• Details released of opening two stages of next May's Women's Tour1 year 13 weeks agoHoping to get a North East

    Hoping to get a North East stage. Cant jsut keep it all down south!

  • UCI Management Committee agrees Anti-doping audit and independent commission into wrongdoing1 year 13 weeks agostep-hent wrote:Just a

    step-hent wrote:
    Just a thought, but wouldn't the moment of election be a bit late for seizing all the files?

    Possibly, but it's not as if he had any power to do it earlier. Cleaning up mail servers/IT systems/backups selectively is probably no small job unless you trash the lot - plus people are often not very good at keeping their data tidy (I'm no exception) so there could be stuff squirrelled away, even unintentionally. Possibly any deletions might be retrievable, too.

  • DfT urged to change road design rules now or risk strangling David Cameron's 'Cycling Revolution'1 year 13 weeks ago@Tony agree with your

    @Tony

    agree with your comments

    the old "segregated" cycle lane was dual lane so running both northbound and southbound on the northbound side of Royal College Street (which is a one-way street)

    from what I understand, most collisions between vehicles and cycles occured from motorists looking right to check for oncoming vehicle traffic on the road, completely ignoring cyclists coming south on the cycle lane. There were also incidents between cyclists travelling northbound and motorists failing to acknowledge the "hard stop" junction and just rolling across into the road.

    the big problem with the new scheme is that the northbound cyclists still have this potential collision from motorists failing to stop, and have lost the protection of a hard, raised concrete strip to physically separate them from motor traffic going northbound alongside them.

    the new scheme has painted strips on the northbound that are inconsistent along the length of the lane, rubber "armadillo" bumper and bizarre metal plant pots (approx 1.5M long) to try and create an "open" space that is still cycle friendly.

    southbound is now on the right side of the road, and has a solid white line backed by car parking. Have already seen a number of collisions between southbound cyclists and motorists exiting vehicles into the cycle lane, especially couriers loaded with packages, or motorists turning without warning across the cycle lane into the bio-centre, vets college, Royal Mail, garage, etc.

  • Which UCI technical rules should be updated? We asked the experts1 year 13 weeks agoI don't get the double

    I don't get the double diamond thing. It looks like a double triangle to me.

    Anyway, I think the main thing is that the rules be as fair as possible, and that bikes remain bikes. The last thing I would want to see is cycling turning into the sort of farce which the America's Cup now is, with no-one knowing whether it will be a monohull, catamaran, trimaran etc and boats breaking up and sinking because they are designed only for speed. I want to watch the recognisable sport of professional cycling, not some weird science contest about human powered vehicles.

  • Which UCI technical rules should be updated? We asked the experts1 year 13 weeks agoYes but only because the

    Yes but only because the national socialists sorry FIA have banned them. Can see cycling going like formula 1 if the rules are relaxed too much and we will have 1 team/ rider winning everything.

  • Which UCI technical rules should be updated? We asked the experts1 year 13 weeks agoMercuryOne wrote:I love the

    MercuryOne wrote:
    I love the suggestion that lighter and lighter materials does not alter the safety of the bike. I don't own a carbon bike as the term 'catastrophic failure' isn't very reassuring. Carbon forks and other bits and pieces? Fine. But a whole bike whittled down to the weight of a feather is not as durable and as forgiving as a bike made of stronger materials. It just can't be and anyone who tells you otherwise forgets our human history of random icebergs and what cold weather does to booster rocket o-rings...

    Catastrophic failure on a carbon fork is going to have exactly the same (if not worse) effects that catastrophic failure of a frame yet you're happy to use them?

    F1 cars are made of carbon, the wings and a lot of the key structural components of modern passenger jets (Boeing 777, 787) are made of carbon fibre. There's nothing wrong with carbon fibre when used correctly, it can take way more force than steel or aluminium. Yes, it's fragile if you slam it into a wall at 40mph but then so is steel and aluminium.

    The issue they're getting at here is that the weight limit of 6.8kg is effectively strangling the possibility of exploring and innovating frame design much further. The limit, for those who are interested, was brought in before CF was common and when "weight" was the only variable - before people knew about nutrition and aerodynamics, you had riders drilling out frames and components which was dangerous and caused frame failures so the limit was designed to stop riders doing that. Obviously it's now woefully out of date but it was put in for the best intentions.

  • Trial of driverless pods on pavements of Milton Keynes heralds "science fiction future" (+ video)1 year 13 weeks agoSimon_MacMichael wrote: we'll

    Simon_MacMichael wrote:
    we'll look back in a century's time (well, our descendants will, anyway) at the late 20th and early 21st centuries in wonder at how a mass mode of transport was allowed to develop in which human error - or impatience, or negligence - led to the death or maiming of millions.

    I think you're bang on here Simon.

  • Trial of driverless pods on pavements of Milton Keynes heralds "science fiction future" (+ video)1 year 13 weeks agogazza_d wrote:"the vehicles

    gazza_d wrote:
    "the vehicles could transform Britain’s city centres, which could become further pedestrianised"

    Utter tosh. Cars, even small electric self driving cars are still bloody cars.

    This money would be much better spent improving the cycle network and a load of hire bikes.

    FFS.

    Depends how far you widen the scope doesn't it?
    Yes, they're still cars, but maybe it makes more sense if you start to think beyond the model of privately owned cars and how much space those cars demand. It's a lot for loads of big cars to transport one person somewhere and then sit around doing nothing for a few hours. If you replace all that with a fleet of small poddy type things like this then I think that would help to start to reclaim cities from private cars. You'd maybe need far less of them servicing lots of small trips very frequently than you have now where everybody wants their own.

    Obviously that sort of thing would be a massive cultural shift or challenge as well as an engineering one though. But it's definitely worth looking at IMO, which is what they're doing here it sounds like.

  • Sportful Fiandre Norain Bib Tights (2014)1 year 13 weeks agomp31 wrote:Nice shoes BTW...

    mp31 wrote:
    Nice shoes BTW... what make/model are they please?

    They're Gaerne Carbon G Chrono Speedplay road shoes, here's my review of them http://road.cc/content/review/89910-gaerne-carbon-g-chrono-speedplay-roa...

  • DfT urged to change road design rules now or risk strangling David Cameron's 'Cycling Revolution'1 year 13 weeks agodidds wrote:They can spend

    didds wrote:
    They can spend all they want on new infrastructures and enforcinf the existing rules... but until you can get into the minds of the great British unwashed that cycles are on a par with any other vehicle and that using a bicycle warrants as much care. consideration and rule following that we hope vehicle drivers display, then its a waste of money.

    The cretins that moan about cyclists not paying road tax and that the splodge of green paint harbouring all the road detritus HAS to be used will just see "wasted money" and yet more opportunities to moan at cyclists not using the provision.

    And if said provision mweans cyclists MUST use it rather than the perfectly adequate road... segregation is not an answer IMO.

    didds

    As I said earlier, it isn't an either-or situation. Build high-quality infrastructure and cyclists will use it - not because they have to, but because it's better than riding on the road. Make changes to driver training and enforcement to ensure road-users understand the responsibility of driving better, and ensure bikeability is taught in every school.

    It will take time and money, but with the right political will it can happen. Currently this is the most important missing factor, but for some reason I'm optimistic.

  • Buyer's guide to windproof cycling jackets1 year 13 weeks agoWhat about the Montane

    What about the Montane Featherlite Velo?
    http://www.montane.co.uk/range/men/windproof/featherlite-vlo-jacket
    It costs less than £50, I've had one for a few years now and it's unbelievably good. It works well as an outer layer with a mid layer and seems to shrug off even quite long, heavy rain, yet packs away into a stuff sac the size of an apple.
    It has no pockets, loads of reflective tape, breathes really well and just works.

  • Bianchi Infinito CV1 year 13 weeks agoGorgeous looking bike - would

    Gorgeous looking bike - would certainly be a pleasure to own one although I'd have to cheat on my other Italian, Mistress Wilier Wink

    Would be interesting to compare the comfort of the CV on 23mm tyres vs a 'regular' bike on 25mm tyres.

  • Welcome to Marlborough Country - but don't expect to park your bike on the High Street1 year 13 weeks agoAs an update, new cycle

    As an update, new cycle stands went in (though not all those promised):
    http://www.marlboroughnewsonline.co.uk/news/all-the-news/1921-new-propos...

    But they were soon taken out again for the annual MOP fair - heaven forbid anyone would want to cycle into the town for the fair.

    Several weeks later, their temporary removal is looking all the more permanent and the wheel bender racks are back Sad
    http://ow.ly/i/3wO0O
    http://ow.ly/i/3wO6C

  • Which UCI technical rules should be updated? We asked the experts1 year 13 weeks agoThe disc brakes argument is

    The disc brakes argument is an interesting one. Unless they can make the pads more quickly adjustable it is doubtful pro teams will want to make the switch as wheel changes will be time consuming and imprecise in terms of braking.

    I was talking to a DS of a continental team recently and he doubted whether they would work in their present form for pro racing for exactly that reason. He also suggested that the irony was they would not be successfully sold to masses of amateurs until they were seen to be used on mass by pros - so it's an interesting conundrum.

    The bike industry wants disc brakes to work on road bikes as it's the last major revenue niche. All the talk of lighter wheels without braking strips and improved braking is marginal waffle.

    I love the suggestion that lighter and lighter materials does not alter the safety of the bike. I don't own a carbon bike as the term 'catastrophic failure' isn't very reassuring. Carbon forks and other bits and pieces? Fine. But a whole bike whittled down to the weight of a feather is not as durable and as forgiving as a bike made of stronger materials. It just can't be and anyone who tells you otherwise forgets our human history of random icebergs and what cold weather does to booster rocket o-rings...

  • Just in: Genesis Equilibrium Disc1 year 13 weeks agoandyspaceman wrote:mrmo

    andyspaceman wrote:
    mrmo wrote:
    But is this a good steel frame?

    Hi Ten Gas pipe and 953 are both steel, the rides don't compare.

    Hi-ten gas pipe and 953 will ride pretty much identically if the tube profiles are the same.

    The difference with the hi-spec steels i that they can be drawn into thinner-walled tubes and still retain strength, allowing a lighter frame to be built.

    This is the point though, a 953 steel frame, also depending on which tubes are 953 will use tubes designed to make use of the material properties, a 4130 frame will have to work with the constraints of the material, likewise 631 etc etc.

    Then you have the common trick of main tubes are Chro-Mo whilst the remainder are Hi Ten.

    The resulting frames will ride differently steel is not steel. Take a old Peugeut Persius(?) 753 frame and compare it to genesis Volant 953, both are high end steel but there is very little in common with the designs performance etc.

  • Third of cyclists support mandatory hi-viz clothing claims survey1 year 13 weeks agoGoingRoundInCycles

    GoingRoundInCycles wrote:
    a.jumper wrote:
    Andrewwd wrote:
    I face plenty scorn on the roads from drivers, and now I find out I'm facing it from other cyclists because I'm wearing bright clothing! Brilliant.

    No, the scorn isn't for wearing bright clothing. It's for going beyond "bright" to what some regard as voluntarily wearing a Star of David on the jacket pocket.

    Wow there are some seriously nasty comments in this thread but this one takes the biscuit. Angry

    That comment's not entirely serious and not quite my view, but it seemed like Andrewwd was misunderstanding dislike of hi-vis as a dislike for all bright clothing, so I tried to make it a bit more memorable Wink

    GoingRoundInCycles wrote:
    Sorry to be such a quisling but I always wear a helmet, a combination of hi-viz yellow and reflective clothing whenever I am on my bike. Lights are a no-brainer. Does my choice of clothing negatively impact on you in some way? Maybe like bikeboy76 you think that a yellow-wearing 'twerp' like me is: ".... conforming to some standard that they think has been imposed on them" ?

    I wouldn't put it like that, but I feel that you only THINK you "KNOW" it makes a difference - unless you've got some secret study demonstrating its effectiveness that you're selfishly not publishing.

    People dressing bizarrely when riding bikes may negatively impact on me and everyone else who wears ordinary clothes to ride bikes as an ordinary part of daily life. I think it's selfish - dodgy drivers could get used to the funny-looking riders and stop looking for people walking and cycling in ordinary clothes, or animals that stray into the roads for that matter. (Ever seen a dayglo cat, rabbit, badger or deer?)

    We must normalise space for cycling before it is too late. Many towns and cities in the UK are still above the 10% biking of 1970s Copenhagen - if they can do it, so can we!

    But we already have frequent attempts to claim that people have shown "contributory negligence" when run over simply because they weren't wearing a hard hat that is not designed to protect in a car collision. Now we're seeing reports like a person walking being criticised for not wearing hi-vis - linked above: http://road.cc/content/news/75692-insurer-tries-cut-damages-pay-out-teen... - and a coroner in NZ criticising people for not wearing hi-vis when riding, even though the rider who died was wearing it! - http://road.cc/content/news/77369-coroner-cyclists-have-duty-other-road-... - which then led to
    the ministry considering making it mandatory http://road.cc/content/news/76314-nz-ministry-transport-considering-coro...

    I've ridden in NZ. It's really unpleasant in the cities. It feels like that is the bike-hating road we are heading down. WE MUST NOT GO GENTLE INTO THAT DARK NIGHT! Lights and reflectives on the bike: OK. Dressing up like a dayglo banana: not OK.

  • Trial of driverless pods on pavements of Milton Keynes heralds "science fiction future" (+ video)1 year 13 weeks agoEssentially the

    Essentially the commercialisation of our streets. Someone can make money out of this - there is no money to be made in building cycling infrastructure. Once it is built it needs to be maintained.

    The societal benefits of cycling are ignored because of the pressure from industry and business. UK measures success in share price and not happy people (unless they are bankers).

  • DfT urged to change road design rules now or risk strangling David Cameron's 'Cycling Revolution'1 year 13 weeks agoSo, are you a "glass 1/10th

    So, are you a "glass 1/10th full" (short term) or a "glass 9/10ths empty" (long-term) person?!

    Neither I'm a realist and the apparent ctc policy of right to the road is what has done damage to cycling in the uk.

  • THis is what we have to put up with1 year 13 weeks agoColin Peyresourde wrote: The

    Colin Peyresourde wrote:

    The only problem I have with cycle lanes is that they're not for going fast. Or at least the segregated bike lanes are not.

    http://aseasyasridingabike.wordpress.com/2013/02/26/no-you-are-not-held-...

  • Details released of opening two stages of next May's Women's Tour1 year 13 weeks agoFor more information on

    For more information on Cycling in Northamptonshire, please follow the Official Northamptonshire Highways' Cycle Northants Team @CycleNorthants. We look forward to hearing from you!

  • Third of cyclists support mandatory hi-viz clothing claims survey1 year 13 weeks agoTorino74 wrote:One last

    Torino74 wrote:
    One last thing; this is possibly the most bizarre thread I've ever seen. Not sure why everyone is getting so worked up about it.

    Because people like Goingroundincircles insist on delivering supposition, anecdotes and opinion as "fact".

  • THis is what we have to put up with1 year 13 weeks agoDave Atkinson wrote:egb

    Dave Atkinson wrote:
    egb wrote:
    Cycle lanes don't address the major problem of road safety, which is terrible driving and attitudes.

    they do if they're properly designed, protected and segregated, because the standard of driving, and attitudes of drivers, won't really matter.

    make the cycle lanes good enough and people won't want to ride on the road instead. the only reason they ( and I ) do is because the lanes are rubbish, because councils aren't required to build them to the standards expected of their european counterparts.

    The only problem I have with cycle lanes is that they're not for going fast. Or at least the segregated bike lanes are not.

    And once they are set up there is the entrenched notion that cyclists should not be on the road if there are good cycle lanes. I don't suppose you are saying that they should replace the bi-ways of our countryside, but more for the commuting areas of towns. Sadly for someone who cannot distinguish between vehicle excise tax and road tax they may have problems with that sort of thinking too.

  • Ride like a pro with Jaguar Ride Out events for chance to join Team Sky training camp1 year 13 weeks agoThis worked out quite well in

    This worked out quite well in the end... I won a trip to Sky's training camp in Majorca yesterday!

  • Which UCI technical rules should be updated? We asked the experts1 year 13 weeks agoInitialised wrote:How about

    Initialised wrote:
    How about imposing a 'level playing field' with a cost ceiling for any given bike instead of design rules?

    For example £3000 upper limit and a minimum of say 1000 of each part used must be available to the consumer at the quoted prices for a minimum of say three months after the event, long enough to stop manufacturers artificially cutting prices to meet a teams target, short enough for cost fluctuations not to hurt the manufacturer.

    1. I thought that teams already had to use readily available parts and no "one-offs".
    2. A £3K limit doesn't work when there are bikes out there that cost £10K. A 3£k limit would be very difficult considering groupsets such as mechanical RED and Dura Ace are £2-£2.5K, wheels are what another £1-2K and frames are another £3K+. Crickey, I have a £500 frame, £500 wheels, £800 gear system, £200 cranks, £160 brakes...
    3. What's stopping manufacturers selling to "customer" teams? Considering a team can have 40 riders, each with 5 bikes, thats 200 units. Get 5 teams (3 continental and 2 national) and that's your 1000 units.

  • UCI Management Committee agrees Anti-doping audit and independent commission into wrongdoing1 year 13 weeks agoHardly a drop in salary in

    Hardly a drop in salary in real terms, I can't see that he ever was on the same scale of remuneration at British Cycling.