• Cycling could help reduce £10bn annual diabetes bill say MPs1 year 6 weeks agoAs a type-2 diabetic I am a

    As a type-2 diabetic I am a strong advocate of the financial benefit to society of activities like cycling. My average of 8 hours a week on the bike won't cure my diabetes (it runs through the paternal side of my family) but hopefully my high level of fitness will delay the inevitable heart attack and/or stroke until I am well into my old age (non-productive years). As per the article, the economic benefits of this are significant. Using my father as a case study, I estimated his major stroke cost society $1M over the subsequent 10 years of his life. He was retired so there was no additional loss of economic productivity (e.g. paying taxes) which could easily double the negative impact for a working adult.

    I believe there should be some financial incentive to encourage diagnosed and pre-diabetics to exercise on a regular basis. The goal according to my GP is 3-4 hours of exercise a week (exercise being something that elevates your heart rate into the "green" zone). This could tied into an overall health program where you would be able to encourage annual physicals and quarterly A1C testing. The doctor's role would be to verify and sign off on the "payment".

    While I could half-jokingly make the business case that society should pay me to ride my bike, a cash payment would leave this wide open to abuse. Maybe something as simple as a sales tax exemption for activity related purchases. Your doctor would effectively "prescribe" issuance of an activity card (annually) that you could present went purchasing specified goods and services. Here in Canada we already have a few mechanisms that could serve as templates: tax exemptions on the purchase of a bike (the first $1K) and native status cards which exempt you from all sales taxes.

  • Suisse Rowe1 year 6 weeks agoTERatcliffe26 wrote:The

    TERatcliffe26 wrote:
    The formula calculates the budget based on the field, and then we set the budget...
    So, out of curiosity, what did the formula suggest for the Giro, the Dauphine and the TDS? Thinking ...

  • Transport Minister to consider turning Highways Agency in to Cycling & Highways Agency, say campaigners1 year 6 weeks agoWell hang on a minute. The

    Well hang on a minute. The Highways agency is only responsible for Highways (motorways and major trunk routes) and not for the majority of roads that we cycle on which are the responsibility of the counties roads/highways departments.

    And then there's the fact that putting cycling on the nameplate of a big agency is pretty easy but the facts of life are that the executive of that agency will be focused on the big stuff that will raise merry hell if it goes wrong or runs over budget. The cycle paths, might I suggest will be a sideshow.

    Bad idea in two ways. One it's meaningless. Two, even if it weren't meaningless it would be a classic submerging of an issue by incorporating it into a bigger department's name where it will be ignored as the department has its focus elsewhere.

    Once upon a time in a place called Sandhurst I learned an oft repeated phrase. It was to be remembered and brought to mind, I was told, whenever I saw before me large sweeping movements designed to catch my attention.

    "Never mistake movement for action."

  • Cycloc Loop1 year 6 weeks agoHow big is it compared to

    How big is it compared to Wales

    or Belgium?

  • London cycling culture and bicycle theft1 year 6 weeks agoWell done Ryan, A good survey

    Well done Ryan,
    A good survey with intelligent questions. Hope you get enough responses to make your data valid. I wish you the best of luck.

  • First foray in to the world of mountain bikes1 year 6 weeks agomooleur wrote:Merlin have

    mooleur wrote:
    Merlin have some super duper cheap ones! Big Grin http://www.merlincycles.com/sensa-mountain-bikes-58874/

    Thinking of moving to the dark side this winter, too, let us know how you get on! I'd be interested to know how power on the road bike translates to the MTB Smile

    As a mountain biker???... ok I have ridden it 7 times this year!, who happens to spend most of their time on the road these days. My observations, first power gets you into trouble very quickly! speed can be your friend but a lack of skill* can be a real issue. *mtb is a different skill set to road.

    Biggest difference though is how you ride, on road it tends to be fairly steady state riding constant power for mile after mile, off road is much more akin to sprint rest sprint rest intervals. Off road, I suspect, but don't know, you need to produce far more power but the average power is far lower.

    Where you ride will have an affect but the climbs tend to be shorter but steeper, because tracks are narrower you do tend to coast a bit more.

    One thing to learn is to let the bike go, some roadies tend to get a bit tense when the bike starts to drift on gravel and mud, off road it will happen.

    Oh and always look where you want to go, NEVER look at the trees or rocks because you will go where you look!

  • Sneak peek: Holdsworth to launch steel Heritage range1 year 6 weeks agoSo.Much.Want

    So.Much.Want Cool

  • Cyclist’s naked toilet stop in field drives Yorkshire farmer potty1 year 6 weeks agoFarmer objects to human

    Farmer objects to human pooing in field that he has either set aside for animals to poo in or that he is going to dump loads of chemicals in at some point to increase yield?
    Farmers = custodians of the countryside and fucking hypocritical Tory badger killing scum.

  • Suisse Rowe1 year 6 weeks agoThe formula calculates the

    The formula calculates the budget based on the field, and then we set the budget. The budget is the same for all at the end of the day

  • Critérium du Dauphiné stage 51 year 6 weeks agoI'm doing so bad I can't even

    I'm doing so bad I can't even pick the Lanterne Rouge At Wits End

  • Transport Minister to consider turning Highways Agency in to Cycling & Highways Agency, say campaigners1 year 6 weeks agomore police, better

    more police, better enforcement, then a willingness for the CPS to go after drivers, Magistrates who punish drivers,

    Then maybe we will start getting somewhere.

    There is no point banning phones unless the law is enforced.

  • Transport Minister to consider turning Highways Agency in to Cycling & Highways Agency, say campaigners1 year 6 weeks agoElephant & Castle? How about

    Elephant & Castle? How about this

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwyV9o5ILF0

    It will never, ever happen anywhere is this country but we can dream. Day Dreaming

  • Cycling could help reduce £10bn annual diabetes bill say MPs1 year 6 weeks agopmanc wrote:oozaveared

    pmanc wrote:
    oozaveared wrote:

    People are massively shocked when they learn how few calories they'll burn for what (to them) may seem like a lot of exercise.
    ......
    As a old git pessimist I'd say that the sort of people that are obese are also the sort of people that will reward their 10 mile bike ride with a donut or two.

    I do take the point, but I think the issue is often over-simplified: calories in vs calories burned. And I've sometimes found the opposite of your donut concern can be true.

    Namely, if I spend my journey home from work sitting sedentary in a car in a traffic jam, on arriving home I feel sluggish and am more likely to sit on the sofa eating toast. If I cycle briskly, maybe calling in at the pool for an early evening swim, I feel energised and will just crave water to rehydrate.

    In this respect I think exercise, as well as being directly beneficial, can encourage a different perception of oneself and encourage a broader lifestyle change. At the very least, any time you spend exercising isn't time spent idly grazing...

    Admittedly I don't have any evidence to back this up (and I'm not obese).

    That works for me as well. It's endorphins. Exercise increases these hormones associated with the pleasure centres of the brain. It's a mild high and a feeling of well being. And yess that's an appetite suppressant in fitter people. Obese people tend not to have the same reaction to exercise because they don't generally have the ability to exercise long enough to trigger the endorphins. What happens instead is that they get a blood sugar low.

    That's broad brush of course. More importantly though, obese people tend to have habits around using food emotionally. So if they feel low they typically feel inclined have a treat to cheer themselves up. If they feel happy about something they may be inclined to celebrate with a foody treat. Essentially obesity is ais an emotional problem linked to food. Much like alcoholism is an emotional problem linked to alcohol etc etc.

    It's the emotional bit that needs fixing. Otherwise it's will power. That's harder with food than with booze for example because an alcoholic can develop strategies to avoid booze. There's no sensible way to avoid food.

  • Suisse Rowe1 year 6 weeks agoThis budget sucks... What's

    This budget sucks... What's wrong with 150 for both the Dauphine and the Tour de Suisse? Are you guys going off of a formula based on the rider field or just your own discretion?... Waiting By the way, was a formula used for the Giro or the Dauphine? Or were both arrived at by discussion between the game manager and the Boss man?... Thinking

  • Transport Minister to consider turning Highways Agency in to Cycling & Highways Agency, say campaigners1 year 6 weeks agoOne notes that he agrees to

    One notes that he agrees to consider including the infrastucture not that he will.

  • Cycling could help reduce £10bn annual diabetes bill say MPs1 year 6 weeks agoJoeinpoole wrote:oozaveared

    Joeinpoole wrote:
    oozaveared wrote:

    There's another great elephant within your post. The assumption that 'calories' consumed are what makes the difference in weight loss. Not true. It's the consumption of carbohydrates that counts.

    I don't know where you got your nutritional information but that really is utter tosh.

    Weight loss and weight gain via exercise and diet are simple thermodynamics.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laws_of_thermodynamics
    Calories in v Calories out. You can cut carbs out altogether but if you eat net 3000 Kcals of protein per day you will gain weight. If you only ate net 1000 Kcals of carbs you'd lose weight.

    That's not to say that your body won't react in different ways to an imbalance like that but the fact is that Calories Kcals are a measure of energy. Energy in via fuel, energy out via metabolic function and exercise.

    According to the voodoo that some witch doctor has convinced you of, the person living on a bowl of rice and some veggies a day and who's very active is going to get fat. But if you just had 30 portions of eggs and bacon and sat on a sofa you'd be getting thinner. No carbs see?

    OK that's a perjorative analogy to make the point, but you know that the analogic example would be false so why do you believe it's true as an essential fact?

    One of the main reasons why some people find it hard to lose weight (apart from not wanting to enough) is that all kinds of voodoo about weird metabolisms, heavy bones and special magical types of food lead to odd diets flying around all the time. Nutrition and balance are important ideas but not the main point with weight loss.

    All the diets work, if they work at all, on the same basis, net calorie reduction. Eating less fuel in and exercising more energy out That's the case because that's the only thing that can work.

    Many diets will offer a significant reduction in carbs. I think that's where you got confused. Yes if you cut carbs from your diet it will be a lot easier to keep the net Kcals down, than if you don't. Hence lots of diets focus on cutting carbs out. But it's not the lack of carbs that is working. It's the reduction in Kcals that cutting out generally calorie richer carbs provide. Cutting carbs is an easy win in the overall goal of cutting Kcals.

    Sorry to be a dog in a manger about it but people (not necessarily here) need a clear message. Eat less move more. Not some quackery disseminated to make a quid out of a huge money spinning weight loss industry where a simple clear message will kill the golden goose.

  • What's on in Bike Week 2014: your round-the-UK guide1 year 6 weeks agoTo anyone who is considering

    To anyone who is considering the Naked Bike Ride in London, I would heartily recommend it. I rode the Hastings event a couple of weeks ago and it was a great experience. I'm even going to be in the London area on Saturday, so if I can find a bike, might ride this one too.

  • Cyclist’s naked toilet stop in field drives Yorkshire farmer potty1 year 6 weeks agoAs any parent knows, IT IS

    As any parent knows, IT IS ONLY POO. If you've never had another person's poo on or near you, you're either childless, or going to the wrong parties.

    Nobody ever had the squits cycling? You're not trying hard enough/eating enough gels.

    I wrecked myself dashing around Ireland. On the fourth day I had spasms as though the Four Horsemen were upon me. It was enter Dublin to greet my wife covered in squits or find a bushel. So I found a bushel. And some nice wipey leaves.

    Matt Stephens has got caught out too. Poo is the great leveller. Ask The Queen (don't).
    http://www.vulpine.cc/Blog/bikes-tech/matts-musings-1

    Nature can catch us unawares. Especially if you're pushing Nature's limits. Its a little unfair (actually its bullying) to try and uncover the identity of someone who is probably (and rightly so) mortified. Keith, be nice, use your time for good, not evil.

    Though my argument is somewhat undermind by the presence of toilet paper........ Maybe he has 'issues'. Sick

  • Critérium du Dauphiné stage 51 year 6 weeks agoLooking forward to getting my

    Looking forward to getting my 10 stage points badge.

    This has been my worst result in any competition so far. Inversely proprtional to the amount of time I spent on my team before it started.

    Suisse was picked in 10 mins flat, Dauphine took me days to hone my pathetic showing.

  • Sergio Henao back racing after tests - can he make Sky's Tour de France team?1 year 6 weeks agooh, daddyELVIS doesnt seem

    oh, daddyELVIS doesnt seem the sort to rush to his already-formed conclusions. Not at all. No.

  • Cyclist’s naked toilet stop in field drives Yorkshire farmer potty1 year 6 weeks agogiff77 wrote:Haven't done

    giff77 wrote:
    Haven't done Glastonbury. But some of my memories of other festival bogs were that of a plank of wood with a hole cut into it suspended above a huge pit lined with industrial tarp. Sick Sick Sick Slurry tanks were brought in to drain the offending mixture.

    Glastonbury's Long Drops are truly a sight to behold. Huge pits filled with everything. Drugs, phones, keys, passports, money. You're not getting it back once its landed down there.

  • Cycling could help reduce £10bn annual diabetes bill say MPs1 year 6 weeks agooozaveared wrote: People are

    oozaveared wrote:

    People are massively shocked when they learn how few calories they'll burn for what (to them) may seem like a lot of exercise.
    ......
    As a old git pessimist I'd say that the sort of people that are obese are also the sort of people that will reward their 10 mile bike ride with a donut or two.

    I do take the point, but I think the issue is often over-simplified: calories in vs calories burned. And I've sometimes found the opposite of your donut concern can be true.

    Namely, if I spend my journey home from work sitting sedentary in a car in a traffic jam, on arriving home I feel sluggish and am more likely to sit on the sofa eating toast. If I cycle briskly, maybe calling in at the pool for an early evening swim, I feel energised and will just crave water to rehydrate.

    In this respect I think exercise, as well as being directly beneficial, can encourage a different perception of oneself and encourage a broader lifestyle change. At the very least, any time you spend exercising isn't time spent idly grazing...

    Admittedly I don't have any evidence to back this up (and I'm not obese).

  • Cyclist’s naked toilet stop in field drives Yorkshire farmer potty1 year 6 weeks agogiff77 wrote:timfearn

    giff77 wrote:
    timfearn wrote:
    That's effing disgusting - he should do what surfers do and soil his skinsuit.

    Or carry a ziplock bag, especially if he took time to carry bog roll
    When I go hill walking and end up staying out overnight I carry a zip lock bag with me and carry the stuff off the hills with me as you are meant to do. There are some popular routes around the country that have human waste left and it's totally gross.

    Of course the easiest solution is to have a dump before you leave for your ride.

    Yep, not always possible to avoid having to take a dump but it isn't that hard to be prepared as I was always taught in the scouts. He could've gone behind a bush and saved the farmer an unfortunate sight too. Farmer Giles has every right to be annoyed in this case.

  • Cycling could help reduce £10bn annual diabetes bill say MPs1 year 6 weeks ago"Cyclists were around half as

    "Cyclists were around half as likely to have diabetes as drivers."

    Grr. As if cycling and driving are mutually exclusive. I cycle and drive so does that mean I'm half as likely as myself to get diabetes?

    I support their aims though. If everyone replaced a few of their car journeys with cycling and changed nothing else, they'd be better off. It would be a lot cheaper than stomach stapling and diabetes treatment as well, even if they gave out free bikes to all.

  • Cyclist’s naked toilet stop in field drives Yorkshire farmer potty1 year 6 weeks agoWE WANT TO SEE THE PICTURE

    WE WANT TO SEE THE PICTURE