• Let's ban the word "cyclist"1 year 5 weeks agoIf you take the word cyclist

    If you take the word cyclist from us, the term MAMIL's will really take off

  • Tour de France Stage 161 year 5 weeks ago1.2.17.19.20

    1.2.17.19.20

  • Limited Edition Tinkoff-Saxo (Team Edition ) Kit1 year 5 weeks agoI'm the prat? Yeah, because

    I'm the prat?

    Yeah, because I'm the one that tried to flog one of the ugliest kits in cycling that they got as a freebie for a vastly inflated price to people who knew better, and is still unable to get rid of it despite slashing the price and resorted to lying about it being sold to save face on an internet forum.

    ps, I'll stick a like your on your post, hopefully then this whole sorry saga will have been worthwhile in some way for you.

  • Tour de France Stage 161 year 5 weeks agoThat is all

    Sick Sick Sick Sick At Wits End At Wits End Crying Crying Crying

    That is all

  • My brother’s not a doper, says Jonathan Tiernan-Locke’s twin sister1 year 5 weeks agoThere will be enough spiteful

    There will be enough spiteful vitriol being bashed out on the interweb to sink an aircraft carrier, never mind one young cyclist's career. If he really is innocent (and yes, it's possible) then I feel very, very sorry for him.

    The fact is that his bio-passport anomalies could not be adequately explained. By the rules of the sport this means he is banned. You can argue the semantics all you like but that's the essence of it.

  • Limited Edition Tinkoff-Saxo (Team Edition ) Kit1 year 5 weeks agoWhat a weird thread. Also,

    What a weird thread.

    Also, why is dwightcrazy listed as 0 posts?

  • Chris Snook's 5th generation Genesis Volare 953 race bike1 year 5 weeks agoSimmo72 wrote:Having gone

    Simmo72 wrote:
    Having gone from ultra light carbon fibre to a Ti frame this year, I hold no reservations about the weight. Clearly it would be noticeable going up a french alp, but then I would be a lot more stable coming down the other side. For day to day riding, i'm more comfortable and therefore faster (strava says so), I'm not going back....but I might get back on steel in the future.

    I rode on my shop ride the other night, the only person on metal, and enjoyed riding off the front on the steepest hill, the bike is only 1 element.

    I love the fact that steel is still proving to be a good material, but there is enough choice of materials out there for everyone. If you are the person that weighs every component and is convinced that 0.5kg is going to make a difference then go carbon, it has a lot of merits but weight is not everything.

    I like the idea of my next bike being metal, but I am developing a 'thing' for loads of BB stiffness and that 'chuckable' side-to-side feeling when out of the saddle. Do you think still leaves steel and Ti in the picture for me?

  • Limited Edition Tinkoff-Saxo (Team Edition ) Kit1 year 5 weeks agoYou certainly are a right

    You certainly are a right prat! Especially getting your girlfriends to like your posts.

    PS - you missed some clicks and copy/pastes but I'll let you off.

  • Aerozine Titanium Axle Road Skewers1 year 5 weeks agoI don't know, but they fit

    I don't know, but they fit both my hybrid and road bike just fine Smile Though, the diameter of the skewer itself is less than that of my shimano skewers.

  • My brother’s not a doper, says Jonathan Tiernan-Locke’s twin sister1 year 5 weeks agoOh, and yes, should a lab

    Oh, and yes, should a lab make a mistake, it could be very difficult for athletes to prove them wrong. However, that's what the B samples are for.

    Note that anti-doping was somewhat in its infancy in the mid-90s. WADA didn't come into being until the late 90s (99?). They've done a lot to standardise things and make procedures rock-solid. E.g. the UCI tried to discredit WADA accredited lab procedures that led to Lance Armstrong's EPO (non-sanctionable) positive with the Vrijman report (buddy of Hein's). WADA tightened things up further in response to that.

    Finally, if an athlete is worried the anti-doping labs might screw up, nothing stops that athlete lodging separate samples with other accredited labs that they believe are better run.

    Funny how they don't do that.

  • My brother’s not a doper, says Jonathan Tiernan-Locke’s twin sister1 year 5 weeks agoJoeinpoole: Part of the basis

    Joeinpoole: Part of the basis of her case was that the pH of the B sample was out of spec and different to the A sample, providing evidence that it been mishandled / degraded.

    There's a detailed discussion in this book:

    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=6ZFEAAAAQBAJ&pg=PA161&lpg=PA161&dq=mo...

    Scroll back to page 155 for the beginning. Note that the descriptive text sometimes refers to "samples", but the actual text quoted seems to make it clear Modahl's legal argument was based on the B sample being degraded. Later descriptive text (e.g. on page 162) seems also to make it clear the issue was the B sample handling.

    Reading the thing again, if footnote 23 on page 161 is true, then that would make you wonder a lot about procedures at this lab. That said, note paragraph 13 in the court of appeal judgement at:

    http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2001/1447.html

    "As to the first, although [the Independent Appeal Panel] noted that there were unsatisfactory features relating to the evidence as to the chain of custody, it was satisfied that nothing had occurred to cast any real doubt on the reliability of the findings. As to the second, it concluded that there was no justification for the argument that the laboratory had not been properly accredited, but that there had been some departures from best practice in relation to the analysis in particular of sample A, as to which the pH value had not been noted. Nonetheless it concluded that these did not cast any real doubt on the reliability of the findings. As to the third, it was satisfied that the samples were the appellant's. The problem which was identified, however, was that the pH value of the B sample was such as to show bacterial degradation of the sample to an extent which caused some of the experts called to give evidence which questioned whether the sample should have been analysed at all. The tribunal concluded that it was proper for the laboratory to analyse the sample as the question was essentially one of reliability. As to the fourth issue, it concluded that the analyses had been properly carried out. "

    The judgement seems to go on to affirm this panel acted in good faith and properly in reaching those conclusions.

    Basically, it seems to me that Mohdahl got off because she was able to raise reasonable doubt about the validity of the B test. She did not show why the A sample test would have been invalid, though her side makes claims about general handling issues during the B test that would make you wonder about that lab. However, the pH of her A-sample was fine, unlike the B.

    I wouldn't want to bet my house on her having been clean though.

  • Aerozine Titanium Axle Road Skewers1 year 5 weeks agoMmhmm. And how long were

    Mmhmm. And how long were they?

  • My brother’s not a doper, says Jonathan Tiernan-Locke’s twin sister1 year 5 weeks agoPaul J wrote: Joeinpoole:

    Paul J wrote:

    Joeinpoole: That's interesting. Agreed sometimes the labs fail to meet standards. Looking into the Diane Mohdahl case, it's not quite as clear cut. Her B sample had been improperly handled in a way that introduced doubt over its result. However, her A sample *also* had tested positive (or there'd been no need for the B). There were no handling issues with her A sample. So it's not quite correct to say she was definitely innocent, rather the procedures weren't followed to allow her to ban to be sustained.

    I don't think it is true that the A sample was handled any differently from the B sample. Can you provide a link to where you have read this please?

    One of the factors that undermined the authorities case was the "simply astounding" levels of testosterone found in the sample'. This is an extract from The Independent at the time;

    "The level of testosterone is measured by establishing its presence in relation to another hormone, epitestosterone. Normally, the ratio is 1 to 1. A ratio of up to 9 to 1 for men and 6 to 1 for women is allowed in athletics. The test which resulted in Ben Johnson being banned for life showed a ratio of 10.3 to 1. Modahl's ratio was 42 to 1."

    http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/athletics-modahl-and-british-official...

  • Tour de France Stage 161 year 5 weeks agoI can't believe this guy...

    I can't believe this guy... Thinking PolishDave is at it again after having won the Giro! D Oh

  • The bikes of the Tour de France1 year 5 weeks agoIf you'd told me that the Sky

    If you'd told me that the Sky Pinarello had just been run over by a truck, I'd have believed you...

  • My brother’s not a doper, says Jonathan Tiernan-Locke’s twin sister1 year 5 weeks agoThis is a mixture of

    This is a mixture of speculation, and first hand reports... so happy to admit it may not survive serious scrutiny...

    Should have stopped there... Why is it necessary to construct a convoluted conspiracy theory? A bio passport sanction is based on expert analysis that identifies biological data that is consistent with illegal performance enhancement and cannot be explained by natural variability. An outcome like this does not occur because someone had a quick look at the figures and thought they might be dodgy, or because someone has been training hard and is a bit tired.
    I think the bio passport is fairer for athletes, because it looks at an extended pattern of behaviour, rather than relying on a spot check single test. So a Diane Modahl case is actually less likely to occur. It's telling that someone is going back 20 years for an example of a testing failure anyway. Not saying it doesn't happen, but I don't think there are scores of innocent athletes being screwed over by the system here...

    I think the UCI owes both JTL and the public a more detailed explanation of what he's supposed to have done. Or are we now simply to accept a finding of 'guilty' without supporting evidence being shown?

    Personally, I expect the supporting evidence to be presented and challenged by appropriate experts through the official process, in the same way as any legal procedure.
    Why would anyone assume that the evidence in this case has not been debated properly, or that the athlete has not had the opportunity to defend their position?

  • fish and chips versus energy bars1 year 5 weeks agoAll those little 6-for-£1

    All those little 6-for-£1 breakfast snack bars in the supermarket, plus malt loaf, fig rolls and bananas. Energy bars just taste like premium-priced cardboard.

    Electrolyte drinks though, are ace. If I don't get my fill of salts, the cramps and headache are awful. Although this can mean that I treat myself to crisps instead.

  • Team sky1 year 5 weeks agofarrell wrote:If you are

    farrell wrote:
    If you are using Manchester United before last season as your definition of an average team, then the results are going to be somewhat skewed.

    Quite the opposite. I'm using them as an example of a superlative, dominant team, one that can reasonably expect to achieve their core target for the season. Which Sky have not done this year.

  • Team Sky’s approach to nutrition + video1 year 5 weeks agoAgree - would be a shame to

    Agree - would be a shame to see road.cc go down the B**eR***r route of every other "article" being an badly disguised advert. It's thankfully rare on here

  • My brother’s not a doper, says Jonathan Tiernan-Locke’s twin sister1 year 5 weeks agofarrell wrote:notfastenough

    farrell wrote:
    notfastenough wrote:
    The problem of course is the use of a sacrificial lamb

    Really? This is what I can't see. Why would Brailsford invest time, energy and British Cycling resources only to then use a Tour of Britain winner as doping cannon fodder?

    No, I don't mean that. More that as Jimmy's post says, given all those factors outlined, he was only ever going to be guilty. Allowing that to be the case without a robust challenge and support (by whichever stakeholder) was the sacrificial aspect I was referring to. I'm not suggesting a conspiracy or anything, perhaps just an acceptance of the 'perfect storm' of contributory factors.

    Ultimately, how could he feasibly prove his innocence? I can prove I own car A, but I can't prove I've never owned car B. Guilty until proven innocent is fundamentally flawed.

  • Limited Edition Tinkoff-Saxo (Team Edition ) Kit1 year 5 weeks agoHighlight text - Right click

    Highlight text - Right click - search for "....." - left click. It really is a piece of piss.

    You'd be better served in your salesman ways if you learned that you shouldn't shit in someone's lunch box and then try and tell them its a Lion bar.

  • Jersey finally passes mandatory helmet law - for under 14 year olds1 year 5 weeks agoI love this debate.... I

    I love this debate....

    I think the reality is that very few of us will change our opinion either way as to helmets use.

    I say wear what you like on your head, there is plenty of evidence either way that your choice is the wrong one, so do what is right for you.

    However, what I will figh,t and fight all day long against, is legislation forcing people to wear helmets.

    Even if helmets saved every head every time, the risk of hitting that head in the first place is so small it negates the need for legislation... of criminalising people who are simply looking to utilise a healthy, sustainable and frankly fun means of transport.

  • My brother’s not a doper, says Jonathan Tiernan-Locke’s twin sister1 year 5 weeks agoJimmy Ray Will: Well, the

    Jimmy Ray Will: Well, the bio-passport is a test, and it's flagged him, and experts have looked at it and concluded his values are very likely indicative of banned manipulation, unless he can provide some other explanation.

    You could argue the bio-passport is far from perfect, and I'd have to agree with you. On the other hand, if always-perfect is made the bar, then that's the end of anti-doping. Not even the criminal justice system, with its "beyond reasonable doubt", manages to get it 100% right.

    Joeinpoole: That's interesting. Agreed sometimes the labs fail to meet standards. Looking into the Diane Mohdahl case, it's not quite as clear cut. Her B sample had been improperly handled in a way that introduced doubt over its result. However, her A sample *also* had tested positive (or there'd been no need for the B). There were no handling issues with her A sample. So it's not quite correct to say she was definitely innocent, rather the procedures weren't followed to allow her to ban to be sustained.

  • fish and chips versus energy bars1 year 5 weeks agoThere's definitely something

    There's definitely something in the 'real food' argument -(though just fish and chips perhaps a bit too heavy) -I had my first proper bout of cramps and muscle spasms on a very long, hilly ride last month - cereal bars, gels, chocolate, isotonic drinks and hi five, caffeine etc and yet the lack of salt plus hard efforts over hills really screwed me up! I couldn't stomach any more gels or bloks/ sugary water and only got better after pork pies, peanuts, sandwiches and massage!

    Moral of the story -you need a good range of salty, savoury food as well as carbs and quickly absorbed gels etc for fast endurance riding

  • Trek World 2014 - Lots of shiny 2015 bikes (all of them Treks) we take a look1 year 5 weeks agoTrekBikesUK wrote:In the

    TrekBikesUK wrote:
    In the meantime, I'd be happy to give you any additional information about some of the bikes...

    I'd really like to know what the colour scheme/detailing is going to be on the Domane 2.3 for 2015 - as I'm now holding off getting a new bike till it comes out! Any chance of some images? Smile