• Cyclists’ organisations unite against ‘stay back’ stickers1 year 5 weeks agooozaveared wrote: Please

    oozaveared wrote:

    Please don't equate assertiveness with aggression or bad manners. It is totally the opposite.

    I didn't. I meant aggressive riders. Thanks.

  • Cyclist's crash damages reduced because of 'contributory negligence': looking down at heart rate monitor1 year 5 weeks agoScoob_84 wrote:mtm_01

    Scoob_84 wrote:
    mtm_01 wrote:
    Scoob_84 wrote:
    Out of interest, what level of personal injury did the rider sustain from this incident to warrant the rather large payout?

    A similar incident happened to me yesterday on my morning commute through London. A driver pulled into the cycle/bus lane which I was occupying without indicating or checking the mirrors to see if I was there and took me out. My front wheel and fork now need replacing and I've sustained some soft tissue injury to my wrist and shoulder (backed up by a letter from a doctor).

    I've reported the incident to the police on 101, but have yet to fill out the more comprehensive Road Traffic collision form.

    You should've called the police on the spot - in theory if there's a road traffic accident and someone has been hunt they are obliged to attend the scene.

    Well i guess in the post crash daze i didn't think to do this. Although i went down pretty hard, it wasn't a serious incident where i was trapped under a car or had broken bones sticking out of me.

    When the adrenaline kicks in, its quite hard to know what your supposed to do, especially when it hasn't happened before.

    Don't worry, I did exactly the same when I got knocked off and only found out that fact afterwards. Like you I was bruised but not broken, the driver had stopped and was forthcoming with details so figured I didn't need to get anyone else involved.
    Took 18 months but I did get a decent payout for it.

  • Tour of Oman stage 31 year 5 weeks agoWho's on the scores today?

    Who's on the scores today?

  • Cyclists’ organisations unite against ‘stay back’ stickers1 year 5 weeks agoI've no problem with this on

    I've no problem with this on big trucks. You need to take some responsibility for your own safety, and even assuming an ideal, attentive truck driver it's just not a good idea to go up the inside of big vehicles like that. I don't see anything wrong with reminding people, since a lot of cyclists don't seem to have figured it out yet.

    No need for taxis and vans though.

  • Suspended sentence for lorry driver who killed cyclist and claimed he was unable to avoid hitting him1 year 5 weeks agooozaveared wrote:oldstrath

    oozaveared wrote:
    oldstrath wrote:
    oozaveared wrote:
    Chris James wrote:
    BBB wrote:

    What's actually at fault is the ludicrous law. A more sensible approach would simply say that if you kill someone with a vehicle, that's it, no more driving, no more vehicle.

    Given the current prodriving mindset you may be right, although the mitigation pleas are ludicrous. How do you square 'genuine remorse' with lying to the police? He's simply a lying scummer. Hopefully he'll never be able to afford a car ever again.

    No that would be a ludicrous law. And whether the person has genuine remorese or is a lying scummer is a metter for the court to decide. You know when they see him. speak to him see the whites of his eyes and the cut of his jib, the tone of his voice his body language. You know that stuff. Maybe he's a great actor, maybe the judge (that sees a lot of laying scummers) is a poor judge of all that. But he has to do more than just lie.

    Sorry, can't see why you think it would be ludicrous. At worst, unfair to a small number of unlucky drivers, tiny price for removing murderous clowns like this from the roads.

    As for remorse - if he never drives again and devotes the rest of his life to road safety I'll believe it, otherwise I'd regard it as a con. Another successful one.

  • Volta ao Algarve - Stage 21 year 5 weeks agoQuote:#VoltaAlgarve Bilbao

    Quote:
    #VoltaAlgarve Bilbao has 8" opqs report Tony Martin is dropped.

    The question is, is Martin knackered or saving himself for tomorrow?

  • Suspended sentence for lorry driver who killed cyclist and claimed he was unable to avoid hitting him1 year 5 weeks agooozaveared wrote: What a load

    oozaveared wrote:

    What a load of ignorant tosh.etc

    I wonder which specific bits you found to be most ignorant? I answered your points about charging and sentencing in my third paragraph, so it can't be that.

    My first two paragraphs were in answer to BBB's question as to whether judges were 'soft bleeding heart lefties like many of their colleagues in a public sector?'.

    I didn't 'moan' about sentencing in the riots, I merely pointed out that jailing people for stealing a bottle of water wasn't great evidence of judges being 'soft bleeding heart lefties'.

    Is that the bit you disagree with?

  • Boris Johnson’s bike destroyed - by a pothole1 year 5 weeks agoIf there is a lesson to not

    If there is a lesson to not believe anything you read, this is it.

  • Cyclists’ organisations unite against ‘stay back’ stickers1 year 5 weeks agoThey could try stickers on

    They could try stickers on the inside of windscreens something along the lines of

    "Drivers, it's actually the law that you use your indicators...you know that stick on the left of your steering wheel, it goes DOWN for left..try using it...not all road users can read your mind!"

  • Cyclists’ organisations unite against ‘stay back’ stickers1 year 5 weeks agoThe ctc forum is over there

    The ctc forum is over there >>>>>

  • Cyclists’ organisations unite against ‘stay back’ stickers1 year 5 weeks agomooleur wrote:mrmo

    mooleur wrote:
    mrmo wrote:
    mooleur wrote:
    . Between now and July last year male deaths on Londons roads were almost 50% higher than female. Going off the stats on ctc's sites, it looks like there was around 9 men and 4 women killed in London.

    Bit of a harsh statement on a very sensitive subject, tbh.

    Now revise those numbers to reflect the percentage cyclists who are male and who are female.

    That is what I meant, there is something very odd when the numbers are as out of kilter as they are.

    I know it is a sensitive topic, and I am not trying to be insensitive on this.

    quick google brings this back

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8296971.stm

    That's fair enough, although it's a harsh reality that whilst women do tend to cycle more "safely" they bear the brunt of being the more damaged demographic.

    Ok let's not mix up our terms here. Riding safely equates with riding assertively. Assertively means being visible, decisive and communicative. Riding out in the road either primary or secondary. outside the door zones. Holding your position. Holding your lane if you take it. Planning and beginning manouevers early. Making sure that if possible the look over your shoulder is a complete look. That you are seen to be looking as well as actually looking. If possible making eye contact with the driver of the vehicle behind. Then
    big gestures to create visible signals that mean "I am going in that space". I am not asking your permission. I am telling you what I am doing. ie every one can see you and knows exactly what you are going to do next. It doesn't stop the areseholes getting a cob on but anyone running you down is definitely doing it on purpose not because they didn't see you.

    I see a lot of timid riders and when I am driving they are the worry. I see them because I am tuned in to looking out for cyclists. Otherwise you might miss them. But they're the ones probably not where they should be because they don't want to get in the lane to turn right too early. Limp hand signals followed by indecisive move across lane on the basis of "if you'll let me" and probably way too late in the day to have any control over their own space.

    This second style is not safer. It is less safe.

    Please don't equate assertiveness with aggression or bad manners. It is totally the opposite. Being assertive is taking your rightful place on the road with confidence and skill and using space, time, position and communication to influence other road users. I am also an advanced driver. The IAM base their test and training on the police driving and motorcycling manual/philosophy called "Roadcraft". For a cycling specific version based on the same Roadcraft philosophy try John Franklin - "How to be a better cyclist".

    "The aim is to highlight a cyclist’s right to ‘claim their lane’ and, where safe and appropriate, to assert themselves [by] pushing out further into the lane and making themselves visible to drivers," said Pickering. “Mastering a more assertive and informed style of cycling is definitely something we believe keeps cyclists and motorists safer on our roads.”

    Buy it, read it.

  • Tour of Oman stage 31 year 5 weeks agohmm i did mention it was not

    hmm i did mention it was not a steep climb, 1,3,4,16,19 + 5 for Griepel,
    1,2,5 gc + 1,2,3,5 points and 1,3 youth. Not a bad i think.

  • Colnago CX Zero Disc road bike1 year 5 weeks agoCXR94Di2 wrote:A lot of money

    CXR94Di2 wrote:
    A lot of money for mechanical discs brakes and mechanical shifters. Boardman do Di2 and hydraulic brakes for less, and it looks nicer Smile

    For a moment I though you were serious! Good joke that.

  • FS – Hewitt Carbon Alpine Frame and Forks. – Piccies1 year 5 weeks agoWhat height of rider would

    What height of rider would this suit?

  • Volta ao Algarve - Stage 21 year 5 weeks agoCat 3 KOM Pereira 3,Silva

    Cat 3 KOM

    Pereira 3,Silva 2,Pineau 1 fantasy point

  • Cyclists’ organisations unite against ‘stay back’ stickers1 year 5 weeks agoAre there any more bandwagons

    Are there any more bandwagons for them?

  • Cyclist's crash damages reduced because of 'contributory negligence': looking down at heart rate monitor1 year 5 weeks agoMore bullshit.

    More bullshit.

  • Marks & Spencer launches cycling chinos1 year 5 weeks agoNicely twinned with

    Nicely twinned with orthopaedic shoes for that definitive 'no exercise in 20 years' look!

  • single speed1 year 5 weeks agoBullhorns - I would say go

    Bullhorns - I would say go for it, provided:

    1. You like the look of them (definitely important to like the look of your steed)
    2. You are comfortable with the feel of them (suggest you go and sit on a bike that has them on)
    3. The brakes are positioned near where you will usually put your hands (if you are going to have to move your hands and scrabble around to find the brakes in an emergency they will not be ideal).

    I rode bullhorns just for fun while commuting for many years. I had my brakes mounted so that they were on the horns (rather than stuck right by the stem), so it was effectively like I was riding on the hoods of a regular drop bar (except for the fact that the bars were seriously low because the frame was small and I had a mega-long seat post to compensate - I guess it was a bit like riding a lo-pro)

    I haven't done so in 3-4 years, because I bought and built a load of new bikes, so have not ridden that bike in a while. Every now and again I think about switching the bullhorns to one of the other bikes, but never quite got round to it.

    Singlespeed: go for it.

  • Cyclists’ organisations unite against ‘stay back’ stickers1 year 5 weeks agoBig deal over a sign, it is

    Big deal over a sign, it is obvious what it means but the new ones do look good.

  • Cyclists’ organisations unite against ‘stay back’ stickers1 year 5 weeks agoIf last night's dreadful

    If last night's dreadful behaviour on Finchley Road is anything to go by, I really need a sticker on the back of my bike which says:

    "Taxi drivers, stay back. If you see me riding in the middle of a bus lane, this is not an invitation for you to try and undertake me at speed and then give me verbal abuse when I change position to prevent you from doing so."

    Does anyone know why taxi drivers are allowed to use bus lanes anyway? Taxis aren't classed as essential public transport are they?

  • Potential route changes see Froome rule out Milan-San Remo - but Cavendish may now ride1 year 5 weeks agoInteresting news, and a great

    Interesting news, and a great reminder that the season is almost upon us. Bring it on! Applause

  • For Sale: Charge Mixer Alfine 81 year 5 weeks agoForgot to mention that I'm in

    Forgot to mention that I'm in South West London, near Kingston Upon Thames.

  • Cyclists’ organisations unite against ‘stay back’ stickers1 year 5 weeks agoMattT53 wrote:Yes it might be

    MattT53 wrote:
    Yes it might be a bit abrupt, but if it saves lives surely it's worth it. At the end of the day, not being your fault is little compensation if you do get hit ....

    On reflection though, its not only 'abrupt' (to the point of hostile) but its not actually very clear or specific enough. The suggested image in the article seems much more to-the-point.

  • Chris Boardman: "Helmets not even in top 10 of things that keep cycling safe"1 year 5 weeks agoFrom an article in the New

    From an article in the New York Times.

    "A Bicycling Mystery"

    "Millions of parents take it as an article of faith that putting a bicycle helmet on their children, or themselves, will help keep them out of harm's way.

    "But new data on bicycle accidents raises questions about that. The number of head injuries has increased 10 percent since 1991, even as bicycle helmet use has risen sharply, according to figures compiled by the Consumer Product Safety Commission. But given that ridership has declined over the same period, the rate of head injuries per active cyclist has increased 51 percent just as bicycle helmets have become widespread.

    "Still, with fewer people riding bicycles, experts are mystified as to why injuries are on the rise. ''It's puzzling to me that we can't find the benefit of bike helmets here,'' said Ronald L. Medford, the assistant executive director of the safety commission's hazard identification office.

    More interesting stuff in the article.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2001/07/29/business/a-bicycling-mystery-head-inju...