• Catalunya Stage 11 year 8 weeks agoTxurruka has gone off in

    Txurruka has gone off in pursuit of leaders

  • Not in my FRONT yard: Hinckley residents oppose cycle path... because it may stop them parking on the pavement1 year 8 weeks ago"I also think it would lead

    "I also think it would lead to people getting rid of their front gardens to create drives."
    Well we can't have people parking their cars on their own property can we...

  • New to Road cycling...1 year 8 weeks agoMy advice for a newcomer

    My advice for a newcomer would be unless you have a lot of disposable income to look for a second-hand bike to see how you like it first.

    If sufficient disposable income for a new bike I'd advise an alloy/aluminium frame to start and Shimano Tiagra is more than adequate for a beginner - the next level up (105) is into racing territory (I think Shimano goes 2300, Sora, Tiagra, 105, Ultegra, Dura Ace) The likes of Ribble do such a bike for £6/700 - or check out the similar recommendations on here.

    Go for a compact chainset (50/34 chainrings) and a decent sized cog at the back (28 up) if intending any hill riding when new. And as previous poster comments, often you can get a decent frame and spec, but the wheels are compromised, so worth keeping back some spare cash to upgrade them after a while.

    Clipless pedals are a huge benefit over flats so you will want to try them. If you haven't used them before you *will* fall off. So worth trying them on out your mountain bike first on some soft surfaces! (The *fall* is usually when you stop and try to unclip - so fine if toppling onto grass - or mud!)

    Frame size is mainly based around your leg length - one formula is - inside leg measurement (cm) x 0.69 - to give you an idea of optimum (horizontal) frame size - sloping top tubes are a bit trickier - but the manufacturer will usually supply the equivalent horizontal size. (There is a trend to go for smaller and smaller bikes with sloping top tubes, but personally I think it looks ugly)

  • Catalunya Stage 11 year 8 weeks agoGap down to 1'40'' with about

    Gap down to 1'40'' with about 45km to go

  • Not in my FRONT yard: Hinckley residents oppose cycle path... because it may stop them parking on the pavement1 year 8 weeks agoMore NIMBY'S it

    More NIMBY'S it seems.

    HOORAY, LET'S GAS EVERYONE ON PETROL FUMES?

    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.

  • Not in my FRONT yard: Hinckley residents oppose cycle path... because it may stop them parking on the pavement1 year 8 weeks agoNeil753 wrote: so the parking

    Neil753 wrote:
    so the parking space required per house is increasing all the time

    It would be interesting to know if that's actually true at a national level. I'm pretty certain London has actually seen that trend reverse slightly. Private car ownership appears to be in decline amongst the young here because it's simply so expensive once you factor in insurance costs.

    Most new housing in London is usually required to have fewer parking spaces than residents. My own borough seems to be fixated with installing as many sheffield stands for bikes as it possibly can, even though you would be insane to use them after dark. Anytime I see a bike left at one overnight, it's stripped of parts by the morning.

  • The battle of the CXes1 year 8 weeks agoFantastic Event

    Fantastic Event

  • Sergio Henao suspended by sky1 year 8 weeks agoWell that's about as a good a

    Well that's about as a good a take-down as I've read online recently. Bravo.

  • Catalunya Stage 11 year 8 weeks agoCat 3 1 Lemerchand 2 Vallee 3

    Cat 3
    1 Lemerchand
    2 Vallee
    3 Cheng
    3'22'' after 96km

  • Etape Cymru route to change after locals object to lack of access to villages1 year 8 weeks agoHave no strong opinion about

    Have no strong opinion about what is really a 'sporting' story rather than a cycling one, but can't help but observe that motorists and their high speeds, plus a lack of provision for anyone else, means many country roads are 'closed' to anyone not in a car, pretty much all of the time.

  • What pedals for my road/commuter?1 year 8 weeks agoSniffer wrote:Thought you

    Sniffer wrote:
    Thought you might like the Whyte Suffolk. Let us know how it works out for you.

    I commute on the A-530 pedals mentioned a couple of times. Work well for me. I think the issues of one sided pedals are overstated and you will get the hang of them very quickly.

    Good luck with the new bike.

    I realised on reading your comments I should have said that I ride A-520s rather than A-530s. Same principle applies though. The A-520s are unsuitable for riding without cleats, but are slightly sleeker.

  • Kickstarter campaign for bike with retro-reflective tech paintjob to get noticed at night (+ gallery & video)1 year 8 weeks agoI don't think this is an

    I don't think this is an original idea. And I have 'issues' with the political meaning of this lighting/reflective arms-race we seem to have on our roads. But I do actually like the aesthetic effect, personally (I've gone for reflective cloth and cable ties, myself).

  • Mudguard Policy1 year 8 weeks agoFrom my point of view my SKS

    From my point of view my SKS raceblades are more about keeping the people behind me in the club ride from getting a face full of mucky water (and other lovely substances that Norn Iron farmers have a habit of leaving on the roads). So perhaps the decision could be based around what kind of riding you are going to do if it is a bit wet? If on your own and you don't mind the brown streak up your back then keep them off but if you are riding in a group then on they go.

  • Not in my FRONT yard: Hinckley residents oppose cycle path... because it may stop them parking on the pavement1 year 8 weeks agopmanc wrote:Neil753

    pmanc wrote:
    Neil753 wrote:
    ...the parking space required per house is increasing all the time...

    But that's the problem, this isn't sustainable. The requirement eats into the safe public space which would have previously been available for walking and playing. And still people behave as if the world owes them as much parking space as they feel they need.

    This may well be true. I can think of one road where all the houses have driveways, _and_ there are parking bays painted on the pavement, and _still_ additional cars get parked on the remaining part of the pavement or doubled-up sticking out of the driveways. Its as if the number of cars each household owns increases to completely fill whatever parking space is available.

    But how can the trend be reversed?

    It does make me wonder about the constant cliche of 'the hard pressed motorist'. If they are so hard pressed why do they keep getting more-and-more cars?

  • Kickstarter campaign for bike with retro-reflective tech paintjob to get noticed at night (+ gallery & video)1 year 8 weeks agoSeems like a really

    Seems like a really complicated way to achieve what lights can do a lot easier

  • Mudguard Policy1 year 8 weeks agoDavid Arthur wrote:Why don't

    David Arthur wrote:
    Why don't you just leave the mudguards on your bike? No reason to take them off and put them on repeatedly as the weather changes, they hardly weigh anything at all and once set up properly don't make any noise or rub

    My beloved Raceblade Longs are 461g. They don't rattle and are strong enough to pick the bike up with, wheels and all, and come off in seconds.

    Somehow going out for a ride on a day where it's been dry for a while, is sunny with nothing forecast, seems 'wrong'. Maybe seems pessimistic? Belligerent?

    I can understand people who have to remove wheels and wield Allen keys not wanting to be on-off-on-off more than twice a year - if for no other reason than threads have a finite life. And those god-awful Crud ones that constantly rub and snap as soon as you look at them - I can understand you'd not want to touch them at all (OK Crud fans, YMMV - just scraping my own club anecdotes together)

    Not to get all Velomiati on yo' asses, but a nicely-packaged 'dry' bike is lovely and gives a certain mental boost - light as possible, etc etc. As is a typhoon-proof winter one keeping you dry, clean and happy. It's the half/half that seems not to be 'right'.

  • Shimano Ultegra 6800 groupset1 year 8 weeks agoI like the gun metal gray

    I like the gun metal gray color

  • Not in my FRONT yard: Hinckley residents oppose cycle path... because it may stop them parking on the pavement1 year 8 weeks agoNeil753 wrote:...the parking

    Neil753 wrote:
    ...the parking space required per house is increasing all the time...

    But that's the problem, this isn't sustainable. The requirement eats into the safe public space which would have previously been available for walking and playing. And still people behave as if the world owes them as much parking space as they feel they need.

    Many of us know that residences in town often don't come with bike storage nowadays, but we don't automatically feel we have a right to berate the council about it. What if I wanted to build a (van-sized) secure bike store on the public pavement outside my house? Is that OK?

    Can I demand the council subsidises my "requirement" for a private jet and provides me with somewhere to land it and store it?

  • New to Road cycling...1 year 8 weeks agoHamishB wrote:Morning

    HamishB wrote:
    Morning All,

    Thanks again for all your help.

    I am actually very unsure about clipless pedals, never liked the thought of them, but everyone, including you guys/girls have said how good they are so I think i'd be best to give them a try.

    Is there different 'options' types or is it only 1 type of clipless pedals? If more than one type, what would be the easiest/most popular/safest to get used to please?

    Take on board the aluminium bike thoughts in case of crashes, I hadnt factored that in, someone had said, go carbon. I'll look at a decent aluminium one too though now with carbon forks.

    Out of curiosity, I noticed a few of you refer to crashing... is it pretty common to be ending up off the bike?

    I've always thought road bikes looked quite tricky to ride/handle, do they take quite a lot of getting used to?

    My main reason for road cycling would be endurance, increase fitness stamina so thanks for mentioning there are bikes more suited to this.

    I do like the look of Specialized and Giant.

    On the groupsets etc, what are the different levels and what do you think is a good starting level for that? I've only really heard of Shimano, but take it there are others? Ideally looking for a set thats reliable, sturdy, replacements easily available and will do me as I improve?

    Sorry to come back with a load of questions, but thanks... I'd like to go into my LBS armed with a little knowledge while I get sized up. Not against an ex demo or even a bike that is new but previous year or two model if it helps get a better specc'd bike for the price.

    Cheers all,

    Hamish Smile

    There are different types of clipless pedals-for example Shimano make SPD and SPD-SLs. While SPD are normally thought of as mountain bike pedals many roadies use them as well since they are much easier to walk around in as opposed to the SPD-SLs which have a larger cleat and make walking a bit more of a challenge. The pros and cons of SPD vs SPD-SL are a well worn topic and really depends on what type of riding you do- I use SPD-SLs on my road bike and SPDs on my mountain bike since the type I have are flat on one side and have a clip on the other meaning I don't have to change shoes if I am just heading out to the shops on my MTB.
    Outside of Shimano there are also pedals and clipless systems from the likes of Speedplay and Look as well as others- all have their own disciples and the cleats fromn one type will not work with another- generally though if I was going to advise you I would say go for the SPD but check this out just to be sure.

    As for crashing-it depends on where you are riding, how you do it and what the roads are like. I've had one spill in the past couple of years but it was shall we say a "unique" situation! To be honest people who are afraid of coming off are more likely to since they tend to ride more tensed up and are less able to react quickly. You do get used to riding a road bike very quickly-it is always a pleasant suprise when you realise just how much quicker and lighter they are from an MTB-it is very noticable!

    As for groupsets- again opinions differ but the major ones are Shimano, SRAM and Campagnolo. Each will have their own preference and the group set will make up a fair chunk of the price of the bike you end up with. Each brand has different ranges- for Shimano bottom/entry level used to be 2300 (which is what I am still running) but there are now Tourney and another one which havbe been recently introduced at a lower level. Above that you will have 105, Sora, Tiagra, Ultegra, Dura-Ace (maybe not in that order but you get the idea) and Di2 (the electronic version)- that is why you may see a price difference between bikes that appear to be the same. SRAM and Campagnolo also have similar levels. Again your budget and what you want to get out of your riding will help you decide what groupset to go for. I still run 2300 but hope to upgrade in the next few months depending on whether I still have a job or not- it has been grand for my riding and while maybe not as smooth as the higher end stuff, I'm not climbing Mount Ventoux or challenging Cav or Kittel in a sprint.

    Don't forget as well that wheels can make a big difference to a bike-often the standard set you get with it when you first buy the bike are grand, but many people do move on to get lighter and better ones but again that is not a priority when starting out.

  • Not in my FRONT yard: Hinckley residents oppose cycle path... because it may stop them parking on the pavement1 year 8 weeks agoBikebikebike wrote:Neil753

    Bikebikebike wrote:
    Neil753 wrote:
    Every scheme that antagonises local residents launches a thousand punishment passes. The photos have been taken during the day when most people are at work, so give a false impression of parking need. We've all got to understand that many young adults share houses with parents, or share houses with their peers, so the parking space required per house is increasing all the time, so we shouldn't dismiss these residents' concerns.

    Oh bollocks to this. On-street parking is just another way that non-drivers subsidise people with cars.

    While I agree in theory with this, I think its a lost cause as those who feel entitled to such a subisidy are far too powerful politically to take on. People with cars now think they have a human right to park right outside their homes (I wish they'd show a bit more gratitude to those of us who make more space by _not_ having a car...logically we ought to be able to charge a fee for the use of the space we thus free up!)

    But I also think Neil753 is right that it would be far better in any case to just make the road itself safer for cycling, via strict speed limits and (best of all) partially bollarding it off to stop through traffic.

  • Catalunya Stage 11 year 8 weeks agoSprint 2 1 Vallee 2

    Sprint 2
    1 Vallee
    2 Lemarchand
    3 Lopez
    Lead 4' after85km

  • Tour Makers chosen for July's Tour de France Grand Départ1 year 8 weeks agoUnpaid work for the lucky

    Unpaid work for the lucky ones...

  • Katusha's Alexander Kristoff wins Milan-San Remo1 year 8 weeks agoTo any Garmin rider who

    Applause To any Garmin rider who finished wearing those awful POCcie blue aero helmets and glasses

  • SPD vs 3-bolt1 year 8 weeks agoThanks - that's what I

    Thanks - that's what I thought. As far as I can tell this Giro mtb shoe:
    http://www.giro.com/eu_en/products/men/cycling-shoes/gauge.html

    Is essentially the same as this road one:
    http://www.giro.com/eu_en/products/men/cycling-shoes/trans.html

    With the addiction of lugs on the sole and a couple of bumpers.

  • Catalunya Stage 11 year 8 weeks agoStandard: Carlos Alberto

    Standard:
    Carlos Alberto Betancur
    Julian David Arredondo
    Daniele Ratto
    Alberto Contador
    Luis Leon Sanchez
    Adam Yates
    Samuel Sanchez
    Koldo Fernandez
    Giampaolo Caruso

    Purist:
    Julian David Arredondo
    Tejay Van Garderen
    Christopher Froome
    Alberto Contador
    Marek Rutkiewicz
    Luis Leon Sanchez
    Samuel Sanchez
    Mattia Cattaneo
    Heiner Rodrigo Parra