• "Sick" David Millar unhappy at being cut from Garmin-Sharp's Tour de France line-up1 year 4 weeks agoWhat about the forgotten man

    What about the forgotten man of British cycling, Steve Cummings? He hasn't been selected either. Is he injured?

    Surprised at Simon Yates' inclusion. I assumed he was too young. And Orica select Simon why not Adam too?

  • Councillor calls for work to be stopped on 'dangerous' £300,000 Sustrans cycle route until junction priority sorted1 year 4 weeks agoI'm a bit late responding to

    I'm a bit late responding to this as have only just realised the story was picked up by road.cc

    The situation here is that the greenway style track crosses two roads. One of these is a pure residential street, not a culdesac but close enough, what the Dutch would call an "access road". The second is a 30mph road that distributes motor traffic around a large housing estate and carries buses, what the Dutch would call an "estate distributor road".

    Hopefully most would accept that the two are different types of road and one would expect a cycle track to interact differently with them.

    When the scheme is finished there should be clear differences in appearance between the two. In neither case is guardrail a suitable solution.

  • Half of Britons say local roads too dangerous for cycling in BBC poll1 year 4 weeks agoRE showers and cycle

    RE showers and cycle commuting - I must be doing it wrong then as after just ten - twelve miles on the way in (depending on the route I choose), I have quite a sweat on!

    It's probably do-able without a shower and just an 'armpit scrub' but definitely not ideal..

    to the people who suggest there's no need to shower unless you're doing 100 miles... Well, perhaps your route is pan flat and full of traffic lights? Mine is practically a hilly time trial. Ok it perhaps doesn't need to be quite so fast but taking time over the journey kind of defeats the object as a viable alternative to driving..

  • Half of Britons say local roads too dangerous for cycling in BBC poll1 year 4 weeks agoparksey wrote:Oh, and can I

    parksey wrote:
    Oh, and can I propose we invoke a new version of Godwin's Law on here that, whenever there is an article about cycling infrastructure, the sodding Netherlands gets mentioned...?

    Is it really such a bad idea to refer to the most successful example for ideas and inspiration?

    You learn to fly by studying birds, not bricks.

  • Half of Britons say local roads too dangerous for cycling in BBC poll1 year 4 weeks agoSomeone should collect all

    Someone should collect all these negative polls and shove them where monkeys shove their nuts, I'm 76 and enjoyed donkeys years of cycling, and still do. There is more danger in car orientated mode of transport, cycling is a healthy pastime, a healthy sport, push the positive and stuff the negative.

  • Narrower tyres improving speed!1 year 4 weeks agoThat's a good point a 23mm

    That's a good point a 23mm 4000s will I'd bet be faster than a no name brand 25-28mm. Then as you say you throw in a gatorskin type commuting minimise punctures tyre vs a race type tyre and the choice is more complex again.

  • Improve performance/speed how1 year 4 weeks agoIf you want to be serious

    If you want to be serious about it, start by analyzing the lap record, understand what speed you need to be doing at each part of the lap and see how you compare.

    This will highlight if there are any immediate areas to address...

    Then its a case of developing the power you can produce for 15-20 minutes, whilst at the same time lowering the amount of power required to achieve the speed necessary.

    The former is dong through structured training, the latter is done through improving aerodynamics, dropping weight, improving mechanical efficiencies.

    An example of this was a couple of years back... I was able to drop 300grams of rotational weight from pedals and shoes. At same time, this enabled me to drop me pedal stack height, which in turn meant I could lower my saddle (lowering my overall frontal area) and actually get my position on a smaller frame, dropping further weight.

    An old school way of improving speed is to start doing intervals at the average speed required to get the lap record... ride at that speed until you pop, recover with easy riding for 2-3 mins, then go again.

    If you do it on the actual lap, you may start by being able to do 4x 2mins at the desired speed per lap... then you can start to extend interval length and shorten rest period, adn before you know you are getting close to the record.

    Good luck with it.

  • Witness appeal after Wiltshire cyclist killed in collision with lorry1 year 4 weeks agooldstrath wrote:oozaveared

    oldstrath wrote:
    oozaveared wrote:
    kie7077 wrote:

    struck by an overtaking lorry

    Angry

    I hope the driver gets prison. You either do a safe overtake or you don't, a safe overtake doesn't result in someone dieing.

    I don't know the facts here. I don't know the road, I don't know if any other vehicles were involved in any way or what the lorry was overtaking at what speed or where the cyclists were immediately before and then during the incident whether they were on the road already or came on to the road during, or were crossing the road.

    Do you think maybe we ought to find out exactly what happened before we send anyone to jail or is that just a bit old fashioned?

    ‘No, no!’ said the Queen. ‘Sentence first — verdict afterwards.’
    ‘Stuff and nonsense!’ said Alice loudly. ‘The idea of having the sentence first!’
    ‘Hold your tongue!’ said the Queen, turning purple.
    ‘I won’t!’ said Alice.
    ‘Off with her head!’ the Queen shouted at the top of her voice. Nobody moved.
    ‘Who cares for you?’ said Alice, (she had grown to her full size by this time.) ‘You’re nothing but a pack of cards!’

    Unfortunately we know fine what will happen. The police will find some version of the truth, the CPS will go for a minimal charge, and the judge will let him off with a mildly tapped wrist.

    Surely better would be to recognise that driving is a privilege, and say that if you kill someone with a motor vehicle then, unless you can unequivocally prove your lack of fault you lose that privilege; then deal with the issue of punishment separately.

    I couldn't agree more. I believe that the enforcement of driving standards is lax, that the CPS and the police don't take dangerous driving seriously enough, that the CPS often pursues the easier charge of of Careless when they should be pursuing a dangerous charge, that the sentences are way too low and that much extended driving bans are necessary.

    But you still have to have the facts before making judgements.

  • Cambridge Waitrose in trouble for describing Tour de France as "local sporting event"1 year 4 weeks agoA much more balanced view

    A much more balanced view than Harrogate neighbourhood watch.....

  • Witness appeal after Wiltshire cyclist killed in collision with lorry1 year 4 weeks ago.

    .

  • Witness appeal after Wiltshire cyclist killed in collision with lorry1 year 4 weeks agoAirzound wrote:oozaveared

    Airzound wrote:
    oozaveared wrote:
    kie7077 wrote:

    struck by an overtaking lorry

    Angry

    I hope the driver gets prison. You either do a safe overtake or you don't, a safe overtake doesn't result in someone dieing.

    I don't know the facts here. I don't know the road, I don't know if any other vehicles were involved in any way or what the lorry was overtaking at what speed or where the cyclists were immediately before and then during the incident whether they were on the road already or came on to the road during, or were crossing the road.

    Do you think maybe we ought to find out exactly what happened before we send anyone to jail or is that just a bit old fashioned?

    Do you really think that kie was suggesting otherwise?

    He was merely articulating what I suspect that many of us feel absolute disbelief that a cyclist was killed by a lorry which was allegedly over taking and the cyclist died as a result. Kie was merely expressing a hope that the driver receives a prison sentence which tbh is perfectly reasonable if found guilty of a serious driving offence which has resulted in some one being killed.

    We don't need your rant suggesting or assuming that Kie meant we dispense with the judicial process and just throw the driver in prison!

    "Do you really think that kie was suggesting otherwise?"

    Well that's what he did suggest. No caveats or ifs or buts about it. It was so blatent and clear it exactly reminded me of the Alice in Wonderland quote about sentence first verdict afterwards.

    "Kie was merely expressing a hope that the driver receives a prison sentence which tbh is perfectly reasonable if found guilty of a serious driving offence which has resulted in some one being killed."

    Yep and the small but important word there is "IF".

    I just read what people write. If they mean something else by it and you two are both using "the force" to deduce meaning then I am unfortunately embarassed in that department so I am left only with the words.

    As a suggestion, because I may not be alone in being un-connected with "the force" that you guys are using, would it be a good idea you think if when people had caveats they just wrote them down in their post. That would make it easier on the rest of us not using ESP.

  • Cyclist urges Surrey County Council to repair road defect “before someone gets killed”1 year 4 weeks agoOn Lea Bridge Road in

    On Lea Bridge Road in Leytonstone there's a ridge at least 10 cm high running lengthways along the road in the bus lane for a few metres. It's absolutely lethal.

  • Narrower tyres improving speed!1 year 4 weeks agoI think the speed increase

    I think the speed increase you saw in moving from a 32mm Marathon Plus to a 25mm Durano was due to the type of tyre, not the size. The Durano is simply lighter and grippier.

    A lot of riders use a particular tyre for Winter or commuting which will see a bigger speed drop even though it's the same size as their regular set.

  • Half of Britons say local roads too dangerous for cycling in BBC poll1 year 4 weeks agoparksey wrote:broomie

    parksey wrote:
    broomie wrote:
    Cycling to work takes some planning simple tips are:

    1, Keep a lock At work dont ride around with it -saes alot of weight

    2. Keep your clothes at work just swap in and oput shirts/blouses etc when you need them- I see so many folks with huge backpacks where they take their enture wardrobe to work everday,

    3. Squaddie wash In the gents/ladies a scrub under the offending armpits is the most you need unless seriously you have done 100 miles/

    4. Deoderant!

    Broomie

    Can only echo this comment myself. I only travel a few miles each way, but still use a hill on the way in for a bit of interval training, and there's absolutely no need for me to shower when I get to work.

    I simply shower before I leave, then when I get to work I nip in a cubicle and have a rub down with a few baby wipes and a squirt of deodorant and, most importantly, a complete change of clothes, and job done. All-in it's about 5 minutes, and I can honestly say I don't feel any less "fresh" than had I just got straight out the shower. No complaints yet as to my personal hygiene either, even on the warmest of summer days...

    Work shoes, trousers, ties etc are all kept at work, and I just roll up a freshly-ironed shirt every morning and it goes in my bag, to emerge unscathed at the other end (ok, "non-iron" shirts help with this). A world away from that creased-shirt look you get when you've been sat in the same position in a car seat for an hour.

    Ok, I acknowledge that things might not be so simple if the journey was 30/40/50 miles, but how many people would ever commute that sort of distance on a bike?!

    And I think that's part of the problem. Not so much that employers don't have the facilities for cyclists, rather that people choose to live too bloody far from where they work as to make cycling viable. A quick straw poll in my office shows the average distance amongst a dozen or so of us to be over 25 miles, and that includes the 3 or 4 of us who live within 5 miles and do cycle.

    I don't want to say that nobody should be allowed to work outside of a 10 mile radius of their home postcode or some such nonsense, but equally, all the while it is considered socially acceptable to do a 100 mile round commute every day, you won't be getting those people on bikes for utility purposes.

    I know what you mean, but ultimately, the ability to earn a living and pay the bills has to come way higher up the list than my preference of transport. I consider my current 16-mile round trip to be a rare luxury. I hated my 120 mile round trip years ago. Hated it. But the job market was poor. I certainly couldn't afford to turn it down.

  • "Sick" David Millar unhappy at being cut from Garmin-Sharp's Tour de France line-up1 year 4 weeks agoNo, their jobs don't rely on

    No, their jobs don't rely on results, they rely on sponsorship: prize money income is a small fraction of sponsorship income.

    And sponsorship is not solely served by having the best podium placings, otherwise no French business would sponsor a team, and T-Mobile would have kept up with their sponsorship even when all the doping stuff was going on ("hey, they're still getting the results, right?").

    It's important, but it's not the sole criterion.

  • Half of Britons say local roads too dangerous for cycling in BBC poll1 year 4 weeks agoOh, and can I propose we

    Oh, and can I propose we invoke a new version of Godwin's Law on here that, whenever there is an article about cycling infrastructure, the sodding Netherlands gets mentioned...?

  • Half of Britons say local roads too dangerous for cycling in BBC poll1 year 4 weeks agobikebot wrote:Simmo72

    bikebot wrote:
    Simmo72 wrote:
    GrahamSt wrote:
    Leodis wrote:
    People use to say to me use wet wipes, yeah great you feel really fresh after standing nude in the work toilets with a pack of baby wipes, someone walks in and its P45 time...

    Use a cubicle you weirdo!

    I just rub myself vigorously against my boss's coat.

    Do you wait for him to take it off?

    Where would the fun be in that? Cycling to work is supposed to be 'invigorating', after all.

  • Half of Britons say local roads too dangerous for cycling in BBC poll1 year 4 weeks agobroomie wrote:Cycling to work

    broomie wrote:
    Cycling to work takes some planning simple tips are:

    1, Keep a lock At work dont ride around with it -saes alot of weight

    2. Keep your clothes at work just swap in and oput shirts/blouses etc when you need them- I see so many folks with huge backpacks where they take their enture wardrobe to work everday,

    3. Squaddie wash In the gents/ladies a scrub under the offending armpits is the most you need unless seriously you have done 100 miles/

    4. Deoderant!

    Broomie

    Can only echo this comment myself. I only travel a few miles each way, but still use a hill on the way in for a bit of interval training, and there's absolutely no need for me to shower when I get to work.

    I simply shower before I leave, then when I get to work I nip in a cubicle and have a rub down with a few baby wipes and a squirt of deodorant and, most importantly, a complete change of clothes, and job done. All-in it's about 5 minutes, and I can honestly say I don't feel any less "fresh" than had I just got straight out the shower. No complaints yet as to my personal hygiene either, even on the warmest of summer days...

    Work shoes, trousers, ties etc are all kept at work, and I just roll up a freshly-ironed shirt every morning and it goes in my bag, to emerge unscathed at the other end (ok, "non-iron" shirts help with this). A world away from that creased-shirt look you get when you've been sat in the same position in a car seat for an hour.

    Ok, I acknowledge that things might not be so simple if the journey was 30/40/50 miles, but how many people would ever commute that sort of distance on a bike?!

    And I think that's part of the problem. Not so much that employers don't have the facilities for cyclists, rather that people choose to live too bloody far from where they work as to make cycling viable. A quick straw poll in my office shows the average distance amongst a dozen or so of us to be over 25 miles, and that includes the 3 or 4 of us who live within 5 miles and do cycle.

    I don't want to say that nobody should be allowed to work outside of a 10 mile radius of their home postcode or some such nonsense, but equally, all the while it is considered socially acceptable to do a 100 mile round commute every day, you won't be getting those people on bikes for utility purposes.

  • Half of Britons say local roads too dangerous for cycling in BBC poll1 year 4 weeks agoSimmo72 wrote:GrahamSt

    Simmo72 wrote:
    GrahamSt wrote:
    Leodis wrote:
    People use to say to me use wet wipes, yeah great you feel really fresh after standing nude in the work toilets with a pack of baby wipes, someone walks in and its P45 time...

    Use a cubicle you weirdo!

    I just rub myself vigorously against my boss's coat.

    Do you wait for him to take it off?

  • Half of Britons say local roads too dangerous for cycling in BBC poll1 year 4 weeks agoNo shower at work? Use

    No shower at work? Use Muc-off dry shower, surprisingly effective.

    And then, if your workplace has more than one or two people cycling more than 10km a day, complain about the lack of showers! The Dutch don't need them for two simple reasons, their commutes are usually short and they don't have any hills.

  • Going batty!1 year 4 weeks agoStill not sure who the Oakley

    Still not sure who the Oakley suppliers were. However, I notice you're in Bolton. I'm just down in South Manchester if you want to check out the tinted or clear Bolles I have. PM me if interested.

  • Bargain GPS watch headlines latest Aldi cycling offers1 year 4 weeks agoWell the Runtastic connect

    Well the Runtastic connect app sees there is a watch there but says "invalid watch connected" so I guess the Aldi one is just missing a line of code in the connection process that says "hello I am a Runtastic watch serial number XXXXXX".
    Slight problem installing the GPSMaster software on my Mac as for some reason it installs with permissions set so no one can access the folder containing the application, not very useful! Easy enough to fix once I'd worked out what was happening (right click the folder and select 'get info' unlock the get info panel by clicking the padlock icon at the bottom and entering your admin ID and password then change the no one to everyone RW) but a little sloppy of Aldi's developers!
    GPS Master is a bit old fashioned looking but downloads the data fine and exports gpx files so dead easy to read the data into whatever website or software you like best.

  • Half of Britons say local roads too dangerous for cycling in BBC poll1 year 4 weeks agoOur parents and grandparents

    Our parents and grandparents got along fien without a shower.

    I see lots of excuses genuine and invented.

    The roads are dangerous, unseen hazards, aggressive and thoughtless drivers (and door passengers!) - i have commuted in London for 40 years - I know.

    Cycling to work takes some planning simple tips are:

    1, Keep a lock At work dont ride around with it -saes alot of weight

    2. Keep your clothes at work just swap in and oput shirts/blouses etc when you need them- I see so many folks with huge backpacks where they take their enture wardrobe to work everday,

    3. Squaddie wash In the gents/ladies a scrub under the offending armpits is the most you need unless seriously you have done 100 miles/

    4. Deoderant!

    Broomie

  • Ridley go retro for the Tour de France1 year 4 weeks agoI think it is just the

    I think it is just the contrasting panels that make it 'retro'. Maybe the solid colours?

    I don't see how this limits the colours available though. I think a general sheep mentality and lack of imagination seems to be limiting everyone to red and black.

  • Narrower tyres improving speed!1 year 4 weeks agoWhen people say "wider tyres

    When people say "wider tyres are faster" they assume the current tyre is less than 25mm width. What should be said is something like "for riding on britsh roads, 25-28mm tyres at the correct pressures are probably fastest."