• Third of cyclists support mandatory hi-viz clothing claims survey1 year 8 weeks agoNeil753

    Neil753 wrote:
    FluffyKittenofTindalos wrote:
    You also totally ignore the downside of high-viz day-glo pink & yellow clown gear. That it marks out cyclists as an outgroup of oddballs not worthy of any respect.

    So here I am, trying to emphasise the vital need (in public forums) not to demonise cyclists who wear hi-vis...
    and you come up with this?

    Given some of the powers that be who read cycle forums, I think your comment, perhaps more than any other I've seen, has just moved us further towards compulsion.

    Well, I was trying my best to be polite, but probably slipped a bit there. But you need to recognise _that_ is how many non-cyclists see high-viz cyclists. You seem to be unaware of that.

    Just look at any number of anti-cyclist hate-articles in the press by the likes of McKenna or Melissa Kite. Wearing high-viz is counterproductive when it comes to the politics of cycling. It discourages people from seeing cycling as an acceptable means of tranport rather than an odd special-interest hobby and a sport, and hence taking it up themselves, and it encourages aggressive and hostile attitudes from petrolheads.

    Can you show us the solid evidence that lurid yellow and orange actually saves lives? That seems like something you ought to be starting with, before telling people to wear it, no? I don't mean a single anecdote of 'oh I can see him better because unlike most motorists I'm actually looking!', I mean a study that takes into account the multiple effects, including social ones.

    And stop conflating high-viz with reflective material.

    And, as with helmets, if they made it compulsory I'd just give up cycling again,

  • Third of cyclists support mandatory hi-viz clothing claims survey1 year 8 weeks agoTo be fair to Sky, they

    To be fair to Sky, they don't. They dish out free hi-viz if you want one, but you can ride without.

    I know cos I did (without a helmet as well I am so reckless). And I refused the vest out of principle! Dishing them out does perpetuate the myth of hi-viz though, and would prefer that they didn't.

  • Giro Air Attack helmet1 year 8 weeks ago" I started using the Air

    " I started using the Air Attack a few weeks ago when the weather was quite a lot hotter than it is now – in the mid-20s – and conditions inside the helmet were a bit warmer and more humid than usual, but not nearly to the degree that I'd expected"

    Hmmm, I can see that being an issue here where its 20c on my 5am rides and usually high 20s to mid 30s on club rides at the weekend all year round.

  • Cycloc Wrap1 year 8 weeks agoAm I the only bloke to still

    Am I the only bloke to still put his trouser leg under the sock? Thinking

  • CX bike with slicks on group rides - any chance of holding on?1 year 8 weeks agoMy CX with Racing Ralph

    My CX with Racing Ralph knobblies is only about 0.5 mph slower than my carbon framed road bike with slicks. With the road wheels it is the same as my road bike, just one with cantilever brakes. Fwiw, I find the Avid Shorty 4 cantis very good indeed, and it allows me to use my road wheels.

  • Pilgrimage to Flanders - a cyclist’s chance to endure cobbled roads and extreme suffering.1 year 8 weeks agoI'm not sure if this

    I'm not sure if this qualifies you are a bike rider or crazy loon. That's quite something! I can see the appeal of the cobbles even if they are somewhat of a novelty but at that distance and especially with that weather? Crazy! Throw in some sportive riders slip sliding and falling all around you and well, hmmm. Bravo is all I can say! Maybe I'll head over in the summer on my lonesome...

  • Third of cyclists support mandatory hi-viz clothing claims survey1 year 8 weeks agoFluffyKittenofTindalos

    FluffyKittenofTindalos wrote:
    You also totally ignore the downside of high-viz day-glo pink & yellow clown gear. That it marks out cyclists as an outgroup of oddballs not worthy of any respect.

    So here I am, trying to emphasise the vital need (in public forums) not to demonise cyclists who wear hi-vis...
    and you come up with this?

    Given some of the powers that be who read cycle forums, I think your comment, perhaps more than any other I've seen, has just moved us further towards compulsion.

  • Canyon Sizing1 year 8 weeks agoThanks Tom, measurements

    Thanks Tom, measurements below. No idea whether those proportions are normal or not.

    Height 187cm
    Inseam 89cm
    Torso length 62cm

  • Canyon Sizing1 year 8 weeks agoMy Ultimate AL is a 58cm and

    My Ultimate AL is a 58cm and I'm 184cm. You do seem borderline and it will depend on your torso<>leg length proportions.

  • Canyon TT bikes, reviewed?1 year 8 weeks agoTom Amos wrote:Tangential

    Tom Amos wrote:
    Tangential point. I have the ultimate al with Di2 and it goes like stink. I would imagine you won't be disappointed. It's also surprisingly comfortable.

    100% agree. I have had the same bike as Tom since July 2012 and I'm totally happy with it, no thoughts of replacing it whatsoever. At the time I was thinking of building up a Van Nicolas frame with Di2, but reality intervened! I recently hired exactly that build on holiday and it felt sluggish, so I'm even happier.

    Also, a very experienced mate recently bought a Canyon Ultimate CF SL, and he is absolutely smitten.

  • Cycloc Wrap1 year 8 weeks agoThis looks great – but why is

    This looks great – but why is it £12.99. Are they designed by Paul Smith or something? Crying

  • CX bike with slicks on group rides - any chance of holding on?1 year 8 weeks agoThose 3 bikes will all be

    Those 3 bikes will all be good. The only negative i heard when researching was problems with the cannondale fork handling disc brakes, but that may have just something i saw on a couple of forums, maybe just a batch of forks that were wonky. There seems lots of happy owners of the Kinesis and they are UK based. Canyons look great and are great value. I would have bought one if they were available. In the end I got last years Boardman for £650 and it is perfect. I did 70 miles on muddy forest tracks and lanes yesterday- great fun!

    Wheels wise I am doing exactly the same as you. Just get a spare 135 wheel (mtb spacing) for any of those frames I imagine. Almost all disc frames are 135 now.

  • Third of cyclists support mandatory hi-viz clothing claims survey1 year 8 weeks agoWhat's the quote - There are

    What's the quote - There are lies, damded lies and statistics.

    Would the same organisation make pedestrians where hi-viz when crossing the road, the majority of whom do not carry lights with them after dark and a fair few where black.

  • Ultegra Pads are rubbish in the wet1 year 8 weeks ago+1 for Swiss Stop green,

    +1 for Swiss Stop green, although I had to use their standard (blue or black) compound on the rear to get rid of a nasty squeal.

  • Steering geometry1 year 8 weeks agoThe trail will be increased

    The trail will be increased if you fit a fork with a less offset / rake, this will not really affect the slowness of the steering this is affected more by the head angle.

    The toe overlap, if you have some, will be increased by the 2mm, you shouldn't really notice this though. This site is well worth a look- http://yojimg.net/bike/web_tools/trailcalc.php

    Having said all the above, I would be surprised if the twitchiness is being caused by the frame geometry, as most manufacturers will have this element of the design pretty much sorted and tested, and would generally err on the safer (more trail) side of the line.

    So I would be inclined to check a few things first, all of which will be a lot cheaper than a new pair of forks.
    a). Check the headset bearings, worn bearings are probably the main cause of twitchy unpredictable steering, has this issue always been there? or has is recently started and gradually got worse? if this is the case I would be checking the following.
    b). Check the tyre sizes are the same size, a smaller tyre on the front would reduce the trail. You could fit larger tyres.
    c). Has the bike ever been involved in a crash? could it be out of track?
    d). Your position being sorted could help things, it would be worth getting this looked at for a number of reasons, but I think the problems you have re. the steering are more likely to be caused by a). b). or c). above.

    www.hewittcycles.co.uk

  • My year 2013.1 year 8 weeks agoThanks Dave. I have a plan so

    Thanks Dave. I have a plan so we will have to see how thatgoes.Smile

  • Decathlon unveils 2014 B'Twin road range1 year 8 weeks agoVelly Interesting though I

    Velly Interesting though I don't much like the look of the Mach frame + brakes down in the wet at the back only time will tell!! Thinking

  • Are police fining 'speeding' cyclists in Richmond Park exceeding their authority?1 year 8 weeks ago"The problem with the Royal

    "The problem with the Royal Parks"

    The problem with the Royal Parks is that motor vehicles are allowed in there at all.

  • Woman who doored cyclist fined £1331 year 8 weeks agoFluffyKittenofTindalos

    FluffyKittenofTindalos wrote:
    Guyz2010 wrote:
    Accidents happen.
    The answer is to cycle where you can away from stationary cars. If it means cycling further out in the lane then so be it. Roads are really for driving on not parking.
    I've come close on occasions but ride defensively to avoid it.

    But you can't actually do that, a lot of the time - you have no choice.

    Firstly there are the narrow roads with parking on both sides, where a car comes the other way straight at you at speed and you have to swerve into the door-zone to avoid being hit.

    Then there's the main roads with parked cars plust very fast moving traffic and you either go into the door zone or have cars coming up behind you at 60mph.

    And finally (and I might be kind-of imagining this one, but they certainly _look_ like this is the case) there are the roads with cars parked both sides that are so narrow the door-zones seem to meet in the middle.

    Really, what is needed is a strict division of roads into either through-roads or parking roads. Instead every single road seems to get used for both.

    You always have a choice, if a driver can't pass you then tough, if they get aggressive just call the police, they soon run off.

  • Third of cyclists support mandatory hi-viz clothing claims survey1 year 8 weeks agoIt's probably being mentioned

    It's probably being mentioned before but you do wonder why a supposed pro cycling website is running a article from a survey seemingly done by a motoring interest organisation to seemingly further their agenda...

    2/3 don't ; )

  • Are police fining 'speeding' cyclists in Richmond Park exceeding their authority?1 year 8 weeks agoTony wrote:trisc wrote:If

    Tony wrote:
    trisc wrote:
    If Plod stops you and asks "do you know how fast you were going?" You could legitimately say "No. My bicycle does not have a speedometer, nor is one required, so I have no way of knowing."

    I think that could be the basis for a defence.

    Its no more a defence than not having a breathalyser in your car is a defence for drink driving.

    Of course it's a defence, why on earth do you think motor vehicles that can do more than 17mph all have to have speedos fitted? I'll let you into a secret it has bugger all to do with the driving experience and all to do with allowing the driver to accurately stay within the speed limits and to aid successful prosecutions if they fail to do so. If speedos were fitted to cars simply to enhance the driving experience, and merely a coincindence that they helped drivers stick to the speed limit, F1 cars and MotoGP bikes would have them fitted too, and guess what, they don't.

  • Third of cyclists support mandatory hi-viz clothing claims survey1 year 8 weeks agoAs a high-viz, helmet-wearing

    As a high-viz, helmet-wearing cyclist, I don't think anything should be mandatory.

    Make your own choices and deal with the consequences.

  • Ultegra Pads are rubbish in the wet1 year 8 weeks agoSwissstop BXP (BLUE) for

    Swissstop BXP (BLUE) for Allow rims... Used all summer on Campags and now in serious rain on a club run last weekend with some cheaper wheels that came with my bike at purchase .. they work.

    I also found alloy particles in my old brake blocks.. not finding them in the Swisstops yet.

  • Are police fining 'speeding' cyclists in Richmond Park exceeding their authority?1 year 8 weeks agoI, too, have always

    I, too, have always understood 'vehicle' to mean 'motor vehicle' and speed limits apply to them for one main reason they have speedometers, which are meant to be, within a few percent of error, spot on the reading they give you. A 10% error is usually accepted as the norm so the Police will not prosecute for doing 32 in a 30 but probably would at 34 and above. The reason is that in court an accused person could argue they were driving by their speedo and it just happened to be a few percent out. Not sure if there is precedence set at Crown Court level but I expect there is. As the accuracy of the speedo is out of the control of the driver and isn't even part of an MOT some leeway is reasonable.

    Bicycles do not have speedos, hence the difficulty in prosecuting someone who has no idea what speed they are doing at any given time, though I do wonder if an over-zealous Royal Parks cop might suggest my cycle computor is equivalent to a cars speedo. I would argue otherwise and suggest it is only a guide unlike a car speedo, which is engineered with a specific vehicle in mind and therefore more accurate. Also, and most importantly, is the fact that cycles are very light weight bits of kit and even if there was a collision with something or someone it is highly unlikely anyone will receive anything more than minor injuries, unlike motor vehicles, which tend to maim and kill people on a regular basis.

    As far as speed guns are concerned is there any data on whether they are tested on pedestrians, cyclists or anything else, other than the motor vehicles they were designed to be aimed at? I doubt it. So how realiable are they when they are used on cyclists? Aren't cyclists regarded as closer to pedestrians than motor vehicles? Maybe that should be clarified.

    I ride in Richmond Park & Bushy Park regularly and at times my computer indicates speeds in excess of 20mph only to have cars overtake me and zoom off ahead. Indeed, even down the few hills in Richmond Park, cars overtake cyclists and as they are clearly not breaking the speed limit I assume my speed is always less than the limits too. Finally, all the road signs specifying speed limits are the same as the ones on normal roads, which I understand have always been aimed at motor vehicles.

    The problem with the Royal Parks is they are getting a bee in their royal bonnets about cyclists in general as cycling for fitness becomes more popular and especially with those of us using the Parks as relative safe havens on which to exercise. The local amateur cycling club, the London Dynamos, are for ever being targetted for riding too fast for their own good. Frankly, it is simply an example of nimbyism and the sooner someone challenges it the better.

  • Night riding1 year 8 weeks agoThe Fox said, what the hell

    The Fox said, what the hell are you doing out at this time of night?

    Joking aside, I was back home before 9 o clock. That's not particularly late but obviously in the dark, when it's pitch black, it feels late. Maybe the message is, get out there and ride.