• Guernsey judge criticises road layout as lorry driver acquitted of causing cyclist's death1 year 6 weeks agotruffy wrote:Paul_C

    truffy wrote:
    Paul_C wrote:
    they expect the cyclist to give way...

    Given the size of a truck I'd give way. Wouldn't you?

    Yes you, and I, probably would. I can't see how that excuses killing someone who doesn't give way - are we really saying it's fine to kill someone for, at most, a minor traffic violation? Does that mean I can go and shoot the next guy speeding through our village? Or does it only work if I drive a truck over him?

  • fat tax. the time has come1 year 6 weeks agotruffy wrote:Worst trip of my

    truffy wrote:
    Worst trip of my life was stuck between two 'ample gentlemen'

    I know quite a few people who would consider that a bloody good holiday...

  • love him or hate him we needed a lance1 year 6 weeks agonotfastenough wrote:Tell me

    notfastenough wrote:
    Tell me Stanley, what's your views on HGVs, oh and hi-vis?

    and helmets - he can't be a real poster here if he hasn't got a open/biased/selfcentred (delete as applicable) view on helmets.

    Hey and while your at it stanley - what about Froome's TUE - hey and whether or not Specialized deliberately gave Bert a dodgy frame so that Nibbles could win.

  • Which energy drink?1 year 6 weeks agoIf it's not all a bit too

    If it's not all a bit too stereotypically 'health foodsy' for you, blackstrap mollases reportedly contains good levels of most electrolytes other than bog standard salt. I find scooping a teaspoon into a bottle of orange juice with a good pinch of salt contains enough sugars, water and electrolytes to leaves me hydrated and... full of sugar. Which is generally a good thing. OJ's not the cheapest thing to be guzzling down every day, but I only really use it on longer rides anyway. Squash, tea, or anything else could be used as the base liquid, but the mollases and salt are the main electrolytic components, and they're a lot cheaper than powders and the like.

    Also, bananas are a cliched cycle-food because they're cheap, have decent levels of usable energy, and have some potassium as well. Dried apricots are also very good for potassium, as well as sugar, and dates are an excellent sugar hit. I think they all generally work out cheaper than bars. Finally, if all the sweet stuff is overpowering, rice balls (or onigiri) make a satisfyingly savoury alternative to rice cakes, and are very simple to make (http://justhungry.com/2007/01/onigiri_omusubi_revisited_an_e.html). You can balance any of that with gels, and get whatever mix of solid, real food, and sugary goop you find comfortable.

    I'd get a second opinion on the molasses thing though, to make sure it's not just health-food clap-trap. If not, it should be cheaper than buying specialised products that do pretty much the same thing.

    Hope that helps.

  • Guernsey judge criticises road layout as lorry driver acquitted of causing cyclist's death1 year 6 weeks agoHow on earth can the truck

    How on earth can the truck driver be aquitted of killing someone on a pavement? The law is indeed an ass... wonder if that had been a pedestrian or a child in a pram the verdict would have been different?

  • Decent (Enough) Short-Duration Locks1 year 6 weeks agoI wrestled with the same

    I wrestled with the same dilemma a few years back, and then gave in and decided not to carry a lock at all. I frequently stop in village shops and, in the small villages you mostly encounter in the countryside, there's nothing to worry about from a theft point of view. Leave the bike somewhere near the door, pop in and out and you're done. In busier areas, I stop on garage forecourts where there's big windows (so the attendant can see all the pumps) and lots of CCTV. Again, low theft risk for those reasons. Ultimately, I didn't want to carry anything more than I really needed, and sticking to the plans above I feel pretty comfortable that my bike won't go anywhere without me!

  • tour de france. thank god some things are still sacred1 year 6 weeks agoErr, hello? Podium girls? Do

    Err, hello? Podium girls? Do your research man, have you never even watched a stage?

  • Southwark plans crackdown on 20+mph cyclists1 year 6 weeks agocyclingDMlondon wrote:seven

    cyclingDMlondon wrote:
    seven wrote:
    You can't simply make a law that says "it's an offence to step over this here line when you're wearing blue shoes"

    Yes they can. In this country, the government can do whatever it likes, and nothing or nobody can stop it.

    Disabuse yourself of the notion that you live in a democracy.

    Not accurate. A new law has to be presented in a Bill, which is discussed in Parliament. It must then pass the House of Lords before it can receive 'Royal Assent'. All of these are opportunities for your democratically elected representatives to prevent it being made.
    I agree that stopping the Government is not easy, but as recent cases from the European Court have shown, unjust legislation can be overturned.

  • Wiggins: I'd be pissed off if I were Hoy, plus "f*cking Chris Froome"1 year 6 weeks agoI agree with mhmhmh. Anyone

    I agree with mhmhmh. Anyone who choose jam sandwiches above over priced kidology proven go faster drinks, gets my vote.

    .. now where's my High 5 glycogen restoring recovery juice!

  • piaggio mp3 yourban 300 lt (can ride on car license)1 year 6 weeks agotshana1 wrote:No you do not.

    tshana1 wrote:
    No you do not. As long as you have a full UK driving license you can ride this bike without L plates or a cbt. Due to the wider track and inclusion of a foot operated brake, a motorcycle license is not required as it is classed as a trike.

    The rear brake on my motorcycle is foot operated as on most motorcycles. I don't believe a foot operated brake makes too much difference.

  • fat tax. the time has come1 year 6 weeks agoSmokers *are* taxed more,

    Smokers *are* taxed more, because of the health costs. Cigarettes are heavily taxed.

    Further, if an airline did charge people for their weight, that wouldn't be a tax. That'd be a company charging for its costs. At least some airlines *already* do charge morbidly obese people more money, when that person can't fit into a single seat, by making them pay for all the seat space they need.

    Smile

  • Guernsey judge criticises road layout as lorry driver acquitted of causing cyclist's death1 year 6 weeks agoPaul_C wrote:they expect the

    Paul_C wrote:
    they expect the cyclist to give way...

    Given the size of a truck I'd give way. Wouldn't you?

  • fat tax. the time has come1 year 6 weeks agoI see where you're coming

    I see where you're coming from, to a degree, but if we start taxing people for being overweight, where does it stop? Should disabled people pay more, because they need a wheelchair as well as their baggage? Should heavy drinkers or smokers be taxed more to pay for their healthcare? You're on a slippery neo-con libertarian slope there.

  • fat tax. the time has come1 year 6 weeks agotruffy wrote:Worst trip of my

    truffy wrote:
    Worst trip of my life was stuck between two 'ample gentlemen' on an internal flight in the States. Mind you, pretty much all my worst flights have involved the US at some point.

    A +1 for flying business then!

  • Bristol bikeabilty1 year 6 weeks agotherevokid wrote:chapeau that

    therevokid wrote:
    chapeau that lad .... goes to school with my 12 y.o. but she's not got onto
    the courses yet....

    What I thought - good for him.

    Both my kids did a bikability course and it's really helped their cycling on-road. They'd both been riding since they were little and had a bit of road training from me, going to and from football training and so on. But proper instruction from a qualified trainer has made a huge difference and I've seen this benefit their awareness as pedestrians as well.

  • love him or hate him we needed a lance1 year 6 weeks agoHe's taking the p!ss that's

    He's taking the p!ss that's all. Since when did a Yorkshire bloke spend £800 on clothes? Big give-away! Enjoy his posts, they're actually quite amusing.

  • Crack in Giant Defy 2 seat tube1 year 6 weeks agohttps://www.giant-bicycles.co

    https://www.giant-bicycles.com/backoffice/_upload_uk/GIANT_OWNERS_MANUAL...

    Page 3 - Before every ride do the mechanical safety check mentions torque settings
    Page 36/37 - Torque settings

    Page 44 -Not following owners manual.

    That'll be the get outs they'll be using.

  • Crack in Giant Defy 2 seat tube1 year 6 weeks agoSorry but it's what glynr36

    Sorry but it's what glynr36 said. ^^

    It left the shop in good condition - did you take it back for it's free first service? After that, it's your responsibility to ensure that the bike is in good working order. Bolts working loose, cables stretching, spokes twanging a bit, tyres getting cut - they're all common on new bikes which is why shops offer a free first service. If you failed to take it back for that, it might go against any "warranty" claim too.

    Ask the shop nicely - they may be willing to do some sort of deal as a goodwill gesture. Going in there screaming about your "rights" and quoting sale of goods act will result in them telling you to sod off.

  • fat tax. the time has come1 year 6 weeks agobashthebox wrote:It's as much

    bashthebox wrote:
    It's as much for the baggage handlers as anything - picking up heavy bags means more effort and more risk of injury, so they're labelled as being heavy and treated more carefully, I suspect.

    True enough, but missing the point. Heavy items should be labelled for safety of the baggage handlers, but do they also have to be taxed when lard arses aren't?

    Worst trip of my life was stuck between two 'ample gentlemen' on an internal flight in the States. Mind you, pretty much all my worst flights have involved the US at some point.

  • Tour De France Stage 171 year 6 weeks agoTook first penalty, put in

    Took first penalty, put in JRod, Majka & DeMarchi for KOM shootout!

  • Crack in Giant Defy 2 seat tube1 year 6 weeks agoFlying Scot wrote:Don't stand

    Flying Scot wrote:
    Don't stand for it if the shop torqued it last.

    The fact it's not torqued now is not an indication that it wasn't tight enough previously

    At 4 months that's not good enough from the shop, unless they know something we don't.

    Its the end users responsibility to ensure everything is correctly torqued throughout the lifespan of the bike (I'm pretty sure all bike/component instruction sheets come with that disclaimer as well) among other things.

    Would you pursue a warranty claim in a bolt worked loose after 6 months and a component fell off and broke? You'd not stand much chance of getting anything out of it, this is no different.

    realdeal wrote:
    Contact the lbs stating when you bought the bike and that it has developed a fault. For a product to fail in this manner indicates that it's not fit for purpose, Inform them that your contract is with them and as such you will be seeking a full refund for the faulty frame. If you're likely to incur any expenses as a result of not being able to use the bike, then also inform them that if your issue escalates to court proceedings you will claim for damages at that point. Give them a time limit for the matter to be resolved. You do have to give them a certain amount of time to offer you any alternatives (I think it's 2 or 3 weeks but I'm not entirely sure).

    Thats not true though, it is fit for purpose, but if the bolt worked loose (likley over rough roads...) and that damaged it then it's still fit for purpose, and the end user hasn't followed the manufacturers instructions.

    Would you pursue a warranty claim against a puncture on an inner tube? After never checking tyre pressures and them dropping too low and causing a pinch?
    This potentenially is the same thing (though the tube example is a little too simplistic)

  • Bristol bikeabilty1 year 6 weeks agochapeau that lad .... goes to

    chapeau that lad .... goes to school with my 12 y.o. but she's not got onto
    the courses yet....

  • My brother’s not a doper, says Jonathan Tiernan-Locke’s twin sister1 year 6 weeks agoJoeinpoole: Interesting

    Joeinpoole: Interesting information thanks.

    I'd read that part of her defence. It's hard to assess how much it means however, because her argument about the metabolites and the high reading weren't tested as far as I can tell.

    As far as I can tell, her ban was overturned primarily on the poor handling of the B sample as shown by the pH value. Without a valid B sample, there can be no ban. Additionally, I also saw there were papers on how bacteria could produce testosterone. Her argument being that the B sample was stored in heat, allowing bacterial growth and hence testosterone to be produced. However, that argument surely is flawed given that the A and B samples both had the same testosterone ratio?

    So yes, her legal team had other arguments. It's their job to raise every possible doubt against the test results. However, it's not clear to me those arguments ever got to a stage were they had to be tested, as she prevailed on B sample handling issues? So it's hard to know what to make of those other arguments.

    Interesting anyway.

  • Guernsey judge criticises road layout as lorry driver acquitted of causing cyclist's death1 year 6 weeks agothey expect the cyclist to

    they expect the cyclist to give way...

    rule 206 only states this for pedestrians and cyclists at junctions:

    "turning at road junctions; give way to pedestrians who are already crossing the road into which you are turning"

    Until we get cycle paths that continue across side streets with priority, we will continue to get these rubbish decisions

  • Tour De France Stage 171 year 6 weeks agoGerrans DNS

    Gerrans DNS