• Chris Hoy hits out at “stupid” cyclists1 year 9 weeks agoRespect is given. Not earned.

    Respect is given. Not earned.

  • Chris Hoy hits out at “stupid” cyclists1 year 9 weeks agoThat's Chris Hoy off my

    That's Chris Hoy off my christmas card list.

  • NSW roads minister says cyclists should be licensed and banned from some roads - for their own safety1 year 9 weeks agoI do believe everyone making

    I do believe everyone making a public statement about cycling should first be required to commute to work for a month.

  • Chris Hoy hits out at “stupid” cyclists1 year 9 weeks agoget fucked chris mate. fuck

    get fucked chris mate. fuck right off.

  • dhb launch Goldline summer clothing range1 year 9 weeks agoI'm so glad it looks...

    I'm so glad it looks... normal. The more cycle clothing available that doesn't make you look like either a Power Ranger or a shrink-wrapped billboard, the better. I don't understand why so much cycle gear is so gratuitously horrible. People pay excessive amounts for Rapha clothing, and I'm convinced that the main reason (besides the seductive lifestyle branding), is that it's one of the few pieces of cycle clothing that just looks like... clothing, rather than a collection of bizarre space costumes.

  • Chris Hoy hits out at “stupid” cyclists1 year 9 weeks agoShould car drivers earn our

    Should car drivers earn our respect as well then? What a load of crap. Let's start policing everyone and telling people off. I want to go out and enjoy my ride, not play policeman... There will always be idiots who decide to break the law. It's not up to us to make sure that these people behave so that motorists respect the rest of us.

  • Chris Hoy hits out at “stupid” cyclists1 year 9 weeks agoQuote: recently announced

    Quote:

    recently announced plans to get into car racing.

    Hmmm.

  • A thoroughly good cove1 year 9 weeks agoSB76 wrote:Anyone on the road

    SB76 wrote:
    Anyone on the road needs to earn respect. If we all behaved like that, perhaps the roads would be less dangerous.

    No, that is nonsense.

    Everyone on the roads needs to be treated with respect, equal respect.

  • Video: Sussex Police use CCTV footage of motorist knocking 12-year-old girl off bike in safety campaign1 year 9 weeks agoKiwiMike wrote:oozaveared

    KiwiMike wrote:
    oozaveared wrote:

    And on the flip side how easy it is for people to be careless and not look carefully enough so making the point about doing everything you can to mitigate the chances that their mistake ends up with you getting hurt.

    Please quote the peer-reviewed sciency stuff showing the Hi-Viz reduces collisions. I'm sure a lot of people will want to see it. Particularly the Hi-Viz industry, who - strangely - don't cite any evidence their products improve safety. Rather like the helmet industry, come to think of it...

    But I digress. For further proof of the victim-blaming-wrapped-up-as-safety-message bent of this whole thing, look no further than the follow-up article, including comments from the driver himself: http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/11187568.Driver_who_knocked_down_girl_cyc...

    "It was my fault that I hit her but she was dressed in all grey on what was a rather grey day.

    "It may not have made a difference in this case, but I would urge cyclists to wear bright clothes, or high visibility items."

    Spot the two 'buts' in there? This person clearly believes they were not fully responsible. Sure, they have admitted liability - but I bet only because it was on tape.

    And I disagree with your comparison that this is akin to taking sensible anti-theft precautions. Theft is a calculated action, minimised by sensible precaution. Road collisions are more often than not the fault of one party, and no amount of precaution or clothing on the part of the other will save you - unless, as requested, you do have that Hi-Viz-works proof. The fact that the Police still bang on about it being an equal responsibility is corrosive. It's victim-blaming.

    No more no less.

    You first. Tell me where I say you have to wear high viz clothing. Or was that a Blue Peter response you prepared earlier.

    Queensland Uni have done some work but that is dusk and low light based.

    TRL have also done some work on it. The conclusion is that it is not hi viz per se but the level of contrast against a background that aids visibility such that white and/or black may work very well in certain circumstances. Hi viz is Hi viz because it uses colours that are likely to contrast with most backgrounds.

    Increasing your visibility not necessaily by Hi viz clothing is a good idea. I use lights even in the day. I even do that when I am driving. Positioning is also a means of increasing your visibility. Likewise having a sensible idea of what drivers can see and what they are focusing on at the time is helpful. Cycling makes me a better driver and driving makes me a better cyclist.

    Don't be so obessesed with one or the other. In my view on an open road wearing clothes using lights that aid your visibility from a distance is not a matter of being seen or not being seen. It's more a matter of being seen and being "noticed" a little bit earlier. You may want to explore the concept of seeing without noticing. The brain is hierachical. We see huge amounts. We notice much less.

    In advanced driving we have a mantra that has the acronym TTR. Time To React. In most cases we mean by providing that time for yourself, but you should also provide it for others. If you help yourself to be noticed a bit earlier a driver may well start thinking about passing you a bit earlier. They may make a better job of it. Some won't bother but some may. And people with poor vision shouldn't be driving but they are. Likewise people with poor reactions. Of course they'll see you without the hi viz. But they may notice you earlier. TTR aids road safety al round.

    I have been riding properly since my early teens joining a club in 1973. I've been a driver since I was 17 in 1979. I have driven professionally all over the world. I don't wear a helmet but I do use day time lights and I think about what I wear.

    BTW "Victim blaming" is such a crass phrase. It's philosophically dishonest. It's based on a false dichotomy. see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_dilemma

    The victim of a collision is not automatically absolved of blame just because some people think the term "Victim blaming" is a form of check mate in an argument. It's a logical fallacy. Saves you having to think too much is all and tidies everything into a lazy binary choice.

    Why don't you stop using it and deal with the more complex realities of these matters.

  • Met says thieves target mass-market commuting bikes - because they are easier to sell1 year 9 weeks agoallez neg wrote:No no no no.

    allez neg wrote:
    No no no no. No.

    Victim blaming surely - there should be the infrastructure in place and the societal change necessary to eradicate theft before us bike owners should be expected to use locks.

    This is the road.cc forum after all.

    Just out of interest, do you know what the theft rate of "properly secured" bicycles is?

    For myself, I ride around with a 10Kg chain. I triple lock the bicycle with it and also attach claymores. To round off the job, and protect myself reasonably, as anyone that cares about their bicycle would, I carry a 30Kg lead-acid battery which can deliver a stunning jolt to whoever touches the bicycle. After all, it pays to take precautions doesn't it?

    Be safe out there!

    Oh... nearly forgot... I also wear a special hat and clothing to deter the bike thieves.

  • NSW roads minister says cyclists should be licensed and banned from some roads - for their own safety1 year 9 weeks agoQuote:During March, six

    Quote:
    During March, six cyclists out on a club run on Southern Cross Drive suffered serious injuries when the group they were riding with was hit by a car.

    and no charges yet against the driver Worried

    (and that should read very serious injuries)

    Aussie driver like it simple - that's my lane and the speed limit is my speed

    oh and I've already got a license Smile - not checked what the biggest I can drive in Aus is but I've got 2tonne SUV as well as my 7kg bike

  • New Forest presents draft charter for cycling events1 year 9 weeks agoAl__S wrote:CarlosFerreiro

    Al__S wrote:
    CarlosFerreiro wrote:
    If you try to follow the highway code guidance on singling out AND the government guidance on taking primary, then it'd seem to lead inevitably to riders in this situation singling out to primary position? Thinking

    Indeed. I take the HC guidance on singling out to refer to single-lane narrow roads, where you need to be single to allow vehicles coming the other way to pass.

    As there's no actual definition of what a narrow road is in the HC, I reckon "too narrow for a centre line" is a sensible cut off.


    That'd be one idea to base it on. Another idea would seem to be that maybe "narrow" might be where a car cannot overtake a bike, giving the appropriate DoT dynamic envelopes, without crossing the centre-line. That's a LOT of roads.
    But not sure what the specifics are actually intended to be.

  • NSW roads minister says cyclists should be licensed and banned from some roads - for their own safety1 year 9 weeks agoOn the other hand, if every

    On the other hand, if every school boy and girl was to pass a bike driving test, they would be more aware about bike safety in traffic, also later as a car driver.

    Over here in Switzerland I had a cop at primary school teaching us the rules, taking us practicing several times and testing our skills driving busy roads (I got a gold medal, the only ever though…).

  • Video: Cycling commuters caught unaware in Tesco Mobile ad1 year 9 weeks agoGo through Lewisham on my

    Go through Lewisham on my commute to & from work, Darn! Would have loved it!!!! Great ad Applause

  • Video: Sussex Police use CCTV footage of motorist knocking 12-year-old girl off bike in safety campaign1 year 9 weeks agooozaveared wrote: Let's try

    oozaveared wrote:

    Let's try again.

    Who was reported for the crime?
    Who was charged?
    Who was prosecuted?
    Who was convicted?
    Who was fined?
    Who had 3 points added to their licence?
    Whose insurance premium will go up next year and for the next 5 years?
    Who had to pay costs?
    Who had to pay the victim surcharge?

    Who gets to go back on the road?
    Who is just one of a significant proportion of road users who will make identical mistakes?
    How many road users came away with the impression that cyclists should wear hi-viz?
    Who will be injured in similar collisions?
    Who will be killed in similar collisions?
    How many more motorized vehicles will be on the road in the future?
    How will that affect the number of such incidents?
    Why are the penalties in law so low for such serious incidents?
    Will the victim feel comfortable on the road in the future?

    oozaveared wrote:

    And on the flip side how easy it is for people to be careless and not look carefully enough so making the point about doing everything you can to mitigate the chances that their mistake ends up with you getting hurt.

    There is probably very little you can do to improve your safety in similar circumstances: car drivers run into huge, brightly coloured obvious things all the time.

    And I think that's at least part of where the diverging opinions on this come from, there's a desire to believe that we have significant control over events. It helps to think that the victim (which could be me) was not doing something (which I do) and therefore that despite the awful situation it probably won't happen to me.

    Inevitably these accidents will happen due to the over use of motorized vehicles. Compounding the injury to the victim with insult is just crass.

  • A thoroughly good cove1 year 9 weeks agoAnyone on the road needs to

    Anyone on the road needs to earn respect. If we all behaved like that, perhaps the roads would be less dangerous.
    Remember, it's a comment aimed at the small amount of cyclists who are thoughtless. Same could be said of drivers too

  • New Forest presents draft charter for cycling events1 year 9 weeks agoQuote:there's nothing in the

    Quote:
    there's nothing in the charter they're not already doing.
    ....exactly that's the whole of idea of charters and self regulation

    as to the pic this comment is spot on

    "It's a two-lane road. It will never, ever be safe to pass even single-file cyclists without crossing the centreline. Therefore the driver should use the entire opposite lane. Therefore the cyclists are perfectly correct. What they should NOT do is go single file, encouraging a close pass in the face of oncoming traffic.
    posted by KiwiMike"

  • New Forest presents draft charter for cycling events1 year 9 weeks agoCarlosFerreiro wrote:If you

    CarlosFerreiro wrote:
    If you try to follow the highway code guidance on singling out AND the government guidance on taking primary, then it'd seem to lead inevitably to riders in this situation singling out to primary position? Thinking

    Indeed. I take the HC guidance on singling out to refer to single-lane narrow roads, where you need to be single to allow vehicles coming the other way to pass.

    As there's no actual definition of what a narrow road is in the HC, I reckon "too narrow for a centre line" is a sensible cut off.

  • Trek launch Domane 6.9 Disc (there's a Domane 4.0 Disc too)1 year 9 weeks agoZip ties are a big NO NO. On

    Zip ties are a big NO NO. On a £6,000 bike... Come on. It reminds me when Specialized use to slap on the Di2 battery with zip ties from the water bottle mount when that first launched. Stop rushing things to market and do them properly.

  • A thoroughly good cove1 year 9 weeks agoTo quote Flight of The

    To quote Flight of The Conchords, 'this is where we break it down':

    Quote:
    When we talk later in the stalls of the velodrome, though, it emerges there is at least one thing that moves him to anger. Namely, cyclists who ignore the rules of the road. “When I’m out on a bike and I see someone doing something stupid I will absolutely have a word with them at the next set of lights,” he says.

    Have a word with them? Cool, not going to argue with you on that one, but has Hoy just come out with this, unprompted, after some pondering? Hardly likely. Theo Merz, for whatever reason, has presumably needled his interviewee to lead him to that answer, Hoy's use of 'absolutely' gives this away for me.

    Also, I really hope by 'stalls' he is just trying to incongruously use the language of theatre and isn't mithering Sir Chris whilst he is in the bogs. Though, it would not surprise me.

    Quote:
    The last time the he had a word with an errant rider was a couple of weeks ago in Edinburgh, where the athlete was born and much of his family still live. “There was a guy who was riding like an idiot, jumping lights, cutting up the pavement

    Anti-social cyclists or anti-social clowns on bikes, whichever way you prefer the dog to be washed, exist. And, yes, they are bad bellwhiffs, but they aren't of such great numbers and posing such a great danger that they warrant anywhere near the column inches and hysteria that they provoke, but that's the smoke and mirrors we're dealing with. However, I don't see that *all* pavement cycling or that *all* red light jumping is wrong, but that debate get's covered over and over and nobody comes out any smarter.

    Quote:
    and I just said: ‘You’re not helping matters here.

    Too right you are Chris, well done for letting him know he was in the wrong, as a very respected ambassador for cycling and sport it is well within his remit to have a word. And let's be honest, he's a pretty big sausage so most people are probably going to listen when he has a word.

    Quote:
    If you want respect you have to earn it.’”

    That's the unnecessary bit. Why do cyclists have to earn respect? What logic is there in suddenly gaining more respect just because you have locked your bike up and started walking down the road? Why does sitting in a car suddenly mean that you deserve more respect that someone on a bike? We all have a responsibility to not act like whoppers, but deciding that certain humans don't deserve respect purely based on the fact they've chose to pedal a bicycle? It's nonsense, utter nonsense.

  • NSW roads minister says cyclists should be licensed and banned from some roads - for their own safety1 year 9 weeks agohe's doing a Boris...

    he's doing a Boris... throwing a dead cat onto the table to detract from the dangerous state of his roads and the deadly driving of his motorists...

  • New Forest presents draft charter for cycling events1 year 9 weeks ago4.4 Report immediately to

    4.4 Report immediately to the Police any instances of sign removal or tampering, obstacles or hazards placed on roads, or offences committed by other road users including other participants.

    yeah like they're going to be really bothered about investigating sign removal or tampering. And I wonder how far they got investigating the trailer load of mud dump on the route of last years autumn's event.

    Let's face it the main purpose of the document and main anti cycling groups in the area is to try to shut down UK Cycling Events activities in the area because the traditional local "power" wielders aren't getting anything out of them and don't have any control over the public highways and are angry that "outsiders" can't be controlled.

    As is reported the UKCE event code of conduct and rules already included all of the points in the charter.

    By the way I live on the outskirts of the New Forest and ride within the boundaries regularly in case anyone's wondering.

  • A thoroughly good cove1 year 9 weeks ago'They don't set back the

    'They don't set back the cause of cycling'

    They certainly do.

  • Cambridge Tour de France road closures a "nightmare" says councillor1 year 9 weeks ago'its a bit like a seaside

    'its a bit like a seaside tourist attraction town.'

    Nothing of the sort. You live near a beach or a football ground, you expect tourists/ pissed-up neanderthals on a regular basis.
    You live in/near Cambridge, you expect students cycling like prats, and expensive train journeys to London, but not road closures for sporting events. Sure, people who don't want to watch the event can make other plans, and yes, it's their 'fault' if they don't. But they still have an absolute right to be pissed off about it.

  • NSW roads minister says cyclists should be licensed and banned from some roads - for their own safety1 year 9 weeks ago".... part of it involves

    ".... part of it involves Southern Cross Drive and then on down to Wollongong. I understand how important this is for cyclists, but there have been a couple of accidents there"

    Strikes me (having grown up and ridden there; and now being an occasional visitor with a bicycle) that the problem is that when they built the Sthn Cross Drive/M1/M5 interface, particularly the bit at the western end of the runway tunnel, they simply ignored bicycles. As an aside, the runway tunnel itself if (I find) terrifying on a bike. If I am riding south I will skirt around the northern edge of the airport through Tempe to avoid it.

    Australian cars are generally bigger (and older) than your average UK car and because there's usually less traffic they are frequently travelling faster than vehicles in the UK. To compound matters, your average Australian driver tries to make up for their lack of skill (hard to believe, but the average quality of driving in Australia is considerably below that in the UK) with aggression. I find riding my bike in and around London considerably less stressful than Sydney.