• I may have found a good reason for a bike helmet!1 year 4 weeks agoSimon E wrote:atlaz

    Simon E wrote:
    atlaz wrote:
    French speed limits are really aggressively enforced. One trip down to the Vosges to ride for a weekend I got 3 tickets, all in 110kmph zones... 6, 7 and 9 over the limit.

    There's a speed limit for a reason.

    Too many dickheads think they are much better drivers than they really are.

    Ticketing for such minor infractions is a bit harsh though - less than 10kph (6mph) over the limit - surely encouraging drivers to spend more time looking at speedos and correspondingly less time looking at the road ahead. I'm glad there's the common sense 10%+2mph guideline here in the UK to take account of speedo inaccuracy and to not excessively and disproportionately penalise drivers. I know the French have had pretty shocking road safety stats in the past but this policy of enforcement sounds financially motivated.

    Still, when in Rome and all that.....

  • Love and hate1 year 4 weeks agoLove a good hill, your

    Love a good hill, your description makes me think of Porlock and Dunkery Beacon!

  • Giro-del Trentino Stage 31 year 4 weeks agoTeam for today Dayer Quintana

    Team for today

    Dayer Quintana (MOV)
    Daniel Teklehaimanot (MTQ)
    Omar Fraile (CJR)
    Domenico Pozzovivo (ALM)
    Fabio Andres Duarte (COL)
    Fabio Aru (AST)
    Cadel Evans (BMC)
    Przemyslaw Niemiec (LAM)
    Igor Anton Hernandez (MOV)

  • Replacing rear hanger — will I need an alignment tool?1 year 4 weeks agoA derailleur alignment gauge

    A derailleur alignment gauge is always nice to have, but in this case you should be OK.

    If the frame was not bent during the incident during which the old hanger was damaged, then you should be OK. Just pop in the new hanger and all should be fine. This is the most likely scenario.

    You can also align the hanger by eye. Firstly make sure the hanger is tightly attached. Then hold the derailleur body (not the cage) and use it to bend the hanger until you can see the cage and rear cog are aligned. Obviously this is not ideal.

    Another method is to remove the derailleur, and insert your wheel by screwing the axle end into the hanger. You can now use the wheel as a lever. You then measure the rim distances until they are the same (the wheel is aligned). This will automatically ensure the derailleur (when reattached) is also aligned.

    Or just take it to a shop...

  • Love and hate1 year 4 weeks agoBecause it hurts. And deep

    Because it hurts. And deep down, i think cyclists are slightly (or less slightly in some cases) masochists Laughing

  • Giro Rider Roster (The previously hijacked Giro D'Italia thread)1 year 4 weeks agoVVV73 wrote:northstar wrote:I

    VVV73 wrote:
    northstar wrote:
    I don't blame him or anyone for doing it, i guess they are just riding how they want too, he won the tdf so who am I to knock him.

    He brings a lot of personality to the pro riding world.

    Watching contador / schleck / quintana is far more "entertaining" however.


    LMFAO the schlecks are only entertaining for FALLING OFF. Quintana only been around 24 months max lol.....Conta hasn't done shit since he comeback from doping ban...funny that, no more dancing on the pedals!

    Evans has had a personality bypass.

  • I may have found a good reason for a bike helmet!1 year 4 weeks agoSimon E wrote:atlaz

    Simon E wrote:
    atlaz wrote:
    French speed limits are really aggressively enforced. One trip down to the Vosges to ride for a weekend I got 3 tickets, all in 110kmph zones... 6, 7 and 9 over the limit.

    There's a speed limit for a reason.

    Too many dickheads think they are much better drivers than they really are.

    I went through a speed trap a few years ago and took the offer of a driver awareness course rather than points on my licence. It was really good, a useful refresher after having a car licence since I was 18 and a motorbike licence since I was 24.

    Since then I've been careful to keep my speed down and guess what? I use a lot less fuel and I seem to get where I want to go in the car just as quickly as before. I keep my speed down on the motorbike too (which is a bit harder) and the savings on fuel have been noticeable there as well. The reduction in wear and tear is noticeable as well as the brake linings last longer for both the car and motorbike.

    I still like to drive fast though and I did a track day at Silverstone last year and plan to do one at Brands this year. If you want to drive fast, there are places to do it; either on a race track or the German autobahn network. Anywhere else is plain stupid.

    I don't drive a BMW in case you didn't guess.

  • Mark Cavendish says aero bikes and helmets have reduced his edge over rivals1 year 4 weeks agoI have to say that I think

    I have to say that I think all the points made so far are valid and make sense.

    I think you're all missing a very important point though - if I had Peta Todd at home I wouldn't be putting all my energy into sprinting either.

  • Love and hate1 year 4 weeks ago"Because it's there"...I

    "Because it's there"...I enjoy climbing too, although down here on the south coast there isn't much that sounds as tough as the hill the author climbed. Managed three times up Ditchling the other week and am planning a ride over the weekend to get 4 more of the 100 in the SE region. I ride with guys who aren't as in to it as me, and nearly always they take routes that swerve the hills; I'm going to tell them about how much climbing benefits the rest of your riding.
    I also like running up hills and going up the off road trails on my mtb. MTB is generally harder, the hills are steeper and the devastating effect of losing traction at 1 mph whilst clipped in add another dimension!

  • Love and hate1 year 4 weeks agoPoor grammar.

    Poor grammar. Sick

  • Mark Cavendish says aero bikes and helmets have reduced his edge over rivals1 year 4 weeks agoCav was quick to pick up Aero

    Cav was quick to pick up Aero equipment where others were not which they have now done. Aero equipment also pays dividends over the whole stage meaning the sprinters can arrive 'fresher' at the end. It would have been easier for Cav given his size to hide from the wind during a stage also while the bigger sprinters were at a disadvantage. So now the bigger riders are also saving energy over the stage with the new Aero stuff available.

  • Mark Cavendish says aero bikes and helmets have reduced his edge over rivals1 year 4 weeks agosurely being a pro cyclist of

    surely being a pro cyclist of some merit, Cav knows better than us??
    Just saying

  • The best way to fall off?1 year 4 weeks agoFrom personal experience,

    From personal experience, preparation is key. Rarely will a fall just happen, there is always some build up. Even going into a corner too hot, you should know you are pushing it and be prepared.

    I used to do a fair bit of trampolining and touch wood, this has been very useful for me when it comes to remaining in control during crashes.

    One thing I see a lot is the rabbit in the headlights approach to crash situations. it all starts to go wrong, and the instant reaction is to tense up and wait for death.

    Often a timely dab can save you from a fall, or at least break it a bit (although without fail it'll destroy your cleats and damage your shoes).

    I've always put a hand out when I've gone out, and again, touch wood, never bust a collar bone or shoulder.

    For me its key to try and dissipate kinetic energy as gently as possible, that's why things get broken; the energy asked to be absorbed by the bone is too great. So, when you don't put a hand out, the impact force of whatever hits the ground first will be greater than if you did put your hand out to start that energy absorption earlier.

    However as mentioned, if you put your hand in the wrong position, or are unable to put it down in a way the arm can bend, all the shock is automatically going into quite an exposed chain of bones.

    Its a fascinating subject. My advice would be to start MTB riding (lots of crash practice) and take up trampolining. Have fun.

  • Is it just me or is the classics game really boring?1 year 4 weeks agoTwybaydos wrote:A week of

    Twybaydos wrote:
    A week of Ardennes classics and the week of proper cobbles (e3, GW, RVV, P-R) could have been separate competitions on their own.

    cgipryan wrote:
    I like this idea Applause

    Me too..

  • Love and hate1 year 4 weeks agoIt's a cracker of a climb,

    It's a cracker of a climb, and a nice write up about it, good job sir.
    I sometimes combine it with the Ballengeich Road by the side of Stirling Castle.
    Makes a nice 1hr hilly blast.

  • The best way to fall off?1 year 4 weeks agoUpwards. Or Slowly.

    Upwards.

    Or Slowly.

  • Tour de France Grand Depart hosts slammed for "outrageous" team presentation ticket prices1 year 4 weeks agoNeil753 wrote:In my opinion,

    Neil753 wrote:
    In my opinion, Pandora's Box was opened at Box Hill, where the "market" was tested to see if UK fans would be prepared to pay to stand by the road. And it was packed, wasn't it?

    Organisers probably looked at Box Hill charging, plus the elevated prices for velodrome tickets, and the fact that plenty of riders here are happy to pay rather a lot to ride sportives, and thought that introducing ticketing would be a piece of cake.

    I'm not saying it's a good thing or a bad thing, but it's an inevitable development as our sport becomes more mainstream.

    The cost of sportives - or rather, people willing to pay larger sums to do them - is one that that'd occurred to me.

    However, as someone that went to Box Hill - and I live a handful of miles from there - it it's worth pointing out that the Box Hill tickets were £10 each - a lot less than any other Olympic ticket - and that there was a bunch of security/control required, and big screen/toilet facilities provided, so that felt vaguely reasonable in terms of cost offsetting. The numbers/area control were determined by the National Trust, so a free-for-all by *not* having access control wouldn't have been an option:
    http://positivenews.org.uk/2012/environment/conservation/8108/restoratio...
    (It's possible the NT received some funds for follow-up work, but I've no idea if that was the case)

  • Altura Meta Versa Messenger Bag and Pannier1 year 4 weeks agoJones The Steam wrote:Does

    Jones The Steam wrote:
    Does anyone know of other "messenger bag / pannier" type products?

    I think Vaude do one which has been reviewed on this site? The name escapes me at present.

  • Mark Cavendish says aero bikes and helmets have reduced his edge over rivals1 year 4 weeks agoSummary of slighty longer

    Summary of slighty longer response that I somehow lost before it got posted: bollocks, conjecture unsupported by data, not over that distance, "hyper intelligent" *guffaw*, "lasts longer" *oo err*, bollocks, maybe, hope not. Kittel has a stupid haircut.

  • VO2 Sportswear Team Pie Long Sleeve Cycling Jersey1 year 4 weeks agoThis is a parody shirt and it

    This is a parody shirt and it still costs 60quid. We have all heard the debate about Rapha prices, but when is the parody shirt of this coming out?

  • Mark Cavendish says aero bikes and helmets have reduced his edge over rivals1 year 4 weeks agoI think he is focusing in the

    I think he is focusing in the wrong area. Looking at many of his sprints this year he does seem to be missing his position far too much for the quality of lead out he has.

    Now, there are a few reasons for this.

    1. The lead outs of other teams have got stronger and accordingly, it is harder for Cav to automatically be in a good position to sprint
    2. That after many, many victories, maybe Cav isn't quite so hungry and accordingly, not quite so willing to take the risks he used to to maintain position for sprints
    3. Cav's form may simply not be there yet... he is putting everything on the tour de france and we'll see the best of him there.
    4. That the other teams have woken up to the idea that in a straight fight, Cav is going to win more times than not, so the simple tactic is to ride in a way that ensures Cavs leadout and route to the finish is impeded as much as possible

    Personally I think number 4 makes a lot of sense... if I was a team manager, thats the route I'd be exploring. However I accept that number 4 may simply be an unintentional side effect of number 1.

  • GELS: best/tastiest/most economic1 year 4 weeks agoA lot of people suggesting

    A lot of people suggesting flapjacks from supermarkets which are packed full of fat.

  • Mark Cavendish says aero bikes and helmets have reduced his edge over rivals1 year 4 weeks agoWait, is this the same guy

    Wait, is this the same guy who's been knocking about in one of the specialized aero lids for a few years now???

  • Tour de France Grand Depart hosts slammed for "outrageous" team presentation ticket prices1 year 4 weeks agoIt's hard to know where to

    It's hard to know where to start.

    OK, low hanging fruit first. Did anyone see any of that Roman gladiator style presentation from a couple of years ago? I thought the whole point was to embarass the riders by making them do something stupid. Surely no one goes to these team presentations? Even if they are free?

    Can we all get over that ever so slightly sickening sense of entitlement? Cycling is free to watch because the organisers haven't worked out how to make you pay. Yet. As soon as they can do so - and Flanders Classics, the people who bought the rights to most of the early season races in Flanders, are leading the way in this regard - they will. Do other countries have the same sense of entitlement I wonder? Or is it just us with our (fiscally unsustainable) free at point of delivery NHS and our (postcode lottery, random outcomes) education system who have come to expect that someone (else) should pay for stuff that we consume?

    Also, don't diss wealthy newbies. So what if a some well paid private equity executive kits himself out in new sky kit and buys a sky replica Pinarello with flat pedals. He's doing more for bike shops (and HMRC - all that 20% VAT) than most of the rest of us. We should all be applauding his selflessness. (It's almost always a "he".)

    And finally, just don't go. Don't be outraged at the cost, really, you will miss absolutely nothing if you stay at home. Spend the money you save on something bike related (or better yet, beer), you'll have a far better time (especially if you buy beer).

  • Scottish Road Share campaign steers presumed liability law towards Parliament1 year 4 weeks agoformat- do you have anything

    format- do you have anything to support the statements "most of the costs are incurred by going to court" whilst also saying "most cases dont go to court" ?

    Seems a bit contradictory.

    Once again I support Presumed Liability and your campaining but I also understand the influence insurers have on policy especially at the moment when our goverment wants to been seen as "champions" of the great british motorists and keeping cost down.

    Have you approached the insurers for a view?