• Eric Pickles turns down Cambridge councillors' car vs bike challenge1 year 4 weeks agoallez neg wrote:Mmm, let's

    allez neg wrote:
    Mmm, let's take the piss out of him 'cos he's fat. Yup, both devastatingly original and a brilliant way of gaining the intellectual and moral high ground.

    That said, a train ticket to Cambridge and taxi fare across Cambridge wouldn't cost much (a local bike shop could fund it and get some publicity out of it) so his reason to decline the challenge doesn't really apply.

    I can't help but feel that although taking the piss out of Fatty Pickles may be infantile and rude, I can still do it and retain the intellectual and moral high ground over Mr. Pickles, he's a plonker.

  • Apple patents technology to stop texting while driving - but 6 years on, it's still not live1 year 4 weeks agoCould it be that apple files

    Could it be that apple files hundreds of patents every year with the only intention being to stop their opponents using them without paying or getting the patent first?

  • Apple patents technology to stop texting while driving - but 6 years on, it's still not live1 year 4 weeks agoI would also like to see this

    I would also like to see this implemented into sat-navs so that when the vehicle is in motion the screen goes blank (remember it's illegal to drive and look at an map/A2Z) and only the voice commands are issued.

    If drivers want to change anything they will have to pull over and stop.

  • Cycling in London1 year 4 weeks agoScoob_84 wrote: Just as its

    Scoob_84 wrote:

    Just as its often suggested that lorry drivers should try cycling in London for a day, same could be said for cyclists giving lorry driving a go. I can imagine it being pretty tricky during rush hour.

    I'm sure it is tricky, but that's why they're professional drivers, they should be trained to be able to handle the additional 'trickiness'. Or they simply should not be on the road.

    You can't take a bad situation as an excuse for refusing to do something about that same bad situation. I'm sorry, but the onus here is on the companies that use those vehicles and on the drivers driving them. Not on the cyclists, not even those few who are either confused by the cycle lanes or just lack the common sense to stay away from a lorry.

  • Marcel Kittel says Yorkshire roads will be "very dangerous" for Tour de France peloton (+ video)1 year 4 weeks agosfichele wrote:Ewden Beck,

    sfichele wrote:
    Ewden Beck, 180 degree hairpin on a 25% gradient

    On race day this is gonna be a corner to watch!

    https://maps.google.co.uk/?ll=53.468239,-1.632392&spn=0.007881,0.015364&...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sP3Bch8YjuY

    I rode that one last yr, just got up on my compact 34-27! If its wet with carbon rims it will carnage at the bottom by the bridge. Have they smoothed the road out cause i remember it being a bit lumpy and damp?

  • Cycling in London1 year 4 weeks agoribena wrote: There is

    ribena wrote:

    There is absolutely no recognition of the fact that the lorries can be responsible for the accidents, nor any recognition that the huge blind spots cause problems in cities.

    When safety measures for lorries are discussed, they are brushed aside as not being cost effective. Instead the RHA asks why cycle helmets aren't more widely worn.

    I did see a cement mixer truck with a rear window magnifier lens stuck to its passenger side window yesterday. I was quite impressed with that cheap and easy fix.

  • Bottom Bracket Wear1 year 4 weeks agoRecently swapped a friends

    Recently swapped a friends FSA P.O.S for an Ultegra for about £15. Should be good for 5000k plus.

  • Cycling in London1 year 4 weeks agoJust as its often suggested

    Just as its often suggested that lorry drivers should try cycling in London for a day, same could be said for cyclists giving lorry driving a go. I can imagine it being pretty tricky during rush hour.

  • Chamois cream ... Idiots guide1 year 4 weeks agoI use Chamois Butt'r - really

    I use Chamois Butt'r - really like it. Also got some of the sachets for jersey pockets.

    I did the Ronde Van Vlaanderen this year (full distance) and I reapplied using the sachet around halfway. Fresh and pain free at the end.

    Conversely I did the Lionheart a couple of weeks before and forgot to put any on, pain.

    The Chapeau white tube one is good too, same consistency as Chamois Butt'r but with menthol in which is nice if you're already in discomfort.

  • Cycling in London1 year 4 weeks agoWhilst "staying away from

    Whilst "staying away from lorries" and "not wearing headphones" are good advice, there are a number of accidents involving lorries where these played no part.

    For instance..

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Bowers_%28journalist%29
    "Bowers was cycling to work at the News International building. 100 yards (91 m) from her workplace, on Dock Street, a 32 long tons (33 t) Lynch Haulage aggregate lorry pulled up behind her. The driver, Petre Beiu, was having a hands-free phone conversation at the time, and drove over her twice after forgetting to put the handbrake on."

    One of the main complaints of the CTC is that such incredibly dangerous irresponsible acts are rarely punished. The drive in the above case was fined 2700 pounds.

    The haulage industry also seems reluctant to fit devices that remove the enormous (and nowadays unnecessary) blind spots on lorries. If i drove my car with half the windscreen misted up or covered in snow i'd rightly be stopped by the police, but such bad visibility is accepted as normal for large lorries.

    Instead, as with the comments above, cyclists are blamed for the accidents and told to "stay away". Hence lorries covered in stickers telling cyclists to stay back, and warning speakers announcing a vehicle is turning left.

    Just take a look at their website.
    http://www.rha.uk.net/information/advice_and_information/cyclist_informa...
    http://www.rha.uk.net/docs/Evidence%20to%20London%20Assembly%20on%20cycl...

    There is absolutely no recognition of the fact that the lorries can be responsible for the accidents, nor any recognition that the huge blind spots cause problems in cities.

    When safety measures for lorries are discussed, they are brushed aside as not being cost effective. Instead the RHA asks why cycle helmets aren't more widely worn.

  • Cycling in London1 year 4 weeks agoMust say i agree with Chris82

    Must say i agree with Chris82 comments, nothing wrong with that advice. In an ideal world, the two forms of traffic would be segregated, but this is not always possible in London.

    But on the whole, i do think large articulated lorry's get the respect and distance they deserve. Its the smaller lorry's that don't seem to be afforded the same respect by cyclists, partially because they're not as long and sometimes too irresistible for cyclists to pop up the inside, which in my view compounds their danger by the fact they can be manoeuvrable and quick.

  • Apple patents technology to stop texting while driving - but 6 years on, it's still not live1 year 4 weeks agoI'm very much in favour of

    I'm very much in favour of using technology to combat this problem, but it has to be able to accurately distinguish between driver and passenger, I mean what if you're on the bus? If it relies on wireless interaction with the car itself then most cars don't have that ability. Tougher enforcement is probably a better solution for the time being.

  • Thick as Thieves - Man who stole £2.5k e-bike phones owner for help in recharging it1 year 4 weeks agoOh I can imagine how that

    Oh I can imagine how that conversation went

    *Ring Ring*

    "Hello"

    "Yeah man what you bothering my mum about man I is going to bring my boys round ans stab you up yeah..."

    "You rang me yesterday trying to buy a charger for the bike you stole from me, your mum is not very happy with you"

    "Errrrr...."

    *Click*

    I bet he's white as well and dresses like he is "from the streets". Trousers round his arse, constantly sticking his hand down his trousers, baseball cap at a jaunty angle, carries three mobile phones, a delightful collection of gold sovereign rings from Argos.

    In reality his name is Kev and he is a catering student.

  • Apple patents technology to stop texting while driving - but 6 years on, it's still not live1 year 4 weeks agoantonio wrote:Would it be

    antonio wrote:
    Would it be possible in today's car electronic engines to screen out mobile phone signals with a jamming device? Just a thought.

    Yes, but for a large number of highly valid reasons, a bad idea.

  • Cycling in Derby1 year 4 weeks agoDo you know where abouts in

    Do you know where abouts in Derby you are moving too?

  • Replacing rear hanger — will I need an alignment tool?1 year 4 weeks agoAs has been stated the hanger

    As has been stated the hanger is a disposable component designed to bend/break before the drop out plate gets damaged.

    Your Defy has a fairly chunky lump of cast then machined aluminium forming the drop out plate so that should not be out of line unless you managed to bork the rear triangle beyond repair.

    Most replacement hangers are cut from T6 ally plate, fitting a new one you don't really want to go bending it again to make it work, if you have to bend it then you may wish to consider a new ally frame.

  • I may have found a good reason for a bike helmet!1 year 4 weeks agomd6 wrote:a.jumper wrote:Not

    md6 wrote:
    a.jumper wrote:
    Not definitive, but when I'm a pedestrian, I get more wing mirrors passing me than when I'm on a bike, plus the mirrors pass at greater relative speed. This is obvious because I'm moving about 10mph faster when riding.

    Do you walk in the road a lot then? Because when i am a pedestrian there are lots more wingmorrors passing me, but they are generally MUCH further away. So far away in fact that its a non issue 99.95%* of the time. Its only when i am waiting to cross the road that they are awaywhere near me, and even then unless I'm stood right on the edge of the curb they are still an additional 18 to 24+ inches further away than they would be on the bike.


    Yeah, I live in a village so I walk in the road every time I want to walk anywhere from home. My previous home had an off-road footpath to its front door, but at one end was a roadside pavement that was parked on and the other was a road out of the village which had no pavements. I suspect most roads in this country now are either rural roads with no pavement or urban roads where the pavements can't be used because of parked cars. Those who are fortunate enough to be both outside London (where I understand they're tougher on parking) and able to walk their entire journey on footpaths are rare freaks.

    And that's before I start on my pet hate of the number of tyre tracks along the only pavement in the village, alongside the main road: many drivers won't wait behind a right-turning vehicle and simply drive along the pavement a bit. If you're walking there, it doesn't matter, they expect you to get out of the way. Unsurprisingly, relatively few people walk in such a hostile environment. Sad

    Quote:
    Re helmets, if you want to wear one do, applying the same logic to pedestrians and cyclists is, in my opinion, stretching the logic used to an absurd point. But i guess thats the intention. Make a decision based on the risk you percieve, your acceptance of that risk and the knowledge that a helmet is likely to lessen the severity of any impact to your head, how much difference that will make is again up to you to decide.

    Even better, make a decision based on the measured risks and the knowledge that it's still unproven that helmets will "lessen the severity of any impact to your head" - they help in 0mph falls from the bike onto a flat surface or a kerb (not even onto a stone unless you've got the better Snell-standard helmet), but many have stickers in them saying they're not designs for car crashes, hitting spiky objects and so on, while there are also accusations that they may concussion and strangulation more likely.

    I don't wear dayglo and helmets for walking or cycling, except for extreme conditions. They're almost irrelevant. It would do far more good to stop motor traffic running riot.

  • Apple patents technology to stop texting while driving - but 6 years on, it's still not live1 year 4 weeks agoWould it be possible in

    Would it be possible in today's car electronic engines to screen out mobile phone signals with a jamming device? Just a thought.

  • I may have found a good reason for a bike helmet!1 year 4 weeks agoSimon E wrote:I can't see why

    Simon E wrote:
    I can't see why it is really so difficult to drive 5 or 10 km/h slower so you're BELOW the 110 km/h limit.

    Is that 'watching the speedo' excuse the best you can come up with?


    Indeed. Able to check the speedo enough to stay below the limit + 10% + 2mph but not enough to stay below the actual limit without doing a load of maths? Rolling On The Floor Pull the other one, it's got bells on!

  • Bike building1 year 4 weeks agowow! that's a great list!

    wow! that's a great list! Thanks very much. Looks a bit daunting though Smile

  • Mark Cavendish says aero bikes and helmets have reduced his edge over rivals1 year 4 weeks agosurly_by_name wrote:mooleur

    surly_by_name wrote:
    mooleur wrote:
    Hope that clears things up! Smile

    This is almost as much fun as baiting you over equal prize money for (unequal) women's racing.

    I'm not as clever as Cav (and I am really supposed to be doing something else), but the relevant bit of the first article (I'm on pages 50 and 51) says nothing more than "you need to stand up to generate power but you have to remember that your drag goes up when you do so by virtue of the increase in your frontal area so the increase in drag means your increased power is partly wasted". This seems about as surprising as "ursines defecate in boreal environments". Its consistent with - and I can see how - getting low over your bars a la Cav in the good old days to reduce CDA so that you get to "keep" more of the increased power you derive from standing up. If I am reading it correctly, the author suggests that the best strategy is probably to stand up to start then sit down at just the right point in time. Cav kinda gets there by getting low over his bars. This is the macro aero advantge thing I've already agreed with you on. Unless it's in the pages I can't read over the internet, I don't see how the article provides any evidence or even any commentary about the benefits of aero frames or helmets to a sprinter. (As an aside, it doesn't actually appear that the author actually tested the effect of increased drag from standing up. He refers to "correcting ... calculated" velocity, i.e., he's measured sitting and standing power output then worked out difference in drag sitting and standing then calculated (NOT measured) the difference. This is a bit different to actually measuring what happens, no?)

    As for the other links to research sponsored by the very people who are interested in its outcome, google "Tobacco industry manipulation of research" just for a laugh. Am I wrong, or has Cervelo built a brand around "aero" bikes? And was that the noise of Kask and Specialized (and pretty much everyone else) jumping on the same bandwagon?

    Of course, the placebo effect might mean that if Cav thinks it makes him faster then it will.

    After that - right about the point you descended into hero worship ("not exactly a secret that he's one of the best in the world at suffering"; "excpetionally [sic] clever") and just before you descended into playing the man and not the ball - I kind of lost the thread of your argument.

    Cav has actually grown on me. I used to hate him, especially when he opened his mouth. But jesus he was fast. Now I actually have a bit of time for him - I particularly like the fact that he seems to recognise his place in the sport as a whole, including its development and its history. He's not as fast as he used to be, or others have gotten faster or both - and that's good (in my opinion), 'cause I don't like foregone conclusions and a hard fought victory is always better to watch than an easy one. But I guess I'm a bit too old for heroes, at least ones drawn from the world of sport.

    At the risk of descending into the personal - the other thing about getting old is that I'm reconciled to my own shortfallings/don't feel the need to tell everyone how wonderful I am. But if you need to work out your insecurities then you go ahead and post your high school results, your Mensa scores, whatever works for you babe.

    Unfortunately hair hasn't been a problem for me for many years now (but I am cool about that as well).

    Pretty shortly I am going to go for a ride on my bike. I imagine THAT will clear things up nicely.

    Kisses.

    You're a bit of a cock aren't you?

  • Disappointed fans miss out on Giro d'Italia Belfast team presentation tickets as website crashes1 year 4 weeks agoI got mine after a 3 hour

    I got mine after a 3 hour wait. Just after, news of a separate link came out on social media which let people get tickets within 15 minutes. All very odd.

  • Leave your bike unlocked in Boston & police will lock it up for you1 year 4 weeks agothe bicycle in a red circle

    the bicycle in a red circle "no cycling" road sign is pretty much the same in many countries, the Vienna Convention on Road Signs and Signals attempts to standarise these things (and current UK signage from the 1960s onwards follows this), and a standard prohibitory sign is a black icon on a round white background with a red border.

    Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Ireland, Norway and Sweden appear to be the only European countries that have a diagonal stripe across the 'no cycling' (and other prohibition) signs.

    The issue here is that many road users don't know what standard road signs mean, and given that cyclists don't have compulsory testing on rules of the road, it could be argued that a "no cycling" sign might be contravened more often than others.

  • Apple patents technology to stop texting while driving - but 6 years on, it's still not live1 year 4 weeks ago1. the patent was filed

    1. the patent was filed because Apple is big/fashionable enough to ignore calls from customers and it allows other manufacturers to choose between blaming Apple that they can't implement automatic in-car locking or being on the receiving end of one of Apple's notorious phone patent lawsuits.

    2. the patent is invalid because it's obvious, but it still enables both of the above.

  • FS: Genesis Equilibrium 54 cm £7501 year 4 weeks agoHi, Is this still

    Hi,
    Is this still available?
    Thanks
    Guy