• How a carbon wheel is made + video1 year 11 weeks agoThat really is a much more

    That really is a much more labor intensive build than I would have assumed. No wonder carbon rims cost so much!!!

  • Vulpine Cotton Rain jacket1 year 11 weeks agoI was excited to take

    I was excited to take delivery of mine today and I must say it is BEAUTIFULLY made. The price seems steep until you see the quality; this jacket isn't just sewn, it is tailored. For example, all the internal seams are hemmed.

    It's difficult to see when ordering online but the pockets are excellently placed and it was a nice surprise to see they are lined with a lovely soft fleece. It makes for a very comfortable, as well as smart, town jacket.

    A quick spin in town proved it works very nicely on the bike. Breathability is unsurprisingly much improved over Goretex, and similar, jackets.

    My only gripe would be the cuffs. Again hard to see when ordering online. They turn out to be a simple outer cuff (lined) with an internal doubled over fleece inner cuff. The problem I have with this is, having skinny wrists, the fleece cuffs don't close on me so in this morning's chilly air there was a cold draught blowing up the sleeves. Then when I was fully warmed up, in traffic with less airflow, day warmed up a bit, I found the doubled over fleece was very warm and I would like to have been able to open it.

    They are also a bit bulky for such a minimalist tailored garment. If you count the outer fabric, the lining and the fleece cuff being doubled, there are four layers of fabric which is a bit at odds with the rest of the jacket's philosophy.

    A simple Velcro (or trademark magnetic stud) flap would be more practical: draught-proof for cold mornings and openable for a bit of cooling later on.

    However it's a minor gripe and so far I've very pleased Smile

  • Canadian doctors call for mandatory cycle helmets for all 'to reduce head injury'1 year 11 weeks agoThis video totally makes the

    This video totally makes the point that many are trying to make: it's not about helmets, it's about making a road culture that promotes, expects, and above all respects people on bicycles. A helmet law would not help this cultural shift at all, and in my opinion would actually make it worse.

    Like many others here I frequently choose to wear a helmet, but usually don't when I'm 'utility cycling' (normal clothes, short journeys of a few miles). As a society it is this kind of cycling that needs to increase. The lycra and strava fuelled obsessives of this site are not relevant, it's your neighbours, your parents and grandparents, and your colleagues at work who don't cycle in the UK because there is such a car-bias that would be helped by a Danish/Dutch cycling attitude and structure. I've cycled in both countries, and seen that rate of helmet use is almost non-existent in both, and the odd person in HiViz is looked upon as though they're an alien. Yet they seem happy and healthy and the streets aren't littered with bodies.

    The solution, is to make it easier to bike to the shops, station, work, school etc, helmets are at best a distraction from this.

  • Castelli Nanoflex Leg Warmers1 year 11 weeks agooh er! just ironed my arm

    oh er! just ironed my arm warmers, now for some rain.

    as an extra bit of advice take them off to iron them though, i now have barely any arm hair left now.

  • Infinity Seat claims to offer improved comfort over a regular saddle1 year 11 weeks agoIt's only 205 grams. That'd

    It's only 205 grams. That'd be a lot less with titanium rails.

  • Buyer’s guide to the best winter bib tights and trousers for cycling1 year 11 weeks agoNorthernbike wrote:That all

    Northernbike wrote:
    That all over lyrca bodysuit is going a bit superhero for me. It's probably good for chaining yourself to Buckingham Palace in but not great if you want to go out for a ride and don't have a phone box to dash into nearby, or if you do go out but need a wee half way round.

    If you read the review (http://road.cc/content/review/77803-castelli-sanremo-thermosuit) you'll know it's as easy to pee in the Thermosuit as in regular bib tights. In fact I reckon it's easier than most bib tights, primarily because there are no bib straps

  • Jon Snow: cyclists ‘behave extremely badly’ and I don’t know a single one who hasn’t jumped a red light1 year 11 weeks agoColin Peyresourde

    Colin Peyresourde wrote:
    downfader wrote:

    "Basically as human beings we are born hypocrites" is the most nonsensical nonsense I've seen written on here. It shows you have little to no understanding of psychological development and just wanted to say something grand and bold to make the comment look clever.

    Sounds exactly what you are trying to do. Especially with your last comment about Manchester ("If Manchester has a problem - fight for better"). So you've rather proved my point (or at least Jon Snow's/Jesus's point, which you again wilfully ignore) by being a hypocrite yourself. No one is perfect and we are all likely to have transgressed a law here and a law there. At least Snow is in a position to try and change things in Manchester and elsewhere.

    And who ever said anything about a hive mind? You seem to fail to understand human psychology if you don't understand how human beings are naturally reductive about the world around them in order to understand it - stereotyping is effectively that. I'm not accepting guilt for anyone, but if you want to change the attitudes of 'non-cyclists' (to choose a reductive term, which also lumps people whom don't need their mind changing) I take personal responsibility for my actions to try to show that we are not all RLJ, that we can share the road safely and legally.

    "And who ever said anything about a hive mind?" you did. You assumed we all behave the same.

    If you want to call me a hypocrite, fine. If you'd rather fight for better standards and legal protection then that would be much more effective than trolling like some brainwashed 10-cent'er.

    Remember - what you and others see may not be the full picture. Look wider, read the studies, collect effective and unbiased evidence yourself, if you do not then you're also part of the problem and substantiating the preconceptions of noncyclists who look to confirm their own prejudices.

  • Sportful Bodyfit Pro Wind Vest1 year 11 weeks agoI love my bike wrote:A photo

    I love my bike wrote:
    A photo of somebody wearing it on a bike/in a riding position would be useful.

    How would it be useful to you?

  • Jon Snow: cyclists ‘behave extremely badly’ and I don’t know a single one who hasn’t jumped a red light1 year 11 weeks agohampstead_bandit

    hampstead_bandit wrote:
    @crazy-legs

    London has a great ANPR system which is linked into mobile Police patrol vehicles and also the 1000's of CCTV cameras on the streets; many of which sit conveniently on top of masts at traffic junctions (you can spot them if look above the traffic lights at many junctions).

    If you speak to the Police (I used to work for them, and still have contacts within the Police both Met and BTP ) they catch a surprising amount by 'fishing' through the ANPR system, including offenders with outstanding warrants.

    the problem with lawless cyclists?

    motorized vehicles have V.I.N. (numberplates to the layman).

    cyclists do not have any such identification, except for the Boris bikes which carry a frame I.D. on their chassis and vehicle number on the plastic fairings.

    good luck tracking down a private bicycle with no V.I.N. Sad

    "Great ANPR"?

    So why is London one of the highest rates for uninsured drivers in the UK?
    Why aren't these drivers held more rigorously to account for speeding, illegal parking and running red lights?

    Cyclists are held to account via FPNs in London. There are several operations each year now where hundreds are stopped by the Police, most are given FPN fines, but some do end up in court.

    Don't judge the rest of the country by London. And even in London (I have visited many times) the majority still follow the law.

  • First look: Scapin and Olympia 2014 road bikes1 year 11 weeks agoLooks a bit big to be for

    Looks a bit big to be for that Robert Smith Wink

  • Ultegra STI Levers and SRAM Force Mechs1 year 11 weeks agoglynr36 wrote:Different pull

    glynr36 wrote:
    Different pull rations on the rear, fronts are compatible though.
    Okay. Thanks for the info.

  • Jon Snow: cyclists ‘behave extremely badly’ and I don’t know a single one who hasn’t jumped a red light1 year 11 weeks agohampstead_bandit

    hampstead_bandit wrote:
    @crazy-legs

    motorized vehicles have V.I.N. (numberplates to the layman).

    cyclists do not have any such identification, except for the Boris bikes which carry a frame I.D. on their chassis and vehicle number on the plastic fairings.

    good luck tracking down a private bicycle with no V.I.N. Sad

    You need to check your facts with your Police mates

    The VIN is the Vehicle Identification Number which is located on the top of the dashboard scuttle at the base of the windscreen, and in various other locations around a motor vehicle, you'd be hard pressed to get that with ANPR. Whilst the VRN, (see below) may change the VIN remains constant. Most bicycles have an equivalent which is the Serial Number normally to be found on the bottom bracket.

    What you mean is the VRN, Vehicle Registration Number, which is displayed on the 'number plate'. Bicycles don't have an equivalent because the VRN is used to register the vehicle for vehicle excise duty which is not payable for bicycles.

  • Sportful Bodyfit Pro Wind Vest1 year 11 weeks agoA photo of somebody wearing

    A photo of somebody wearing it on a bike/in a riding position would be useful.

  • John Lamont MSP calls for Borders disused rail lines to be made into bike paths1 year 11 weeks agoThis might be a bit radical,

    This might be a bit radical, but you could try turning those disused railway lines into working railways, which would take a lot of heavy traffic off the roads. They could also provide easy access to the borders from the towns and cities of the central belt for people to take their bikes out for day trips.

    Also with less heavy traffic it would also be possible to free space for safe cycle routes along the major road routes into and cross the Borders, which follow the course of least resistance. Currently, cyclists are pushed off to the minor roads, which often have far stepper inclines and are not always suitable family cycling (or long distance commuting).

  • Tour of Flanders1 year 11 weeks agoLeffe!

    Leffe!

  • Ultegra STI Levers and SRAM Force Mechs1 year 11 weeks agoDifferent pull rations on the

    Different pull rations on the rear, fronts are compatible though.

  • Does the way you ride say what sort of employee you'd be? Lucy Kellaway thinks it might.1 year 11 weeks ago...sigh....really? perhaps

    ...sigh....really? perhaps this site is not meant for you...

  • Sportful Pista LS Jersey Full Zip1 year 11 weeks agoand here's what it looks like

    and here's what it looks like on someone who chose the right size Wink

  • John Lamont MSP calls for Borders disused rail lines to be made into bike paths1 year 11 weeks agoOr you could sort out the

    Or you could sort out the motorist problem, oh but it's easier to just try and ignore the problem it seems.

  • Jon Snow: cyclists ‘behave extremely badly’ and I don’t know a single one who hasn’t jumped a red light1 year 11 weeks ago@crazy-legs London has a

    @crazy-legs

    London has a great ANPR system which is linked into mobile Police patrol vehicles and also the 1000's of CCTV cameras on the streets; many of which sit conveniently on top of masts at traffic junctions (you can spot them if look above the traffic lights at many junctions).

    If you speak to the Police (I used to work for them, and still have contacts within the Police both Met and BTP ) they catch a surprising amount by 'fishing' through the ANPR system, including offenders with outstanding warrants.

    the problem with lawless cyclists?

    motorized vehicles have V.I.N. (numberplates to the layman).

    cyclists do not have any such identification, except for the Boris bikes which carry a frame I.D. on their chassis and vehicle number on the plastic fairings.

    good luck tracking down a private bicycle with no V.I.N. Sad

  • Does the way you ride say what sort of employee you'd be? Lucy Kellaway thinks it might.1 year 11 weeks agoAnd the rubbish articles

    And the rubbish articles continue it seems.

  • Jon Snow: cyclists ‘behave extremely badly’ and I don’t know a single one who hasn’t jumped a red light1 year 11 weeks agoThere was a comment a while

    There was a comment a while ago on a related story from a Dutch traffic engineer who'd said (in response to a moan about British cyclists jumping lights) "then your infrastructure is wrong".

    Basically implying that if you put in proper cycle-specific infrastructure (as opposed to the half hearted bollocks we get foisted on us at the moment) then cyclist won't feel the need to jump lights.

    Now I admit that a lot of cyclists RLJ-ing are doing so out of pure selfishness and I acknowledge that there are differing degrees of RLJ from ploughing through regardless, scattering pedestrians in your wake to a cautious-edge-forward-and-go-if-clear. But there are also a number of cyclists who RLJ because it's safer (for them) and more convenient to other road users (ie getting out of the way of the F1 starting grid behind them). I put myself into the latter category.

    But the point still remains that I shouldn't be *forced* into that, either by the bad design and layout of the road or because of the inconsiderate drivers behind who are going to try and drive through me as they race away from the lights.

    And in answer to hampstead_bandit's trolling above...

    Quote:
    if anyone in authority ever bothered to do a proper clamp-down on cyclists ignoring road traffic safety, they'd net a huge amount in fixed penalty notices just in a single day, let alone a week.

    Do that with drivers. You'd solve the National Debt inside of a week.

  • Canadian doctors call for mandatory cycle helmets for all 'to reduce head injury'1 year 11 weeks agoJeevesBath wrote: Have you

    JeevesBath wrote:

    Have you considered that the statistics in the study you reference don't include a large number of cyclists who DIDN'T have head injuries, because they were wearing a helmet when they had their accident? It would seem that most data is based on information from A&E departments etc, so it only includes those cases where a head injury occured. Hence, arguments in favour of helmets tend to be more anecdotal, as in "I fell off my bike last week and cracked my helmet, but my head was fine".

    Most developed countries (including GB) publish annual figures for the amount of car, lorry, bicycle etc. miles ridden in the year. These have various inaccuracies no doubt, but as long as the method of collecting remains the same the figures will certainly capture trends.
    Figures for cyclist head injuries treated in hospital are generally collected too. When helmets are made mandatory in a country the proportion of cyclists wearing them goes up suddenly, often to above 90% from 30 or 40%.
    If the number of cyclists treated goes down (or up) but the number of miles or kilometres ridden remains the same when the rate of helmet wearing doubles or trebles we can deduce that helmets may have saved injuries and lives (or cost them).
    In Oz, NZ and other mandatory helmet states the figures show no reduction in rates of injuries or deaths to cyclists. The number of casualties declined in proportion to the decline in miles cycled. This failure of helmets to reduce casualty rates has happened in all states where foam hats are mandatory. In states where helmets are not obligatory the figures seem to show the same, though because the increase in wearing is not so sudden it is more difficult to detect any effect or lack of effect.
    As a control we can look at say pedestrian casualty rates and see whether they have moved in the same way as cyclists', in order to allow for other changes in the road environment.
    The anecdotal evidence you mention is not very useful, but is often used by those in favour of compulsory helmets.

    There is a large amount of information and discussion at

    http://www.cyclehelmets.org/

  • Giro Air Attack helmet1 year 11 weeks agoWas interesting watching the

    Was interesting watching the track worlds in Manchester this weekend. Did any of you notice how many riders were using this helmet? Even the riders and teams who were sponsored by other brands chose to wear it in competition. I don't have one, and have never ridden in one, but seeing athletes choose the Air Attack over their sponsors helmet has to say something for its performance.

  • Does the way you ride say what sort of employee you'd be? Lucy Kellaway thinks it might.1 year 11 weeks agoThe man in the black coat

    The man in the black coat heading into the bank's carpark was as likely to be the Latvian odd job man as some rich banker. More likely in fact.

    It really doesn't do to apply stereotypes based on dress. Hang around a Ferrari garage to find that one out.