• Which is the best Jacques Anquetil book?1 year 22 weeks agoArmstrong's books are still

    Armstrong's books are still relevant - you might want to read the sections carefully where he became obsessed with the science behind his blood values in hopital - did he learn something here that allowed him to take doping to a whole new level post-cancer? Just a thought. He could do himself a big favour though, and that would be to confess to the truth and then re-write his story. I for one would buy that book!

  • 'Stupid twats' website issues apology after backlash - we look at the company behind it1 year 22 weeks agocomm88 wrote:It raised

    comm88 wrote:
    It raised awareness and provoked debate. Job done.

    I'm not sure it provoked a debate on road safety, more a debate about their intentions and how, if anything, they probably made matters worse.

    comm88 wrote:

    It wasn't trying to level any blame at all at anyone who has unfortunately been involved in a sadly serious cycling accident. God knows, we all come close, almost every time we ride on the roads.

    It simply says: If you ride like a pr*ck you will get punctured - so, wise up and stay safe ... for everyone's benefit.

    The "attack" on motorists' awareness is an entirely different campaign with a different objective and requires totally different creative treatment. This campaign didn't set out to educate drivers. It was aimed squarely at assholes on cycles who flout the law, behave insensibly and ride without respect for other road users ... while expecting, as they always do, that "everyone else" will take care of them.

    Where does the ad say that if you get killed it's your own stupid fault?

    Read it - it doesn't. It's a cause and effect statement. Do any of this and this is what is most likely to happen. And who can doubt it?

    So where exactly is the issue that "everyone is outraged by" and banging on about?????

    One of their limericks was:
    "There once was a cyclist named Keith,
    he road a fixie, lived out East,
    a car smashed his head,
    when he went through a red,
    now he's down in the ground deceased"

    In my book this is saying if you run red lights you will die. My point was that there are people who run red lights and ride on the pavement, while I don't think they should, they're not the ones causing the majority of cyclists' deaths so for the company to try and link them together in this manner is very misleading and can give motorists the fuel they need for their apparent anger at cyclists.

    comm88 wrote:

    Would that people were even mildly vociferous in the very same way about actually getting something positive done to make our roads safer!!!!!

    And it's not only drivers who have to do that. Cyclists must sharpen their act too and that includes the august bodies that "represent" us.

    All these words ... and nothing ever changes.


    I do agree that something should be done and less said, but as I said, maybe we should start with the cause of most accidents and work our way to the lesser causes?

  • Two week Welsh Police campaign sees 1,000 drivers fined for using phone at wheel1 year 22 weeks ago@mills1983 Ahem. I'm blaming

    @mills1983 Ahem. I'm blaming that building society for ticking that notion in my head...

  • Two week Welsh Police campaign sees 1,000 drivers fined for using phone at wheel1 year 22 weeks agoKiwiMike

    KiwiMike wrote:
    matthewuniverse wrote:
    "I can't see a noticeable difference in talking on my Bluetooth hands free to my wife or talking to her if she was in the car"

    What you can see is irrelevant; studies show it is little different from a handset.

    I work in the mobile industry, and pay a fair bit of attention to this sort of thing. What the research shows is that it's not a dexterity issue (or one-armed people wouldn't be allowed to drive). And many cars these days are autos anyway. What it is is as others have said, a cognitive load issue. You can't visualise/process a conversation and road hazards at the same time. Being hands-free makes no difference, and here's why: people in the car with you you can choose to ignore for a few seconds, and they naturally fall quiet as they can see you are doing something tricky like at a junction, changing lanes etc. they generally help to look as well, it's instinctive adult also-a-driver-too behaviour. If they are on the other end of a phone they cannot see what you are having to deal with, and just blather on, while you feel obliged to pay attention. That's the major difference.


    I've read some of those articles showing your "major difference" but as far as I can see there is no actual evidence to back this up, there is no study for example that shows that people are less likely to crash when talking to passengers in their car than on hands free in the same conditions, the only study I found on it was the one by Michigan University which concluded that they probably had the same effect. The cognitive load theory is backed up by playing a voice recording of someone talking to them (in one of the studies on the Guardian website last year) but it just states that this has a negative effect on driving which I'll accept as a fact. It does then try to differentiate hands free talking from talking to passengers by giving what seem like the researchers opinion, stating the same thing stuff as you but without any actual evidence to back it up. As I stated earlier, I could also make an argument for it actually being the other way round, but (as I also stated) it's just my opinion.

    I think that what Edgeley says is true, it's no illegal and would be very hard to enforce so we should just be glad they're pro-actively trying to stop people breaking the law and helping make the roads a little safer!

  • Just in: Enigma Effusion1 year 22 weeks agoBeautiful bike (love enigma's

    Beautiful bike (love enigma's stuff), just spoilt for me with the non-smoothed welding - would annoy me that - sorry!

  • Two week Welsh Police campaign sees 1,000 drivers fined for using phone at wheel1 year 22 weeks agomatthewuniverse wrote:"I

    matthewuniverse wrote:
    "I can't see a noticeable difference in talking on my Bluetooth hands free to my wife or talking to her if she was in the car"

    What you can see is irrelevant; studies show it is little different from a handset.

    But anyway, talking on the phone is not the same as talking to someone who is present. Just off the top of my head;

    They are not in the same place, they do not see or understand the same environment that you do, cannot recognise any potential hazards or moments requiring your extreme concentration; they do not have the benefit of your body language to assess or be alerted to a situation arising.
    Conversing with somebody who is not present partly takes your mind away from the immediate situation.

    Firstly, what I can see is very relevant as it's my choice at the moment whether to use the hands free or not.

    Secondly the studies you refer to only show the comparison between talking on a phone or using hands free, the sentence of mine that you quoted is clearly comparing talking on hands free to talking to another person in the car.

    So, I've reviewed your differences and agree that those are true but have thought up some more:
    If you are a cab driver or a parent with passengers in the back, they may not recognise any potential road hazards and/or may not inform you of them.
    If you are aware of their body language, it implies that you are paying visual attention to them and not the road, especially if they are in the back of the car.
    There is nothing but you in the car to take your eyes off the road, no one changing radio stations/cds, moving around in the back etc.

    In those situations, being on hands free would be safer than talking to the passenger in my opinion.

  • Just In – Hope V-Twin1 year 22 weeks agoSo people who frown upon

    So people who frown upon cable disc brakes buy converters that use cables to operate their hydraulic brakes... Brilliant Laughing

    P.S. Re: "... cables sensitive to water and grit contamination, non-centreing leading to disc rub, heavy..."

    Quality full length cables will last over a season of everyday cycling. Once the cable is "stretched" you won't need to touch it.
    BB7s and many other brakes WILL NOT rub once they are adjusted correctly as only one pad moves. You only need a single click on each adjustment knob every few weeks or months to compensate for the pad wear. That's the whole "adjustment" that BB7s require.

    You'll find that hydraulic brakes with their very narrow gaps and temperamental o-rings will rub more often and more unpredictably and once the piston(s) get sticky you have a problem.

  • Just in: Enigma Effusion1 year 22 weeks agoIf I was splashing out on

    If I was splashing out on titanium I'd like simple round tubing.

  • Just in: Enigma Effusion1 year 22 weeks agohmmm like enigma bikes but im

    hmmm like enigma bikes but im not a fan of the half carbon/titaniumon this example.

    however the Seven bike is beyond beautiful

  • Bristol 'crossgate: Council now working with CX organisers1 year 22 weeks agoReminds me of when I was

    Reminds me of when I was careering down an MTB trail in Afan Forest only to find a group of purple cagoule-wearing ramblers exercising their 'right to roam' back up it.

    I was also assured, as I got to my feet, that I would have been sued if I had hit them.

  • Survey: 1 in 3 regular cyclists in UK have been knocked off their bike1 year 22 weeks agoLast time I was knocked off

    Last time I was knocked off my bike a motor bike buzzed me - and his pannier hit my rear wheel. One very buckled sprint. New rim required. Twat.

  • Bristol 'crossgate: Council now working with CX organisers1 year 22 weeks agonowasps wrote:Road CC and

    nowasps wrote:
    Road CC and various other pro-cycling websites and pressure groups are very quick to stand up for the sport when the anti-cycling brigade appear on the horizon, and generally speaking, climb-downs and apologies soon follow... but why does it happen? And so regularly? Thinking

    Lack of understanding.
    NIMBY-ism
    Perceptions
    Response to complaints from "Angry of ..."

    I've helped organise/marshal many CX events over the years and one in particular stands out for the sheer unwillingness of the locals to compromise. Again, council-owned parkland, we're marking out the course and dog walkers are going round cutting the tapes or walking on the course while the race is on. "I always walk my dog here, if a cyclist hits me, I'll sue" and "You've got no right to take over public land, I'll complain to the council"

    Unbelieveable attitude but the council then have to respond to these complaints. Unfortunately, the easiest way to respond is to ban the cause of the complaint (sometimes, like here, using flimsy excuses to try to get around the fact that they don't really understand the issues) rather than spend time and effort reaching a compromise. Occasionally, you also get one jobsworth council person who's dead against "x" (whatever "x" might be) and will do all in their powers to prevent it. Not saying that's the case here (I genuinely don't know) but I've seen it happen before, not just with cycling.

    Sounds like considerably better news than yesterday, hats off to the local riders/organisers and to the various cycling websites for forcing them to rethink.

  • Not so subtle Evans advertising in Daily Mail?1 year 22 weeks ago"She is frequently seen

    "She is frequently seen jogging near her Downing St home..."

    Um, shouldn't that be *our* Downing Street home that we* let them borrow?

    * Albeit unwillingly for many of us

  • Campag Chainring advice?1 year 22 weeks agoThere are companies who do

    There are companies who do chainrings of that size based on a 110mm BCD so it is possible. But as above, unless you are spinning out a 50 - 11 gear, is it worth it?

    Not sure about Miche cranks but Campag compact cranks need specific chainrings because one bolt hole is offset to 113mm BCD. May be worth checking before making a purchase.

    Rob

  • how do you motivate yourself to ride in rubbish weather?1 year 22 weeks agoWould agree with everything

    Would agree with everything above especially Rule 9 and arrange to ride in a group; rides in poor weather are very memorable occasionally for the wrong reasons. I will never forget a ride in a group where we had a snowball fight whilst riding (we were able to reach down and gather snow) and finding myself riding down hill on sheet ice, there were gaps of dry tarmac but none wide enough to stop, so I was able to almost stop and then had to release the brake and pray. I got to what I thought was the end of the ice, found the 'wet' road was black ice and went down like a sack of spuds without a scratch! Mudguards are also a necessary evil. But where cycling and bad weather are concerned the rule that there is no such thing as bad weather just the wrong clothes is worth remembering. Was thinking this all the way round the 100 mile Exmoor Beast this year, I would have paid a lot of money for a pair of overshoes! It was bitter weather but I still finished Cool

  • Just in: Enigma Effusion1 year 22 weeks agoYou can even anodize titanium

    You can even anodize titanium in all sorts of wonderful colors. Which is better than paint.

  • Continental GP 4 Season Tyres - Anyone running these???1 year 22 weeks agoWell, the 4 Seasons arrived

    Well, the 4 Seasons arrived today and I fitted them this evening - just got back from a road test.
    They feel fine and I was genuinely suprised how light they are and they roll really well.

    Thanks for the feedback - I will let you know how they get on but first impressions are that they appear excellent. I have GP4000s's on my 'normal' road bikes (as opposed to the hybrids) and these are comparable with ride quality for sure.

    Hope I end up a satisfied 'convert' as all above.

    Thanks gents. Applause

    Trikeman. Wink

  • Two week Welsh Police campaign sees 1,000 drivers fined for using phone at wheel1 year 22 weeks agomatthewuniverse wrote:"I

    matthewuniverse wrote:
    "I can't see a noticeable difference in talking on my Bluetooth hands free to my wife or talking to her if she was in the car"

    What you can see is irrelevant; studies show it is little different from a handset.

    I work in the mobile industry, and pay a fair bit of attention to this sort of thing. What the research shows is that it's not a dexterity issue (or one-armed people wouldn't be allowed to drive). And many cars these days are autos anyway. What it is is as others have said, a cognitive load issue. You can't visualise/process a conversation and road hazards at the same time. Being hands-free makes no difference, and here's why: people in the car with you you can choose to ignore for a few seconds, and they naturally fall quiet as they can see you are doing something tricky like at a junction, changing lanes etc. they generally help to look as well, it's instinctive adult also-a-driver-too behaviour. If they are on the other end of a phone they cannot see what you are having to deal with, and just blather on, while you feel obliged to pay attention. That's the major difference.

    I fully expect insurance companies to lead here, with no insurance for people found to be talking on mobiles *hands-free or not* in the event of a crash. That, more than any threat of a fine, might put an end to it.

    Also we need much wider awareness of what 3 or 6 points on your licence means: a massive hike in your insurance premiums for the next 3 or 5 years. Several thousands of quid, typically.

  • FS : Now split into components1 year 22 weeks agoJust read your thread

    Just read your thread through. Not after any bikes I'm afraid but just to give a bit of support with the parkinsons. My dad has had it for a bit over 12 years now, so I understand the situation a bit. I was wondering if you had read this:
    http://www.tandems.co.uk/news.php?articleid=61
    which I thought was quite interesting. No personal experience I am afraid - I've not yet persuaded my dad out on a tandem, but I will.
    Best of luck with everything.

  • Bristol 'crossgate: Council now working with CX organisers1 year 22 weeks agoWhile this is undoubtedly

    While this is undoubtedly good news, and hopefully the story will have a happy ending, you have to wonder why it all kicked off in the first place? Where does this ingrained antipathy to cycling come from?

    Road CC and various other pro-cycling websites and pressure groups are very quick to stand up for the sport when the anti-cycling brigade appear on the horizon, and generally speaking, climb-downs and apologies soon follow... but why does it happen? And so regularly? Thinking

  • Not so subtle Evans advertising in Daily Mail?1 year 22 weeks agoAll completely brand new kit!

    All completely brand new kit! Anyone know how much Evans contributes to the tory party?

  • how do you motivate yourself to ride in rubbish weather?1 year 22 weeks agoWhen you bike in the rubbish

    When you bike in the rubbish weather, it makes you realise how much funriding in great weather is.

  • Two week Welsh Police campaign sees 1,000 drivers fined for using phone at wheel1 year 22 weeks agomore to the point Wales

    more to the point Wales hasn't been a Principality since about 1542

  • how do you motivate yourself to ride in rubbish weather?1 year 22 weeks agoApparently, the excersise you

    Apparently, the excersise you get from regular cycling (whatever the weather) encourages you body to release some sort of 'happy hormones' - I always feel great after riding. I commute in all weathers and find (as eluded to above - the tube) I don't get the nasty bugs that inhabit trains, tubes and places where hundreds of people gather - a second class ride beats a first class train every time.

    A close buddie was actually recommended to start cycling to reduce stress/anxiety which he suffered bad with, he was a different person a few weeks into riding to work. I find a great relief when I ride in the rain - some call me mad but I genuinely love it in the rain.

    I do s***t myself (regularly) in the icy weather though. Surprise

    Go for it but don't wreck your new (excellent) bike - good luck with it and get some decent kit to keep you dry (ish) and warm.

    Regards

    Trikeman. Wink

  • how do you motivate yourself to ride in rubbish weather?1 year 22 weeks agoOne other thing, treat your

    One other thing, treat your bike as another member of the family, so when you've thrashed it around, come home and give it a nice clean bath and dry it off thoroughly, it will love you back for longer that way.

    Take care of it and you shall have a longer life with it. Big Grin