to be unroadworthy vehicles on a daily basis. Most of those, with broken lights or flat tyres, can be quickly remedied. But I also see a lot of vehicle crabbing sideways down the road, probably due to defective tracking arising from a bump into a kerb in most instances. A few are obviously cut and shut jobs or have more serious chassis problems.

    I'm curious though since I can spot them so easily why there aren't more trained traffic officers policing the roads getting these dangerous vehicles off the street, but I expect this has a lot to do with budgets?

  • 2014 WorldTour bikes: Belkin’s Bianchi Oltre XR2 + Infinito CV1 year 16 weeks agoThe frame is horrible, but

    The frame is horrible, but look at the saddle and the yellow Rubinos. It's hideous!

  • New Team Sky kit - would you wear it?1 year 16 weeks agoWell if the masses can run

    Well if the masses can run along side the riders wearing flouro mankini's why cant the riders do the same ???

  • Two thirds of lorries stopped by police are driven illegally or lack basic safety features1 year 16 weeks agojova54 wrote:And the effect

    jova54 wrote:
    And the effect of this 'clampdown' is what?

    That a large number of defective vehicles have been removed from the roads? No!

    That a number of people driving without the correct permits or licences have been prosecuted and had their licences endorsed or removed? No!

    They got £200 fines and a cheery wave from the police and told 'not to do it again otherwise we might get very cross'.

    Another opportunity missed to rid our roads of the 75% of vehicles that are being operated illegally..

    I appreciate what your saying but you've rather jumped the gun and assumed thats whats happened because after wading through the article it does not say anything that you have quoted. They might have been uplifted, they might have been taken to court. All it says is that of the 821 stopped 243 got £200 fines and you have made the rest up.

  • Two thirds of lorries stopped by police are driven illegally or lack basic safety features1 year 16 weeks agoI bet most of the cycling

    I bet most of the cycling fines were them making up what they'd like to be "law".

    Refuse to pay.

  • Pippa Middleton ditches the tennis skirt and learns to ride a bike1 year 16 weeks agoIt's a trite anecdote, packed

    It's a trite anecdote, packed with all the stuff that puts off newcomers:

    Pippa thinks cyclists are "incredibly rude" and that they make her "nervous" because "they think they are the rightful rulers of the road".

    She then spends a few paragraphs describing how much expensive, specialist sports equipment is required to ride a bike, and describes the inconvenience of clipless pedals.

    This is followed by some absurd concerns around developing massive thighs and horrible talk about bike rollers, Garmins, energy gels and 'training'.

    She then signs off by glibly describing a road bike as a "sporting accessory" and says she "shall certainly be less intimidated by urban cyclists (at least those with manners)".

    Rubbish.

  • Pippa Middleton ditches the tennis skirt and learns to ride a bike1 year 16 weeks agofancynancy wrote:I know I

    fancynancy wrote:
    I know I will sound grumpy Waiting , but I don't think we need this. Women will hop onto bikes thinking its a ride in the country, not realising the dangers, just because Pippa can do it. On my commute into London I see too many ladies on cumbersome (fashionable) bikes taking silly risks through lack of knowledge. Sorry to be a grump Worried

    I understand where you are coming from, I hope, and it might have been an idea to point out some of the training/highway code stuff in the article. I know some would object, you don't need a licence, training etc etc, but a little bit about red light means stop same as in a car, asl's, about it being safe to hold your position in the traffic, not to undertake lorries, that sort of thing.

    Remember it is an article that I guess is aimed at women and it is women who seem to be getting killed by lorries in disproportionate numbers.

    It is a hard one, more riders= good, more riders ignoring the rules=bad.

  • Two thirds of lorries stopped by police are driven illegally or lack basic safety features1 year 16 weeks agojova54 wrote: And the effect

    jova54 wrote:

    And the effect of this 'clampdown' is what?

    That a large number of defective vehicles have been removed from the roads? No!

    That a number of people driving without the correct permits or licences have been prosecuted and had their licences endorsed or removed? No!

    They got £200 fines and a cheery wave from the police and told 'not to do it again otherwise we might get very cross'.

    ^ This.

    Off the road with them, right there and then - plus massive fines for the operators. I'm so sick of the ones who pose the biggest danger being let off the hook with a slap on the wrist.

    Thousands of people killed, hundreds of thousands injured. Every year. But hey, we must keep the goods rolling at a dumping price, right? This system is sick.