• Cycle hire hub plans revealed in Plymouth1 year 5 weeks agoBetter placed for the hire

    Better placed for the hire point would be the Barbican..

  • Boardman launch 2014 Elite Series1 year 5 weeks agorockfield wrote:bikes look

    rockfield wrote:
    bikes look really good in terms of design & spec, but i just cant get past that massive logo on the downtube. Why does there have to be so much writing all over them? Must be quite an easy life being the guy in charge of colours & logos for boardman bikes!!

    I totally agree, but to be fair i don't think they're any different to any of the major brands in that respect, Trek, Cannondale, Giant, Specialized etc. etc. they're all guilty of over logoing.

  • Commute Bag1 year 5 weeks agoHas anybody used one of the

    Has anybody used one of the Henty Wingman suit carriers? I like the concept but they look a bit unstable. And enormous.

  • Campaigners criticise "self-fulfilling prophecy" as Department for Transport predicts decline in cycling1 year 5 weeks agoWhere the f**k are these 40%

    Where the f**k are these 40% extra cars going to drive, the roads are full already. TFL seems not to have noticed that car ownership is already dropping in London due to the overall pain that is driving and parking in London.

  • Cycle hire hub plans revealed in Plymouth1 year 5 weeks agoGuyz2010 wrote:Good idea for

    Guyz2010 wrote:
    Good idea for Plymouth but will it work. the Royal William Yard is a bit out on a limb and more of place you would cycle to rather than from.

    Exactly and with such limited parking at the RWY riding to it makes a lot more sense than riding from it.

  • Cycle hire hub plans revealed in Plymouth1 year 5 weeks agoGood idea for Plymouth but

    Good idea for Plymouth but will it work. the Royal William Yard is a bit out on a limb and more of place you would cycle to rather than from.
    I would hope someone of sense would identify the cycle networks and locations for tourists. Plymouth has a wealth of interesting areas widespread to visit.
    The lets not talk about the poor condition of the roads and the 60% of the road gullies being blocked causing massive rivers down the side of the roads. Years of neglect by the highways maintenance company Amey....and PCC

  • Wiggle rides into Twitter storm over 'make helmets compulsory' blog1 year 5 weeks ago700c wrote:I think there's

    700c wrote:
    I think there's more to be done by manufacturers and government to test helmets to higher standards and to require higher standards to be met in the first place. It's quite possible this could account for varying reports on their effectiveness.

    Testing to and meeting higher standards would simply make helmets hot and heavy. It's been tried. The first British Standard for helmets had a penetration requirement that was impossible to meet without using a hard outer shell and small vents. BS helmets didn't sell very well, as a result.

    If I were being snarky, I'd say that this is therefore a great idea, as less comfy, heavier helmets would help to make more people opposed to compulsion.

    700c wrote:
    I am surprised the manufacturers are still in business and have not been sued for millions!

    If you look at helmet marketing materials, they're typically very careful not to actually make any claims about the product's effectiveness, but rather to list so many circumstances in which the helmet won't protect you that you really do start to wonder if they have any faith in their products at all.

    From one of Bell's motorbike helmet manuals:

    Quote:
    Your Bell Star is designed to reduce or prevent certain injuries, and studies show you are better off in an accident if you are wearing a helmet than if you are not. Regardless, a motorcycle helmet cannot protect against all foreseeable impacts or injuries. For example, your helmet cannot protect against spinal injuries, neck injuries, or any portion of the body it does not cover. In addition, it may not protect against injuries to areas the helmet does cover. For example, your helmet is made of energy absorbing materials which may or may not crush depending upon the impact. Sometimes the force of the impact is such that there is no crush, and sometimes the force of the impact is such that the material crushes completely, in either case at least some of the force of the impact is transmitted to the head and brain, and permanent injury or death may result.

    In addition, some head injuries are not caused by impacts. They are caused by other forces, like scrambling an egg just by shaking it. You do not have to destroy the shell to destroy the contents. Helmets cannot prevent this type of injury. Because of the wide variety of accident scenarios, it is impossible to tell when your helmet will or will not protect against injury or death.

  • Campaigners criticise "self-fulfilling prophecy" as Department for Transport predicts decline in cycling1 year 5 weeks agoSurprising, considering the

    Surprising, considering the predicted 10m growth in population, nearly all of which will be in the South East, mostly in and around London. The work these people will be doing, if any, will be low paid. They won't be affording cars. And they'll be coming from countries far more used to using bikes as utility vehicles.

    So basically, I'm saying that 10m potential cycling commuters are arriving in the next 10 years. There will be bikes everywhere.

  • Wiggle rides into Twitter storm over 'make helmets compulsory' blog1 year 5 weeks ago@700C Helmet manufacturers

    @700C

    Helmet manufacturers have never claimed that their helmets reduce serious head injuries. Never. In fact, if you read the label inside your new Snell-B90 tested helmet you'll probably see a statement to the contrary.

    Good luck sueing anyone when there's basically no evidence that helmets do anything besides take money out of the pocket of the gullible. Has anyone been sued for selling homeopathic medicine in the UK?

    Helmets: homeopathy for the head

  • Rapha launch new training and racing collection1 year 5 weeks agoHas anyone else look at the

    Has anyone else look at the Country winter hat page on the Rapha site (http://www.rapha.cc/country-winter-hat/) and though 'they are ALL wearing them back to front'? Or is it just me?

  • Mile End death cyclist named; another critical after coach crash1 year 5 weeks agoguyonabike wrote:kie7077

    guyonabike wrote:
    kie7077 wrote:
    Normally education is the schools job, it looks to me like they are failing their pupils by not teaching them Road safety, Do they even do the green cross code these days?

    Last time I checked, road safety was one for the parents...


    True, but most people are 'discovering' cycling in adulthood. When my mother asked me if I wore a helmet I just laughed (because I do, natch). How to educate adults... that's a mystery.

  • Mile End death cyclist named; another critical after coach crash1 year 5 weeks agokie7077 wrote: Normally

    kie7077 wrote:
    Normally education is the schools job, it looks to me like they are failing their pupils by not teaching them Road safety, Do they even do the green cross code these days?

    Last time I checked, road safety was one for the parents...

  • Free lights for kids as Dorset & Cambridge police tackle unlit cycling1 year 5 weeks agoWhy does nobody say or do

    Why does nobody say or do anything until AFTER the clocks go back?

    Surely prevention is better than cure.

  • Study finds paracetamol helps cyclists' endurance - but health and ethical questions arise1 year 5 weeks agoNext up: Shock as new study

    Next up: Shock as new study finds cyclists now using jenkem to increase performance.

  • Boardman launch 2014 Elite Series1 year 5 weeks agokitkat, from memory, I think

    kitkat, from memory, I think that it does remain external, yes. I can't do it this second but I'll upload Boardman's own catalogue-style shots later that should show the arrangement (edit: they're up now).

    And, yes, comparing the 2013 AiR TT and the 2014 one: that's on my 'to do' list too (edit: but Chris Boardman himself tells you below... so that's a win!).

  • Campaigners criticise "self-fulfilling prophecy" as Department for Transport predicts decline in cycling1 year 5 weeks agoNeil753 wrote: I suspect the

    Neil753 wrote:

    I suspect the loss of fuel duty revenue will be a tough one to crack. My opinion is that it will be replaced by road pricing. All new cars could be fitted with a "black box", and compulsory retro-fitting at the next MOT test would take care of the rest. From there, it would be easy to legislate for telemetrics based insurance, linking poor driver behaviour directly with higher premiums.

    But whatever the future holds, bicycles will play a key part in our transition to a low carbon economy.


    I mostly agree, but it won't be by compulsory black box fitting to existing cars. It will be by EU legislation making black boxes mandatory for all new cars sold in the EU, therefore washing it in over a decade or so.

  • Wiggle rides into Twitter storm over 'make helmets compulsory' blog1 year 5 weeks agoI think there's more to be

    I think there's more to be done by manufacturers and government to test helmets to higher standards and to require higher standards to be met in the first place. It's quite possible this could account for varying reports on their effectiveness.

    The empirical facts quoted by @Ush, above, are only useful in the helmet debate if you can demonstrate cause and effect (comparing across different populations etc introduces a lot of variables), so conducting real life tests in identical conditions, some with helmets, some without, would do it, however that would be illegal, so perhaps crash test dummies would be a start...

    Again, everyone is free to choose, but I'd rather not take a decision about wearing a helmet based on uncertainty of their level of protection - I would still say better safe than sorry, but that's just me

    As for suggesting their action as a lever on the spine outweighs any benefit in reducing direct impact on the head - well I am surprised the manufacturers are still in business and have not been sued for millions! I don't think this is the reality, but again, we lack proper tests to prove this, don't we?

  • Campaigners criticise "self-fulfilling prophecy" as Department for Transport predicts decline in cycling1 year 5 weeks agofarrell wrote:Neil753

    farrell wrote:
    Neil753 wrote:
    If they had "consulted" me, as an HGV driver

    You know, I've never been "consulted" on anything. I don't recall anybody I know ever being "consulted" either.

    So just who the hell are they "consulting"?

    You find most consultations are usually listed on Government/Council web sites. If you don't go to the web site on purpose or subscribe to their feed, then you most likely wouldn't know they were consulting.

  • Edinburgh snub pothole repairs for more cycle paths1 year 5 weeks agoFair enough to complain

    Fair enough to complain really, how far can £1m be realistically expected to go towards cycle paths in a city the size of Edinburgh?

  • Campaigners criticise "self-fulfilling prophecy" as Department for Transport predicts decline in cycling1 year 5 weeks agoNeil753 wrote:If they had

    Neil753 wrote:
    If they had "consulted" me, as an HGV driver

    You know, I've never been "consulted" on anything. I don't recall anybody I know ever being "consulted" either.

    So just who the hell are they "consulting"?

  • Campaigners criticise "self-fulfilling prophecy" as Department for Transport predicts decline in cycling1 year 5 weeks agoSanderville wrote:How much

    Sanderville wrote:
    How much money does the cycling lobby have compared with the road lobby?

    What does cash make? Government policy.


    You've hit the nail on the head. The thing is, without predictions of traffic growth, the government would be not be able to award lucrative contracts to their mates, for road construction projects. This is how it works. It's a murky world but the mere fact that "consultancy fees" for widening the M25 were in excess of 100 million alone, gives some clue to the amount of public money being syphoned off to ex school chums.

    If they had "consulted" me, as an HGV driver, I would have told them that traffic round the M25 was actually falling, so widening the motorway would be a waste of taxpayers cash. And my "consultation" would have been free.

  • Wiggle rides into Twitter storm over 'make helmets compulsory' blog1 year 5 weeks agoI wear 1 now and it isnt the

    I wear 1 now and it isnt the law. I will wear 1 if it becomes the law and I couldnt give a monkies either way. I wear my lid because I feel it adds some form of protection if I am unlucky enough to crash.

    End of

  • Wiggle rides into Twitter storm over 'make helmets compulsory' blog1 year 5 weeks ago700c wrote: logically a

    700c wrote:

    logically a helmet must provide a measure of protection against impact, considering for a moment the physics, independent of external factors such as driver behaviour.

    Logically: a helmet provides a longer lever on the head and spinal column.

    Empirically: no reduction in serious head injuries are recorded in helmet. wearing populations.

    Empirically: helmet wearing populations have lower levels of cycling.

    Empirically: pedestrians suffer roughly the same proportion of head injuries.

  • Boardman launch 2014 Elite Series1 year 5 weeks agoFor the TT9.x, has Chris

    For the TT9.x, has Chris moved the front brake wire routing inside the frame or does it still stick out as per the second photo here:
    http://traumfahrrad.com/2012/04/13/boardman-air-tt-9-0-full-review/

    Wondering if there has been much change between the more affordable TT 2013 & 2014 bikes.

  • Campaigners criticise "self-fulfilling prophecy" as Department for Transport predicts decline in cycling1 year 5 weeks agomrmo wrote: The average

    mrmo wrote:
    The average journey is 8miles, well within the capability of current electric cars.

    I accept that the current technology can't match IC engines, and i doubt it ever can due to the energy density of hydrocarbons.

    I share the use of a Nissan Leaf, when I'm not on my bike, and very nice it is too. But an electric car, once manufacturing and electricity generation is taken into account, produces around 90 percent of the CO2 that a conventional car uses over its lifetime, and those figures don't take into account the CO2 produced in extra "employment hours", energy consumption and indirect costs such as childcare to amass the cash to pay the electric car premium.

    But, again, the answer lies with the humble bicycle, even for longer trips. An electric assisted velomobile can have a range of 400 miles, at a speed of 50mph, using a lithium battery the size of a shoe box, making it 80 times as efficient as a Nissan Leaf, and affordable for the masses through appropriate economies of scale. In fact, developments with "spray on" solar cells could easily result in the surface skin of a velomobile being able to produce more energy than it requires, even at relatively high speeds. All it would take would be a lifting of the speed restriction for electric assisted bicycles for these developments to be taken seriously as a viable alternative to long distance single occupancy car use.

    I suspect the loss of fuel duty revenue will be a tough one to crack. My opinion is that it will be replaced by road pricing. All new cars could be fitted with a "black box", and compulsory retro-fitting at the next MOT test would take care of the rest. From there, it would be easy to legislate for telemetrics based insurance, linking poor driver behaviour directly with higher premiums.

    But whatever the future holds, bicycles will play a key part in our transition to a low carbon economy.